New shadow cabinet

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duncan cameron

Wilf, Guy Charon is Quebec caucus chair, a key slot, obviously.

Stockholm

Its Caron not Charon

David Young

Stoffer, Ashton, Christopherson, Duncan, Julien, Laverdiere, Harris, Crowder, Angus, Chow, Layton, Mulcair, Libby Davies, Comartin, Mathyssen, Martin, Charlton, Masse, Turmel, Dewar, Nash.

An impressive front bench if I do say so myself!

Okay, Charlton is now the Whip, so I'll bet Yvon Godin gets a front-bench spot, and with Niki Ashton not assigned a critic's task, probably Hoang Mai will make it to there as well.

 

Anonymouse

I'm surprised by the absence of Caron and Cash. Roméo Saganash could turn out to be a formidable Natural Resources critic. I like that choice. It's too bad he is not up against another Québecker in that portfolio.

One of the NDP's greatest opportunities in the next Parliament and next campaign is in making up electoral ground among Canadian visible minorities. The shadow cabinet is not strong enough in that regard but understandable given the huge number of rookie MPs the NDP has to contend with. I hope over time we will see some shuffling to give additional deserving vis min MPs a prominent role. For one, I am surprised but hopeful that Jinny Sims makes it onto the front bench. She has tremendous potential, more than Jasbir Sandhu perhaps, albeit maybe Jasbir is the best suited NDPer for the Public Safety file (Randall Garrison would also make a fine choice, although it is a much much bigger issue in Jasbir's riding).

The Conservatives have yet to announce their parliamentary secretaries and I imagine the NDP will copy the Liberal tactic of naming "outreach" MPs for different political constituencies. There will also have to be some NDP MPs that distinguish themselves for their jack-of-all-trades House service, a very important role.

Eventually, I hope to see the NDP trim its shadow cabinet too. Harper's record 39 member cabinet is bloated beyond belief and I don't want the NDP, as it aims for government-in-waiting, to project the same image. Ideally, I would like to see a Canadian cabinet in the neighbourhood of 13 ministers. Dare to dream, eh?

ghoris

I've often thought it would make sense for Canada to adopt something like the UK system, where you have a small number of full ministers (Secretaries of State) responsible for large portfolios, with several ranks of junior ministers (Ministers of State, Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State and Parliamentary Private Secretaries) for specific areas of responsibility within each portfolio, who are not members of the Cabinet.  For example, if we applied a UK-style system to DFAIT, there would be one Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (who sits in cabinet), and then a Minister of State for International Trade, a Minister of State for International Co-operation and a Minister of State for Consular Affairs (all outside the cabinet).  Currently these four positions are all full cabinet ministers.

melovesproles

Keeping Dewar in Foreign Affairs is a big mistake. 

ValerieBolduc

Wilf Day wrote:

Policywonk wrote:
Nathan Cullen and Niki Ashton are also missing.

That doesn't seem possible. Have they quietly let it be known they are planning to run in the coming provincial elections?

I'm also surprised about this.

knownothing knownothing's picture

Pat Martin is by far my favorite NDP MP. I saw him on a panel on the Wheat Board during the campaign and he was awesome against Gerry Ritz. I think he is going to be amazing as the Wheat Board becomes dismantled. This is an important issue as many farmers still support the Wheat Board. All press is good press in opposition!

ghoris

melovesproles wrote:

Keeping Dewar in Foreign Affairs is a big mistake. 

Why do you feel that to be the case? Just curious.

Lord Palmerston

I would prefer someone who doesn't seem to think the party should see eye to eye with Obama.  

Peggy Nash as Finance critic sounds good.  It's nice to have a person from the trade union movement in that position.  Generally when in power social democratic parties have tried to appoint their most conservative and "business friendly" people to the finance minister.  (Then again, Floyd Laughren was known as a lefty and he quickly moved to the right).

