Systemic sexual misconduct and racism in the military and RCMP and the complicity of the Liberals and generals

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jerrym

Female RCMP officer standing outside the RCMP doctor's office. Sign on door: "The Doctor is IN - Decent. RE: More than 80 complaints have now been received against two former RCMP doctors under investigation for alleged sexual misconduct spanning decades. Jan. 31, 2018

jerrym

In a new report by former Supreme Court Justice Morris Fish, he concludes that sexual misconduct in the Canadian military is so "ersistent, preoccupying and widespread" that attempts to address the problem inside the military are futile until the entire military judicial system is transformed. In the meantime sexual misconduct cases should be handled by the civilian judicial sytem according to Fish. His report is a middle path between the status quo failure and full civilian court control in the long run. 

The civilian system has serious flaws in dealing with sexual misconduct, but it at least avoids the military chain of command, which first involves reporting to your immediate superior, who may be the perpetrator or one of his favourite soldiers. 

In an interview on Power and Politics, Defence Minister Sajjan once again said the government will accept all 107 recommendations in principle but refused to give any timeline of implementation. The Liberal plan obviously is to keep receiving more reports (former Supreme Court Judge Arbour is next) until after the next election and then drop it down the memory hole. After all they have done nothing meaningful on the 2015 retired Supreme Court Justice Marie Deschamps report on sexual misconduct during the six years they have been in power. 

A landmark review of Canada's military justice system says the military can keep its jurisdiction over investigating and prosecuting complaints of sexual assault and misconduct within the military itself — as long as it embraces reforms first. Until it does, said former Supreme Court justice Morris Fish, the civilian criminal justice system should step in where it can to handle criminal cases in the military.

"Sexual misconduct in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) remains persistent, preoccupying and widespread – despite the CAF's repeated attempts to address the problem and to curb its prevalence," Fish wrote in his highly-anticipated report on reforming the military justice system, which was tabled in the House of Commons today. "It has had a traumatic impact on the lives and careers of victims, a corrosive effect on discipline and morale and a marked tendency to undermine public confidence in the CAF's institutional capacity to solve the problem internally." ...

At 400 pages, the report is sweeping in scope. It proposes making the military's top cop, the provost marshal, an independent appointment similar to the RCMP commissioner.

Fish also said that military judges should be civilians, not members of the Armed Forces.

His report appears to be trying to stake out a middle ground between a military that's reluctant to give up authority over its own members and critics who, throughout the misconduct crisis, have been calling for complete civilian oversight of military justice.

At a time when critics and sexual assault survivors have suggested that civilian courts are better placed to deliver justice in the military, Fish reaffirmed the need for a military justice system separate from the civilian one. ...

At 400 pages, the report is sweeping in scope. It proposes making the military's top cop, the provost marshal, an independent appointment similar to the RCMP commissioner.

Fish also said that military judges should be civilians, not members of the Armed Forces.

His report appears to be trying to stake out a middle ground between a military that's reluctant to give up authority over its own members and critics who, throughout the misconduct crisis, have been calling for complete civilian oversight of military justice.

At a time when critics and sexual assault survivors have suggested that civilian courts are better placed to deliver justice in the military, Fish reaffirmed the need for a military justice system separate from the civilian one. ...

"It would, in my view, be inappropriate for the military justice system to continue to investigate or prosecute alleged sexual assaults until it extends to all victims the protections afforded by the [Declaration of Victim's Rights]," the report said. ...

The Department of National Defence has said it is still drawing up the regulations to support Bill C-77 — two years after the legislation was passed. A senior defence official, speaking on background at a technical briefing after the report was tabled in Parliament, defended the amount of time it has taken to address such a key flaw in the military justice system. ...

The Liberal government accepts "in principle" the report's 107 recommendations. It said in a media statement that implementation will begin on 36 of Fish's recommendations in the near term. ...

Sajjan said he is committed to putting an implementation plan for the report before the House of Commons defence committee by the fall. But if recent political speculation holds true, the country could be in the middle of an an election at that time. ...

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/morris-fish-military-justice-sexual-mis...

 

jerrym

Another general, Brig.-Gen Simon Bernard, has been removed from his post, but this time for using the N----- word. If racist comments now also result in removal from a position, how many more generals will fall? As usual the military is closed-mouth about any details.

Six generals and the lieutenant-colonel in charge of the Canadian School of Military Intelligence have already lost their positions over sexual misconduct allegations. 

The chief of defence staff  Jonathan Vance, who evidence shows had been involved in known sexual misconduct cases going back to the 1990s that even involved the birth of two children of his according to the female officer mother as well as other cases as he became chief of staff and held the job for years, of  have to resign in January to be replaced by acting chief of staff Art McDonald, who had to resign less than a month later over his own sexual misconduct. Now his replacement, acting chief of the defence staff Lt.-Gen. Wayne Eyre is in trouble over failing to see nothing wrong with another general, Peter Dawe, giving a letter of recommendation to an officer already convicted of sexual assault on another officer. Dawe was so highly thought of, he was considered a likely future commander-in-chief. 

