New shadow cabinet

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Wilf Day
New shadow cabinet

Opening post.

Wilf Day

Let's start with the Official Opposition front bench. With 103 seats, the front bench might be 20 or 21 seats, let's assume 21.

Layton, Mulcair, Davies, Boivin, Harris, Comartin, Masse, Pat Martin, Angus, Crowder, Godin, Christopherson, Nash, Boulerice, Turmel, Cote, Day, Saganash, Moore, Caron, Perreault.

Eight women. Ten Quebecois.

Christine Moore ran in 2006 and 2008 in Abitibi even though she's only 27. Manon Perreault, 44, was a municipal councillor for seven years. But I left out Benskin.

Of the 103 NDP MPs, in Quebec we find 27 women and 32 men. In the ROC we find 13 women and 31 men.

Wilf Day

vaudree May 18 wrote:
Jack said something that I found quite upsetting ...

 

 

 

That I will have to wait until next week to find out who is where in the Shadow Cabinet.

Won't be long now.

Policywonk

Wilf Day wrote:

Let's start with the Official Opposition front bench. With 103 seats, the front bench might be 20 or 21 seats, let's assume 21.

Layton, Mulcair, Davies, Boivin, Harris, Comartin, Masse, Pat Martin, Angus, Crowder, Godin, Christopherson, Nash, Boulerice, Turmel, Cote, Day, Saganash, Moore, Caron, Perreault.

Eight women. Ten Quebecois.

Christine Moore ran in 2006 and 2008 in Abitibi even though she's only 27. Manon Perreault, 44, was a municipal councillor for seven years. But I left out Benskin.

Of the 103 NDP MPs, in Quebec we find 27 women and 32 men. In the ROC we find 13 women and 31 men.

I'm assuming you mean Jack Harris and not Dan Harris. I think the woman who bounced Duceppe, Hélène Laverdière, as well as Duncan and Cullen are possibilities. Probably not both Comartin and Masse and both Turmel and Boivin, although there will be more critic roles than just the front bench.

Uncle John

The Tory cabinet is almost 40, and Jack has enough members to assign one to each minister. He can put the senior ones against the senior ones, and the junior ones against the junior ones.

Having one pair of eyes on each cabinet position is probably not a bad idea, given the current circumstances. This also allows as many NDP members as possible to gain valuable experience with the portfolios should the NDP get a crack at government next time.

Wilf Day

Policywonk wrote:

Wilf Day wrote:

Let's start with the Official Opposition front bench. With 103 seats, the front bench might be 20 or 21 seats, let's assume 21.

Layton, Mulcair, Davies, Boivin, Harris, Comartin, Masse, Pat Martin, Angus, Crowder, Godin, Christopherson, Nash, Boulerice, Turmel, Cote, Day, Saganash, Moore, Caron, Perreault.

Eight women. Ten Quebecois.

Christine Moore ran in 2006 and 2008 in Abitibi even though she's only 27. Manon Perreault, 44, was a municipal councillor for seven years. But I left out Benskin.

Of the 103 NDP MPs, in Quebec we find 27 women and 32 men. In the ROC we find 13 women and 31 men.

I'm assuming you mean Jack Harris and not Dan Harris. I think the woman who bounced Duceppe, Hélène Laverdière, as well as Duncan and Cullen are possibilities. Probably not both Comartin and Masse and both Turmel and Boivin, although there will be more critic roles than just the front bench.

Masse is already on the front bench in the last House. Comartin belongs there too. So do both Boivin and Turmel.

We have lots of other talent, yes: Cullen, Dewar, Julian, Savoie, Duncan, Ashton, Leslie, and Chow could all fit nicely on the front bench. So could Peter Stoffer, if he ever gives up his last-row preference. But they'll be just as visible in the second row.

David Young

Given the usual seating arrangement in the House of Commons, the 'rump' of the Conservative caucus will take up the 12 seats to the immediate left of the Speaker (the 3 rows nearest the Speaker have 4 seats each), which puts the NDP caucus in the next 20 rows of 5, plus 3 more (perhaps a 21st front-row seat!)

I would expect an equal number of female and males in the 'front bench', with a few of the new Quebec caucus added to the returning MPs.

I know that Peter Stoffer likes to sit in the very back row, but maybe it's time he deserves a front-bench spot!

Here's how I'd assign the front-bench seats if I were the NDP Whip:

Stoffer, Ashton, Christopherson, Duncan, Julien, Laverdiere, Harris, Crowder, Angus, Chow, Layton, Mulcair, Libby Davies, Comartin, Mathyssen, Martin, Charlton, Masse, Turmel, Dewar, Nash.