Wilf Day

ghoris wrote:
I've often thought it would make sense for Canada to adopt something like the UK system, where you have a small number of full ministers (Secretaries of State) responsible for large portfolios, with several ranks of junior ministers (Ministers of State, Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State and Parliamentary Private Secretaries) for specific areas of responsibility within each portfolio, who are not members of the Cabinet.  For example, if we applied a UK-style system to DFAIT, there would be one Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (who sits in cabinet), and then a Minister of State for International Trade, a Minister of State for International Co-operation and a Minister of State for Consular Affairs (all outside the cabinet).  Currently these four positions are all full cabinet ministers.

India has this down to a fine art. They have a rank of higher junior ministers ("Minister of State") who are above the lesser junior ministers because they get to add the words "Independent Charge." It has 35 Ministers, 6 Ministers of State (Independent Charge), and 38 Ministers of State. Or it did, the last time anyone updated Wikipedia. Some ministries seem to have been split up just to multiply the number of available positions. (Canada, of course, never does that, do we?) It all reminds me of the classic crack in India: "You British invented bureaucracy, but we Indians perfected it."

JeffWells

ghoris wrote:

melovesproles wrote:

Keeping Dewar in Foreign Affairs is a big mistake. 

Why do you feel that to be the case? Just curious.

 

"There is a surprising confluence between the NDP and Conservatives on foreign policy, unless you believe, as Paul Dewar does, that tone and emphasis matter more than substance."

[url=http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ndp-foreign-defence-policy-...'s Globe[/url]

JeffWells

Lord Palmerston wrote:

Peggy Nash as Finance critic sounds good.  It's nice to have a person from the trade union movement in that position.  Generally when in power social democratic parties have tried to appoint their most conservative and "business friendly" people to the finance minister.

Yes. Nelson Riis comes quickly to mind.

Sadly, Dewar is to Foreign Affairs what Riis was to Finance.

Also worth noting re Nash, Canada has never had a female Finance Minister.

 

adma

Though did Floyd Laughren fit that mould?

West Coast Lefty

Krago wrote:

Here are the 11 re-elected NDP incumbents who did not receive Critic responsibilites: 

  • Alex Atamanenko
  • Brian Masse
  • Bruce Hyer
  • Carol Hughes
  • Chris Charlton
  • Claude Gravelle
  • Denise Savoie
  • Dennis Bevington
  • John Rafferty
  • Nathan Cullen
  • Niki Ashton

Some may have been given other caucus positions.

A few thoughts on this list:

- Denise is running for Speaker, so they likely are holding off on naming her to any other role until the June 2 vote on Speaker.  Charlton will do great as Whip and she is definitely a rising star in the caucus.

- I was surprised and disappointed at Atamenko's exclusion as he did great work as AG critic, esp on the food security issue.  Regionally, it's odd that all of the BC Critics are from the Lower Mainland, except Crowder from the Island.  Not having a critic from the North/Interior is a big omission.  I guess Cullen may get some committee appointment but Atamenko should have been retained as Critic (Don Davies could have been moved to a key committee role instead of critic).

- It may be a coincidence but I notice that the 5 re-elected NDP MPs who voted with Harper on the gun registry on 3rd reading (Ashton, Cullen, Hyer, Rafferty, Bevington - Malloway was the 6th and he was defeated) are all excluded from the shadow Cabinet.  Not to re-open the registry debate yet again, but I do think/hope that this means that Layton thinks of the NDP caucus as an alternative government and realizes that a) we need clear and defined positions on controversial issues (50% plus 1 for Quebec secession vote, gun registry) and that the old "let's agree to disagree" line for the registry won't cut it when we're in Oppositon and b) a shadow Cabinet needs people who are aligned with the leadership with the majority of the membership and caucus on policy direction.  Finally and most importantly, with 59 NDP MPs from Quebec, I would think it is imperative that the NDP caucus will vote 100% against the Harper bill to kill the registry.  This may be a litmus test for the future roles of the "gang of 5" in the caucus going forward.

- I hope Jinny Sims gets a prominent role in another capacity as she is a very prominent labour leader and well-known in the Indo-Canadian community as well. 

- Megan Leslie is an excellent choice for Environment and Libby will do us proud in Health. Peter Julian will be a formidable critic to Paradis in Industry. 

It's a fine list overall, IMHO.

 

Stockholm

West Coast Lefty wrote:

Regionally, it's odd that all of the BC Critics are from the Lower Mainland, except Crowder from the Island.  Not having a critic from the North/Interior is a big omission.  I guess Cullen may get some committee appointment but Atamenko should have been retained as Critic (Don Davies could have been moved to a key committee role instead of critic).

If you exclude Crowder and all the NDP MPs from the lower mainland - you are only left with two MPs in all of BC - Atamanenko and Cullen (who is apparently going to become chair of the house ethics committee - which is probably a more prestigious and important a position than most critic portfolios and also comes with some extra $$).

knownothing knownothing's picture
KenS

Here's some particulars I find notable:

Megan Leslie did a good job of learning the Health portfolio- but Environment she is more than up to speed on already.

There was no way that Tom Mulcair had time for Finance any more. He has a lot to do helping manage this Caucus and getting around Quebec. House Leader is a better fit with those tasks.

Fantastic that Peggy Nash gets a chance to shine.

Robert Chisholm has no background in his critic area. Presumably he's there as a place he can be featured, without having a ton of pressure.

Putting Peter Stoffer on the front benches is interesting. I doubt that it is just because as Opposition critic now he gets more time to pursue Veterans Affairs. Peter is a good debater with a sharp funny wit- but he's also Mr. Nice Guy on the Hill. My hunch is that he's the secret weapon in Jack's dictum of no heckling. Barbs without heckling is what you will get from Peter. The House could use some understated humour. Now that there are more options, I see Mulcair calling on Stoffer for questions outside his critic role. And a good counterpoint to Mulcair's own style for that matter. Who knows, maybe even some good cop / bad cop routines. A hunch only, but one to watch.

Anonymouse

One thing about the NDP shadow cabinet that really sucks is the lack of strong non-union voices on the economy. Given that this is the reason the NDP lost to the Conservatives last time around (e.g. Harper owned the economy issue), I expect this will be a millstone around the NDP's electoral neck for the next 4+ years.

janfromthebruce

I respectfully disagree with you Anon. Across the aisle is the opponent of big business and corporations and it's natural opposite is Labour. Nash is quite knowledgable about both union and non-union labour including non-waged labour which is often the "female domaine".

knownothing knownothing's picture

Why did Peggy Nash dodge the Quebec question on Power and Politics? Why didn't she just take the same stand as Jack Layton?

Lord Palmerston

janfromthebruce wrote:

I respectfully disagree with you Anon. Across the aisle is the opponent of big business and corporations and it's natural opposite is Labour. Nash is quite knowledgable about both union and non-union labour including non-waged labour which is often the "female domaine".

I very much agree, Jan.  Peggy Nash as finance critic is a fantastic choice.  This really opens the door to an ideological debate over the economy, as the Liberals and Conservatives just aren't very different on that front.  While Flaherty clearly speaks for Bay St. and the corporate elite, Peggy can articulate an alternative, pro-working class perspective.

Krago

Here is my favourite new NDP MP:

 

Alain Giguère
1984 -- Verdun-Saint-Paul -- maintenance worker -- 3,912 -- 9.8%
1993 -- Roberval -- student -- 500 -- 1.5%
1997 -- Roberval -- lawyer -- 412 -- 1.3%
2000 -- Roberval -- tax expert -- 437 -- 1.4%
2004 -- Laval -- lawyer -- 1,998 -- 4.1%
2006 -- Laval-Les Îles -- lawyer -- 3,817 -- 7.2%
2008 -- Laval -- lawyer -- 6,289 -- 12.5%
2011 -- Marc-Aurèle-Fortin -- lawyer -- 29,107 -- 49.7%

Has anyone else got first elected to the House of Commons on their eighth attempt?

autoworker autoworker's picture

knownothing wrote:

Why did Peggy Nash dodge the Quebec question on Power and Politics? Why didn't she just take the same stand as Jack Layton?