An impressive front bench if I do say so myself!

 

Uncle John

27 women and 32 men in the Quebec caucus is awesome. Other parties should do so well!

Wilf Day

David Young wrote:
Here's how I'd assign the front-bench seats if I were the NDP Whip:

Stoffer, Ashton, Christopherson, Duncan, Julien, Laverdiere, Harris, Crowder, Angus, Chow, Layton, Mulcair, Libby Davies, Comartin, Mathyssen, Martin, Charlton, Masse, Turmel, Dewar, Nash.

An impressive front bench if I do say so myself!

Indeed. But only three from Quebec? Leaving out Boivin? Two from Montreal, but no one from the east 33% of Quebec? You're not serious. Quebec is 57% of the caucus. I thought I might be controversial in giving them only 10 of the 21 front bench seats.

Surely all six "ministrables" will be on the front bench: so add Boulerice, Saganash, and Benskin (who I had no room for). And then you must have a couple from the east of Quebec. Minimum eight.

 

Stockholm

Are we talking about front-benchers in terms of who are the critics of the most important portfolios (ie: finance, foreign affairs, industry, health etc...) or are we talking about who physically sits in the front row in the House? If its the latter (which I always thought was laregly based on seniority) then who cares? Watching TV you really only see the leader and who is immediately beside and behind him - I could not tell you who was in the front bench of the Liberal and BQ caucuses.

If I was a new NDP MP, I would say - "te hell with being at the far end of the front bench. I want to be in the second row directly behind Layton so that my constituents see me everytime Layton speaks!  

Wilf Day

Stockholm wrote:
If I was a new NDP MP, I would say - "to hell with being at the far end of the front bench. I want to be in the second row directly behind Layton so that my constituents see me everytime Layton speaks!

Indeed. Since we have more than 21 stars and critics, that's where some will be.

Stockholm wrote:

Are we talking about front-benchers in terms of who are the critics of the most important portfolios (ie: finance, foreign affairs, industry, health etc...) or are we talking about who physically sits in the front row in the House? If its the latter (which I always thought was laregly based on seniority) . . .

Not entirely. In the last House, Brian Masse elected in 2002 and Jack Harris elected in 2008 (unless you count that 1987 by-election) were in the front row ahead of Godin elected in 1997 and Comartin elected in 2000. (I've never known why Masse was put in the front bench, although I'm sure he's very able.)

And it's certainly a mark of some respect, hence the term "frontbencher" and "backbencher." The leaders of the Government and the Opposition sit on the frontbenches, with their supporters, or backbenchers, behind them. With 33 caucus members from the ROC elected ealier than 2011, plus Boivin and Mulcair, pure seniority would make no new Quebec MPs frontbenchers, maybe five in the second row behind Jack, and the other 52 pure backbenchers. I don't think so. 

West Coast Lefty

It's my underrstanding that the physical "front bench" for each party in the House is very much dictated by seniority (year first elected to the House of Commons) - so Harris's 1987 by-election win would trump Godin's 1997 win.  Boivin was elected as a Liberal MP in 2004 so she's more senior than most of the NDP MPs in the caucus, including Mulcair, Dewar, Chow, etc.  Nash was first elected in 2006 so she not only trumps the 2011 rookies but also the class of 2008. 

I agree with Stockholm that the much more important issue is the critic portfolios, and the MPs directly behind the stars like Layton and Mulcair will get a lot more profile than most of the front-benchers. 

David Young

I based my list of front bench MPs mostly on seniority, but adding some of the new Quebec members.

And Boivin was an MP for 2 years, 2004-2006, while Dewar and Chow were elected in 2006, so they have 5 years of experience; that gives them seniority over Boivin IMHO.

Shall we start a pool to see who can guess who gets the front-bench spots?

 

Wilf Day

David Young wrote:
Shall we start a pool to see who can guess who gets the front-bench spots?

As I said, the six ministrables, and two from the east (Cote and Day), for sure.

But is that it for Quebec? No.

Ten women would be good, and ten Quebecois, half men, half women.

Two of Laverdière, Perreault or Moore?

You left out Savoie, elected in 2006; but she was in the fourth row last time as Deputy Speaker. So let's leave her out of the front row.

I wonder if Comartin is at Layton's left shoulder so he can have an instant consultation?