Because discretion is the better part of valour.

Anonymouse

The issue is not Peggy Nash. I like Peggy Nash. The issue is the whole shadow cabinet or perhaps, the whole caucus. Who are the really strong non-union voices on the economy? As noted, it's good to have union voices, it's just that unions are pretty marginal in the economy as a whole (and even more marginal if we just look at the private sector), who speaks for the other 5/6ths? The NDP could've taken it's shadow cabinet as an opportunity to bridge this gap, they didn't. Perhaps they can partially rectify this when they announce "outreach" responsibilities. Also, it'd be smart if Raymond Côté were up to the task to play a lot more than a junior critic role to a junior minister. Not only would it build on the NDP's successful inroads to small business during the last campaign (which was the issue Nelson Riis fought so hard for the NDP to take up over the opposition of almost everyone in the NDP caucus), but it might cause "Mad Max" Bernier to slip up, as he's wont to do.

janfromthebruce

 

steady and slow wins the race - I love that! NDP is never going to stop!

Krago wrote:

Here is my favourite new NDP MP:

 

Alain Giguère
1984 -- Verdun-Saint-Paul -- maintenance worker -- 3,912 -- 9.8%
1993 -- Roberval -- student -- 500 -- 1.5%
1997 -- Roberval -- lawyer -- 412 -- 1.3%
2000 -- Roberval -- tax expert -- 437 -- 1.4%
2004 -- Laval -- lawyer -- 1,998 -- 4.1%
2006 -- Laval-Les Îles -- lawyer -- 3,817 -- 7.2%
2008 -- Laval -- lawyer -- 6,289 -- 12.5%
2011 -- Marc-Aurèle-Fortin -- lawyer -- 29,107 -- 49.7%

Has anyone else got first elected to the House of Commons on their eighth attempt?

______________________________________________________________________________________ Our kids live together and play together in their communities, let's have them learn together too!

janfromthebruce

Marginal - unions - really - in whose eyes? The few with the most, or the many with the least? Rhetorical response but I so had to reply to that neoliberal meme. As for small business, I have no problems and actually promote small business as part of the NDP. And having someone who is a junior minister or critic in this area under Nash would be good!

 

Anonymouse wrote:

The issue is not Peggy Nash. I like Peggy Nash. The issue is the whole shadow cabinet or perhaps, the whole caucus. Who are the really strong non-union voices on the economy? As noted, it's good to have union voices, it's just that unions are pretty marginal in the economy as a whole (and even more marginal if we just look at the private sector), who speaks for the other 5/6ths? The NDP could've taken it's shadow cabinet as an opportunity to bridge this gap, they didn't. Perhaps they can partially rectify this when they announce "outreach" responsibilities. Also, it'd be smart if Raymond Côté were up to the task to play a lot more than a junior critic role to a junior minister. Not only would it build on the NDP's successful inroads to small business during the last campaign (which was the issue Nelson Riis fought so hard for the NDP to take up over the opposition of almost everyone in the NDP caucus), but it might cause "Mad Max" Bernier to slip up, as he's wont to do.

______________________________________________________________________________________ Our kids live together and play together in their communities, let's have them learn together too!

ottawaobserver

Layton made it clear in the news conference where he announced the shadow cabinet, that it was only the first of a series of announcements of roles for caucus members.

Caron is supposedly the new NDP Quebec Caucus chair, I hear, and I suspect Ashton will be the chair of the Standing Committee on the Status of Women, one of several Commons Committees whose chairs are reserved for opposition members.

There are also probably a bunch of activist-outreach-type positions on issues like LGBT (the issue that was raised in the scrum at Layton's newser which led to him saying it was the first in a series of announcements), and several others I'm sure.

Notice that Jack has had a lengthy scrum covered live on both news networks every day since Tuesday of this week, so they've obviously got a strategy for building up some news coverage in the lead up to the Commons' return on June 2.

I also notice that they cut off Bob Rae to go to Jack's scrum the other day. ;-)

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Could someone explain what the hell Layton was thinking when he said Harper would represent Quebec in his cabinet?

Gee,Jack...Way to work to give Harper a friendly Quebec face.

knownothing knownothing's picture

autoworker wrote:

knownothing wrote:

Why did Peggy Nash dodge the Quebec question on Power and Politics? Why didn't she just take the same stand as Jack Layton?

Because discretion is the better part of valour.

Too much discretion is stagnation and avoidance

Stockholm

Anonymouse wrote:

The issue is not Peggy Nash. I like Peggy Nash. The issue is the whole shadow cabinet or perhaps, the whole caucus. Who are the really strong non-union voices on the economy? As noted, it's good to have union voices, it's just that unions are pretty marginal in the economy as a whole (and even more marginal if we just look at the private sector), who speaks for the other 5/6ths?

I find this comment a bit ridiculous. Since when is a person supposed to be disqualified from talking about the economy just because they once worked for a union? The fact is that unions are just about the only institutions (other than chartered banks and rightwing think-tanks) with the resources to train and employ economists. Yes, Peggy Nash used to work for the CAW - so what? That doesn't mean that is the only perspective she brings to the table. Flaherty used to work on Bay St. who speaks for the 99.99% of Canadians who are not investment bankers? I suppose you could also argue that since Nash is from Toronto - she will ONLY offer a Toronto perspective on the economy and that no other region's interests will be considered.

FWIW, usually after the finance critic, the other shadow portfolio that is the most "economic" is Industry and the NDP Industry critic is Peter Julian - I don't believe he's from a union. Are you happy now?

knownothing knownothing's picture
JeffWells

alan smithee wrote:
Could someone explain what the hell Layton was thinking when he said Harper would represent Quebec in his cabinet? Gee,Jack...Way to work to give Harper a friendly Quebec face.

I think it's good tactics. Raise expectations upon Harper, and then go at him when he doesn't rise to the challenge. Give him a chance to fail in his own right rather than attacking based on the presumption of his failure.

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

JeffWells wrote:

alan smithee wrote:
Could someone explain what the hell Layton was thinking when he said Harper would represent Quebec in his cabinet? Gee,Jack...Way to work to give Harper a friendly Quebec face.

I think it's good tactics. Raise expectations upon Harper, and then go at him when he doesn't rise to the challenge. Give him a chance to fail in his own right rather than attacking based on the presumption of his failure.

 

I read the Mulcair article posted above and I now see their strategy.

But at the same time,I don't want the NDP giving the Cons any real leverage or an easy ride.

Hopefully the strategy works and any move to protect Quebec's face in the government is recognized as the NDP working in the interests of Quebec.

autoworker autoworker's picture

knownothing wrote:

autoworker wrote:

knownothing wrote:

Why did Peggy Nash dodge the Quebec question on Power and Politics? Why didn't she just take the same stand as Jack Layton?

Because discretion is the better part of valour.

Too much discretion is stagnation and avoidance

No doubt each NDP MP outside Quebec will have an opportunity to change feet over the Clarity Act.  Peggy Nash, being one of the smarter and more eloquent kids in the class, managed to avoid stepping in it-- for now.

vaudree

Jack said that there are more announcements to come.  Critic portfolios are not as limited as Cabinet postions in that everyone can get something.  Probably a good plan for Jack not to list everyone at once so that he can dominate the news another day.

Lord Palmerston

Anonymouse wrote:

The issue is not Peggy Nash. I like Peggy Nash. The issue is the whole shadow cabinet or perhaps, the whole caucus. Who are the really strong non-union voices on the economy? As noted, it's good to have union voices, it's just that unions are pretty marginal in the economy as a whole (and even more marginal if we just look at the private sector), who speaks for the other 5/6ths?

Would you have preferred Paul Summerville?

Wilf Day

The young shadow cabinet stars:

Marie-Claude Morin, 26, Housing (Human Resources and Social Development). She has been an actress (with a diploma in theatre), most recently a community development coordinator also completing a university program in Social and Community Work. Born in Trois-Rivieres, she grew up in St. Hyacinthe where she attended high school and worked.