But ignoring that idea, let's say the 11 from the ROC are Harris, Crowder, Angus, Layton, Libby Davies, Comartin, Mathyssen, Martin, Charlton, Masse, Nash.

As for the two additional women from Quebec, I'll guess Laverdière and Perreault, but it's a pure guess.

Policywonk

Wilf Day wrote:

David Young wrote:
Shall we start a pool to see who can guess who gets the front-bench spots?

As I said, the six ministrables, and two from the east (Cote and Day), for sure.

But is that it for Quebec? No.

Ten women would be good, and ten Quebecois, half men, half women.

Two of Laverdière, Perreault or Moore?

You left out Savoie, elected in 2006; but she was in the fourth row last time as Deputy Speaker. So let's leave her out of the front row.

I wonder if Comartin is at Layton's left shoulder so he can have an instant consultation?

But ignoring that idea, let's say the 11 from the ROC are Harris, Crowder, Angus, Layton, Libby Davies, Comartin, Mathyssen, Martin, Charlton, Masse, Nash.

As for the two additional women from Quebec, I'll guess Laverdière and Perreault, but it's a pure guess.

It's unlikely, but Savoie may be in a different seat altogether.

ottawaobserver

I've been thinking about this. If Denise Savoie can sew up all the opposition support on the first ballot, and none of the Conservatives can get unanimous support from their own caucus, she has a fighting chance.

David Young

Does anyone here seriously believe that control freak Harper is going to allow the position of Speaker to go to anyone but a Conservative?

The fix will be in before the first votes are cast.

Perhaps Denise will get one of the assistant positions.

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Regardless of the make up of the 'shadow cabinet', the Opposition MP's should be on the attack relentlessly - attack, attack, attack. And when there's nothing to attack from the government agenda, attack FPTP, and show how unfair it is - again, relentlessly (for example, with about 38% of the vote, the Conservatives got about 54% of the seats).

Wilf Day

Boom Boom wrote:
Regardless of the make up of the 'shadow cabinet', the Opposition MP's should be on the attack relentlessly - attack, attack, attack.

However, I note that Jack astutely held his fire on the cabinet appointments. He saw there was nothing much to attack there, so he didn't. Then, a few minutes later, the three Senate appointments were announced. Harper expected the media would be preoccupied with the cabinet. Jack came out guns blazing. Harper's trick failed.

Boom Boom wrote:
And when there's nothing to attack from the government agenda, attack FPTP, and show how unfair it is - again, relentlessly (for example, with about 38% of the vote, the Conservatives got about 54% of the seats).

Right, but it's not about parties' rights, it's about voters' rights. Alberta Liberal voters who elected no one. Saskatchewan NDP voters who elected no one. Montreal Conservative voters who elected no one (and are unrepresented in cabinet.)  Southwestern Ontario Liberal voters who elected no one. Eastern Ontario NDP voters who elected only one MP, rather than the four their numbers deserved. Green Party voters in 307 ridings who elected no one. In fact, 60.4% of voters who elected only 46% of the MPs. 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Yes, 'voter's rights' is just another way of expressing what I meant. This needs to be expressed in Parliament often.

Wilf Day

David Young wrote:
Does anyone here seriously believe that control freak Harper is going to allow the position of Speaker to go to anyone but a Conservative?

Control freak or not, this is census year. Next, redistribution. "The Speaker of the House of Commons appoints two members" in each province to be commissioners; the third is a judge. Wrong year for an opposition member to be Speaker.

Wilf Day

Layton is expected to name his shadow cabinet later this week, and has suggested it will reflect the fact that 40 per cent of his caucus is female.

Okay, scratch Laverdière and Perreault from my pool picks. Instead, Guy Caron and Hoang Mai.

Wilf Day wrote:

David Young wrote:
Shall we start a pool to see who can guess who gets the front-bench spots?

As I said, the six ministrables, and two from the east (Cote and Day), for sure.

But is that it for Quebec? No.

Ten women would be good, and ten Quebecois, half men, half women.

Two of Laverdière, Perreault or Moore?

You left out Savoie, elected in 2006; but she was in the fourth row last time as Deputy Speaker. So let's leave her out of the front row.

I wonder if Comartin is at Layton's left shoulder so he can have an instant consultation?

But ignoring that idea, let's say the 11 from the ROC are Harris, Crowder, Angus, Layton, Libby Davies, Comartin, Mathyssen, Martin, Charlton, Masse, Nash.

As for the two additional women from Quebec, I'll guess Laverdière and Perreault, but it's a pure guess.

David Young

Wilf, you will note that I said the pool was about the front bench, not necessarity the shadow cabinet in total.

We may have to wait until June 2 to see who gets the front-row seats.

And I'm sticking with my first picks, unless any of them don't get critic assignments, then I may adjust.

 

David Young

But then again, if there is a postal strike, Parliament could be recalled sooner than that, and we might see who's there quicker.

 

ottawaobserver

I thought I heard that they settled, today, David (re postal strike, though you would know better).

Policywonk

ottawaobserver wrote:

I thought I heard that they settled, today, David (re postal strike, though you would know better).

No, CUPW just decided not to submit a 72-hour strike notice.

David Young

I would hope one of them would be in the shadow cabinet responsible for African affairs, and will ask a lot of questions about Libya.

 

Wilf Day

I wonder if any of the four MPs of North African origin will have prominent positions:

Quote:
Djaouida Sellah, of Algerian origins, was elected in the riding of Saint-Bruno-Saint-Hubert in the southern suburbs of Montreal. She managed to get elected with 44.6% of the votes cast. Coming to Canada in 1998, she served as a physician and is President of the Quebec Association of Doctors Graduated outside Canada and the United States. She is the mother of three children.

Tarik Brahimi was born in Lyon (France). His father is from Toudja (Bejaia). He won 47.4 of the votes cast in the constituency of Saint-Jean. Attached both to Quebec, where he arrived in 2002, and to his country of birth, he said he had planned to go to Algeria to relax if he was defeated. He was elected despite his "Arabic name, his French accent and his baldness" the Statistics Canada employee likes to emphasize. 

Sadia Groguhé was born in Marseille (France) to Algerian parents. She was elected in the riding of St. Lambert in the southern suburbs of Montreal with a comfortable score of 42.2%. This mother of four children arrived in Canada in 2005. She has a master's degree in psychology and works as a guidance counselor. Her relationship with France, she summed up in one sentence: "I'm not integrated into France but I was born there."

The Canadian Parliament will welcome another candidate from the Maghreb. This is Sana Hassainia who comes from Tunisia. She was elected, too, under the NDP banner.

 

Stockholm

Layton is apparently unveiling the shadow cabinet at 11am.

JeffWells

Some advance word in the Globe on some changes to expect: Libby Davies takes over health, Jasbir Sandhu takes public safety, Francoise Boivin takes status of women.

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ottawa-notebook/layton-flex...

Stockholm

I wonder if they are leaving a slot for Denise Savoie dependent on whether she's elected speaker?

Stockholm

The tweets are saying that Peggy nash is the new shadow Finance Minister. I think its a very good move - esp. to give such a high profile economic position to a woman - in opposition to government that is almost all men.

JeffWells

Watching Layton now on CBC News and saw Nash announcement. That's very good.

Aristotleded24

Stockholm wrote:
The tweets are saying that Peggy nash is the new shadow Finance Minister. I think its a very good move - esp. to give such a high profile economic position to a woman - in opposition to government that is almost all men.

I agree. Good choice.

Caissa

NDP Leader Jack Layton announced his team of critics Thursday morning in Ottawa, mostly keeping his veteran MPs in their previous roles but giving 20 newcomers a chance to shine.

Layton's deputy leader, Tom Mulcair, was named the NDP's House leader, bumping Libby Davies out of the post. She moves to the health critic role, which in turn, bounced Halifax MP Megan Leslie over to environment. Joe Comartin keeps the justice portfolio, Jack Harris is in defence, Paul Dewar stays foreign affairs critic and Olivia Chow is charged with the transport and infrastructure file.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2011/05/26/pol-layton-shadow-cabinet.html

http://www.scribd.com/doc/56384218/NDP-Shadow-Cabinet-List

 

Life, the unive...

Why would Alex Atamanenko be bumped from the shadow cabinet?  He was very good in his role.  Don't like that choice.

JeffWells

huffingtonpost.ca debuts today with above-the-fold headline "Orange Shadow":

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca

 

Story link:

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2011/05/26/layton-shadow-cabinet_n_867435.html

 

Krago

My workplace is blocking the scribd.com link.  Could someone post the list of Opposition critics?

Aristotleded24

Life, the universe, everything wrote:
Why would Alex Atamanenko be bumped from the shadow cabinet?  He was very good in his role.  Don't like that choice.

Maybe Alex didn't want that role.