[img]http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/images/Picture.aspx?Item=1444b391-e1cf-41...

Christine Moore, 27, National Defence - Military Procurement (Associate Minister). She is a nurse who served three years in the Canadian Forces. She ran in Abitibi-Temiscamigue (where she was born and lived most of her life) in 2006, 2008 and 2011.

[img]http://www.parl.gc.ca/ParlInfo/images/Picture.aspx?Item=a262f5e7-ed4c-41...

Rathika Sitsabaiesan, 29, Post Secondary Education. She was a vice-president of the Carleton University Students' Association where she bargained for a tuition freeze with the provincial government. She was publicized as rushing out of lecture halls to get to one of her two campus jobs, and having a teaching assistant gig on the side. "Ms. Sitsabaiesan has had to drop her course load down to 60 per cent so that she could afford to stay in school. She takes classes over the summer months as well. Her parents, who live in Mississauga, Ont., can't afford to help finance her education. Saddled with a $22,000 debt from her first couple of years in university, Ms. Sitsabaiesan decided not to take any more loans and instead work her way through school. She has heard too many horror stories of students graduating with $50,000 or more in debt. She works full-time as the operations mangers for the residence association, and has another part-time job on campus." She then went to Queen's for a master's degree in industrial relations, where she worked with the Service Employees' International Union as a researcher and helped the organization to successfully launch the "Justice 4 Janitors" Campaign. She was highly active in student politics at both schools, and has represented the Canadian Federation of Students at the provincial and national levels. Rathika has worked with the Ontario Labour Relations Board as a Labour Relations Conciliator. Most recently she has been working for the University of Toronto Students' Union as Operations Assistant & Coordinator. Born in Sri Lanka, she came to Canada with her family at the age of five. In May 2010, Rathika went to the Philippines along with 22 other Canadian delegates. They came from different sectors from Vancouver to Montreal to be part of The People's International Observer's Mission. They monitored and investigated electoral fraud, and reported back to the international community.

[img]http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/images/Picture.aspx?Item=71e05d35-0093-4f...

 

Wilf Day

National Revenue critic Hoang Mai has been preparing to become an MP for years and oozes confidence.

Quote:
He ran in the same riding in 2008, when he was treasurer of the Quebec wing of the party. He did not give up after losing and even turned down job offers in the belief he would win this time.

The trilingual Montreal-born son of Vietnamese immigrants, Mai is well prepared. He has a master's degree in law and has practised overseas. He has studied economics extensively.

A sports buff, Mai scuba dives, plays hockey and has taught skiing. He is coaching a soccer team in Brossard. He is vegan.

"I feel obviously more Québécois, because at the start I was born there and raised to speak French," he said.

"I feel Québécois but proud to be Canadian also. I love this country.

"Obviously, I want to work hard to represent people in Quebec and defend Quebec's interests because that was the mandate that was given to us. I think if people from Quebec get to know more people from outside of Quebec, they'll understand we're all very much the same in a lot of ways."

[img]http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/images/Picture.aspx?Item=6ae062d7-8142-42...

Lefauve

Why do we call it "the shadow cabinet"?

the name sound evil!
:)

Wilf Day

West Coast Lefty wrote:
I was surprised and disappointed at Atamenko's exclusion as he did great work as AG critic, esp on the food security issue.

Just a guess, but - - he's 66. He might well have told Jack "You've got too many MPs for shadow cabinet, I'll step aside for the new blood."

Wilf Day

The transition team, which included seven caucus members and senior party officials and staff members, was set to hold its first meeting Friday May 20 in Ottawa. It included deputy leader Thomas Mulcair, Hamilton Centre MP David Christopherson, Welland MP Malcolm Allen, New Brunswick MP Yvon Godin, Newfoundland and Labrador MP Jack Harris and B.C. MPs Libby Davies and Jean Crowder.

An inner shadow cabinet?