In any case, Malcolm Allen should do a good job. I'm glad Charlie Angus is on the ethics file, I think he's personable enough that people will take seriously and not shrug off as "just another politician," to say nothing of Pat Martin coming across as an angry lunatic on a few occaisions and doing the NDP more harm than good. Not sure if having a Winnipeg MP as critic for the Wheat Board is good, but it's clearly a case of the NDP making do with what it has. I'm disappointed that Peter Julian is no longer the trade critic, he was very good on the NAFTA-like trade deals that Canada was signing onto, I hope Chisolm will carry on. Unfortunately with Dewar back in Foreign Affairs, the NDP still has no ability to articulate anything resembling a credible Foreign Policy.

Wilf Day

Krago wrote:
Could someone post the list of Opposition critics?

Here you are, opposite the names of those they shadow:

Harper, Stephen (Right Hon.) Prime Minister Layton, Jack

(Hon.)Ritz, Gerry (Hon.) Agriculture and Agri-Food Allen, Malcolm

Clement, Tony (Hon.)/Moore, James (Hon.) Ethics, Access to Information and Privacy & Copyright and Digital Issues Angus, Charlie

Valcourt, Bernard (Hon.) La Francophonie Aubin, Robert

Ablonczy, Diane (Hon.) Americas and Consular Affairs (Minister of State) Ayala, Paulina

Moore, James (Hon.) Canadian Heritage Benskin, Tyrone

Ambrose, Rona (Hon.) Status of Women Boivin, Francoise

Clement, Tony (Hon.) Treasury Board Boulerice, Alexandre

Finley, Diane (Hon.) Skills (Human Resources and Skills Development) Boutin-Sweet, Marjolaine

Fast, Ed (Hon.) International Trade Chisholm, Robert

Lebel, Denis (Hon.) Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Chow, Olivia

Uppal, Tim (Hon.) Democratic Reform (Minster of State) Christopherson, Dave

Nicholson, Rob (Hon.) Justice Comartin, Joe

Maxime, Bernier (Hon.) Small Business and Tourism (Minister of State) Côté, Raymond

Finley, Diane (Hon.) Human Resources and Skills Development Crowder, Jean

Kenney, Jason (Hon.) Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Davies, Don

Aglukkaq, Leona (Hon.) Health Davies, Libby

Baird, John (Hon.) Foreign Affairs Dewar, Paul

Ashfeild, Keith (Hon.) Fisheries and Oceans Donnelly, Fin

Duncan, John (Hon.) Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Duncan, Linda

Raitt, Lisa (Hon.) Labour and Official Languages Godin, Yvon

MacKay, Peter (Hon.) National Defence Harris, Jack

Clement, Tony (Hon.) Industry and Deputy National Caucus Chair Julian, Peter

Oda, Bev (Hon.) International Cooperation Laverdière, Hélène

Goodyear, Gary (Hon.) Science and Technology (Minister of State) Leblanc, Hélène

Kent, Peter (Hon.) Environment Leslie, Megan

Shea, Gail (Hon.) National Revenue Mai, Hoang

Menzies, Ted (Hon.) Pensions (Minister of State) Marston, Wayne

Ritz, Gerry (Hon.) Canadian Wheat Board Martin, Pat

Wong, Alice (Hon.) Seniors (Minister of State) Mathyssen, Irene

Fantino, Julian (Hon.) Military Procurement (Associate Minister of National Defence) Moore, Christine

Finley, Diane (Hon.) Housing (Human Resources and Skills Development) Morin, Marie-Claude

Van Loan, Peter (Hon.) Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons Mulcair, Tom

Gosal, Bal (Hon.) Sport (Minister of State) Nantel, Pierre

Flaherty, Jim (Hon.) Finance Nash, Peggy

Finley, Diane (Hon.) Employment Insurance (Human Resources and Skills Development) Patry, Claude

Finley, Diane (Hon.) Disabilities (Human Resources and Skills Development) Perreault, Manon

Oliver, Joe (Hon.) Minister of Natural Resources Saganash, Romeo

Toews, Vic (Hon.) Minister of Public Safety Sandhu, Jasbir

Finley, Diane (Hon.) Post-secondary Education (Human Resources and Skills Development) Sitsabaiesan, Rathika

Blaney, Steven (Hon.) Veterans Affairs Stoffer, Peter

Clement, Tony (Hon.) Consumer Protection (Industry) Thibeault, Glenn

Ambrose, Rona (Hon.) Public Works and Government Services and National Caucus Chair Turmel, Nycole

SwineFlewBy SwineFlewBy's picture

And Chris Charlton is Chief Opposition Whip

 

Policywonk

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

Why would Alex Atamanenko be bumped from the shadow cabinet?  He was very good in his role.  Don't like that choice.

Nathan Cullen and Nikki Ashton are also missing. I suppose someone had to miss out with so many to choose from.

Krago

The NDP has six critics who will be going after Diane Finley:

  • Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet
  • Jean Crowder
  • Marie-Claude Morin
  • Claude Patry
  • Manon Perreault
  • Rathika Sitsabaiesan

Stockholm

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Not sure if having a Winnipeg MP as critic for the Wheat Board is good, but it's clearly a case of the NDP making do with what it has.

There isn't much alternative. There are a couple of farmers from rural ridings in the NDP caucus, but they are from Quebec where the wheat board has no relevance. Would it be any better to have Linda Duncan or Nikki Ashton as critic for the wheat board?? Ideally Nettie Wiebe or Noah Evanchuk would have been elected and would have been an obvious choice for that role - but them's the breaks!

Aristotleded24

Stockholm wrote:
Aristotleded24 wrote:
Not sure if having a Winnipeg MP as critic for the Wheat Board is good, but it's clearly a case of the NDP making do with what it has.
There isn't much alternative. There are a couple of farmers from rural ridings in the NDP caucus, but they are from Quebec where the wheat board has no relevance. Would it be any better to have Linda Duncan or Nikki Ashton as critic for the wheat board?? Ideally Nettie Wiebe or Noah Evanchuk would have been elected and would have been an obvious choice for that role - but them's the breaks!

Hence my inclusion of the phrase, "it's clearly a case of the NDP making do with what it has."

Krago

Here are the 11 re-elected NDP incumbents who did not receive Critic responsibilites: 

  • Alex Atamanenko
  • Brian Masse
  • Bruce Hyer
  • Carol Hughes
  • Chris Charlton
  • Claude Gravelle
  • Denise Savoie
  • Dennis Bevington
  • John Rafferty
  • Nathan Cullen
  • Niki Ashton

Some may have been given other caucus positions.

Wilf Day

Policywonk wrote:
Nathan Cullen and Niki Ashton are also missing.

That doesn't seem possible. Have they quietly let it be known they are planning to run in the coming provincial elections?

Stockholm

Krago wrote:

Here are the 11 re-elected NDP incumbents who did not receive Critic responsibilites: 

  • Alex Atamanenko
  • Brian Masse
  • Bruce Hyer
  • Carol Hughes
  • Chris Charlton
  • Claude Gravelle
  • Denise Savoie
  • Dennis Bevington
  • John Rafferty
  • Nathan Cullen
  • Niki Ashton

Some may have been given other caucus positions.

Gee, a lot of MPs from northern/remote ridings are not in the shadow cabinet.

Chris Charlton is opposition whip which comes with extra pay! Someone from the NDP will chair the public accounts committee and possibly one or two other house committees and there will be a deputy speaker and a deputy whip and there will also almost certainly be chairs of regional caucuses etc...the shadow cabinet seems to be strictly a matching of critics to cabinet ministers. There will be other roles assigned that do not involve being an opposite number to a particular person on the government side.

Wilf Day

I see all the Quebecois I thought were possible front-benchers are in the shadow cabinet except, oddly, Anne-Marie Day (Charlesbourg-Haute-Saint-Charles), who was (still is?) co-chair of the federal NDP Policy Committee. What happened to her? And I thought Guy Caron was a shoe-in.

Claude Patry on EI sounds excellent. Glad to see they found a role for Trois-Rivieres' Robert Aubin. and for Chilean exile Paulina Ayala.

And Rathika Sitsabaiesan on Post-Secondary Education is wonderful.

ghoris

Chris Charlton is the Whip, which I believe is a position elected by the caucus as a whole (unlike the other parties).

Nathan Cullen being left out is a huge surprise.  He is one of only a dozen MPs elected before 2006 (Layton, Godin, Stoffer, Martin, L. Davies, Crowder, Julian, Angus, Masse, Comartin and Christopherson being the others).  Of the pre-2006 MPs, I believe he is the only one not named to the shadow cabinet.

Stockholm

ghoris wrote:

Nathan Cullen being left out is a huge surprise.

He is a new father of twins and has the longest commute to his riding of any MP - he may have asked for less responsibility?

He is apparently the new chair of the House Ethics Committee.

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