Wilf Day

Ethan Cox:

Quote:
The NDP shadow cabinet is good. Scary good. These people's intelligence, talent and dedication are going to impress the hell out of Canadians over the next four years, especially in comparison to the Cons front bench.

Today Jack Layton took the first step along the long and winding road to replacing the Conservatives in four years. For my money, it was a damn good first step.

melovesproles

Dewar nullifies foreign policy for the NDP.  He makes it a non-issue.  That sits well with the NDP Toronto leadership team but the fact is the party is in the best position in it's history to provide a genuinely National alternative to the rightwing consensus and by it's own admission it has no differences of "substance" with the Conservative government on foreign policy.  Foreign policy has always been a extremely important issue in Quebec and their leadership would resonate well with much of the left in the ROC.  It's a sad waste of an opportunity that may never exist again.

Aristotleded24

melovesproles wrote:
Dewar nullifies foreign policy for the NDP.  He makes it a non-issue.  That sits well with the NDP Toronto leadership team but the fact is the party is in the best position in it's history to provide a genuinely National alternative to the rightwing consensus and by it's own admission it has no differences of "substance" with the Conservative government on foreign policy.  Foreign policy has always been a extremely important issue in Quebec and their leadership would resonate well with much of the left in the ROC.  It's a sad waste of an opportunity that may never exist again.

Maybe someone should have tried to talk Alexa out of retirement in the last election?

Doug

melovesproles wrote:

Dewar nullifies foreign policy for the NDP.  He makes it a non-issue.  That sits well with the NDP Toronto leadership team but the fact is the party is in the best position in it's history to provide a genuinely National alternative to the rightwing consensus and by it's own admission it has no differences of "substance" with the Conservative government on foreign policy.  Foreign policy has always been a extremely important issue in Quebec and their leadership would resonate well with much of the left in the ROC.  It's a sad waste of an opportunity that may never exist again.

 

Good enough for now while the NDP (hopefully) goes and has a good long think about foreign policy. The party's kind of been making it up as it goes along since the end of the Cold War. That's fine for a third or fourth-place opposition party but not good enough for a party with real hope of becoming the government next time.

Krago

The NDP front bench now consists of: 

  • Davies (Vancouver Kingsway) 
  • Perreault (Montcalm) 
  • Duncan (Edmonton-Strathcona) 
  • Angus (Timmins-James Bay) 
  • Crowder (Nanaimo-Cowichan) 
  • Boulerice (Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie) 
  • Chisholm (Dartmouth-Cole Harbour) 
  • Julian (Burnaby-New Westminster) 
  • Nash (Parkdale-High Park) 
  • Davies (Vancouver East) 
  • Layton (Toronto-Danforth) 
  • Mulcair (Outremont) 
  • Comartin (Windsor-Tecumseh) 
  • Harris (St. John's East) 
  • Dewar (Ottawa Centre) 
  • Chow (Trinity-Spadina) 
  • Godin (Acadie-Bathurst) 
  • Boivin (Gatineau) 
  • Stoffer (Sackville-Eastern Shore) 
  • Christopherson (Hamilton Centre) 
  • Allen (Welland) 

Here's the new House of Commons seating plan.

Krago

Wilf Day wrote:

Let's start with the Official Opposition front bench. With 103 seats, the front bench might be 20 or 21 seats, let's assume 21.

Layton, Mulcair, Davies, Boivin, Harris, Comartin, Masse, Pat Martin, Angus, Crowder, Godin, Christopherson, Nash, Boulerice, Turmel, Cote, Day, Saganash, Moore, Caron, Perreault.

Eight women. Ten Quebecois.

You had 13 correct out of 21.  Seven women. Four Quebecois.

The back row?  Nine women.  Nineteen Quebecois (out of 19).

Malcolm Malcolm's picture

Krago wrote:

The back row?  Nine women.  Nineteen Quebecois (out of 19).

 

Mostly a function of seniority, I expect - although why all women escapes me.

robbie_dee

Krago wrote:
Here's the new House of Commons seating plan.

Poor Elizabeth May gets the very last seat in the House.

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