Lt.-Gen. Christopher Coates,  deputy commander of NORAD, was allowed to retire after the media, not the government, found out he had an affair with a U.S. defence department civilian, which against military regulations that require soldiers not to become sexually involved with people from other militaries in case they are compromised. Lt.-Col. Raphaël Guay, is being investigated for sexual misconduct, although no details what was involved have been released. Retired General Paul Rutherford, chair of the Project Trauma Support board, knowingly hired retired Major Jonathan Hamilton, a registered sex offender convicted of three sexual assaults in two trials, to work in a program for military and first responder women, whose trauma was brought on by sexual assault, thereby giving them even more trauma when they found out who he was. Once again nothing was done about this by the Liberal government until it broke a few days ago in the news.  Lt.-Gen. Christopher Coates, who was  second-in-command at NORAD headquarters in Colorado, who left the military weeks after the reporting of his sexual misconduct. This reflects the passive lets-not-rock-the-boat attitude with which Liberal Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan and Trudeau himself have dealt with the problem over six years. Trudeau himself admitted today that he knew about  Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin's case "for weeks". Fortin led Canada's vaccine logistics at the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC),  and was on TV regularly with Covid annoucements. The Liberal government's cover-it-up attitude until it is revealed by someone else is reflected in the fact the government replaced him with another general with no comment on why until the issue broke in the press. 

The only time the Liberals respond with action is when something becomes public. Sexual misconduct in the military or anywhere will never be rooted out with this approach. This further illustrates the systemic nature of sexual abuse and misconduct in the military with the senior command's ignoring or even being the perpetrators for decades while Liberal and Conservative governments looked the other way including under Trudeau during his six years in power. We are also now also seeing how systemic racism in the military, as well as the RCMP, has been ignored or even practiced by the military and RCMP leaders, and ignored by Defence Minister Sajjan and the Trudeau Liberal government for their six years in office.

A senior member of the Canadian Armed Forces was quietly removed from his role in Canada's vaccine rollout last month in response to a complaint that he had used racist language in a workplace setting, CBC News has learned.

Brig.-Gen. Simon Bernard left his role at the Public Health Agency of Canada on May 17 — just three days after Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin left his post leading Canada's vaccine logistics.

Sources tell CBC News that Bernard is accused of using the N-word in a workplace setting sometime in 2020, before his secondment to the public health agency. The complaint was made recently, while Bernard was Fortin's second-in-command in vaccine and logistics planning. Bernard was appointed to that post in November.

In a media statement, the Department of National Defence (DND) confirmed that Bernard was the subject of "a complaint regarding language" and the armed forces is "working towards determining facts and next steps."

"In order to preserve the integrity of the effort, we will not be disclosing the nature of the complaint," said Daniel Le Bouthillier, DND head of media relations.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/simon-bernard-dany-fortin-vaccine-phac-...

 

jerrym

ETA: Nothing shows the trivialization of sexual misconduct in the military and the depth of the systemic discrimination against women that pervades the entire military command structure, than the resignation of yet another general. This time, it was the second-in-command, Lt.-General Michael Rouleau, who despite being in charge of the military police that are responsible for investigating the many cases of sexual misconduct involving the military's generals, went golfing at an exclusive military golf course (why is there such a thing) with former commander-in-chief General Vance, who had to resign over well-documented allegations of sexual misconduct. Nothing shows how blind these generals are to the problem than the fact that Rouleau said Vice-Admiral C A Baines did not have to also resign, because he had invited Baines to accompany him and Vance golfing, as if that excused Baines for not using his own judgement to realize that going golfing with an allegedly sexually offending former general would be seen as another sign of the good ol' boys signaling that sexual misconduct and abuse was nothing to worry about, if you were a senior officer. After all, the only thing Rouleau and Baines were doing was engaging in “a private activity” that, in golfing with Vance, involved “reaching out to a retired member of the CAF to ensure his wellness.”

Funny, how they never reach out to the thousands of rank and file sexually abused military personnel. Funny how Trudeau, Sajjan and the rest of the Liberals never seem to get around to dealing with systemic problem of sexual abuse in the military. After six years of inaction following a report that arrived at the same time the Liberals took office,  they have become very practiced at pronouncing some fine words on the issue, but only when the media or a sexually abused person reveals what another general or admiral has done. And when it happens again and again and again, then Trudeau and Sajjan quickly speak some more fine words.  

The second-in-command of the Canadian Forces is resigning following condemnation over his decision to go golfing with Gen. Jonathan Vance while the latter remains under military police investigation.

Lt.-Gen. Mike Rouleau was set to hand over command as vice chief of the defence staff to Lt.-Gen. Frances Allen shortly, who will be replacing him and who will be the first woman to hold the role.

But over the last two days, Rouleau — who holds oversight authority over the military police — has been roundly criticized for going golfing with Vance amid the ongoing probe into allegations of inappropriate behaviour against the former chief of the defence staff, which Vance denies.

Global News and The Globe and Mail first reported on the golfing on Saturday night.

“As a result of this incident, I am stepping aside immediately as VCDS and will transition to the CAF Transition Group,” Rouleau said in a statement. ...

Vice-Adm. C.A. Baines, commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, was also part of that golf outing at the Hylands golf course in east Ottawa on June 2.  Baines issued a statement on Sunday night in which he apologized but also described his actions as a “public display of support.”

Rouleau said Baines likely wouldn’t have gone if he had not done so.

“I wish to tell you that I accept fully how my decision to do so has intensified recent events and contributed to further erosion of trust. Vice-Admiral Baines’ participation was surely predicated on my attending therefore I would ask that only I be held accountable,” Rouleau said. ...

He described the golf outing as “a private activity” and that he had been “reaching out to a retired member of the CAF to ensure his wellness.”

https://globalnews.ca/news/7948266/canadian-forces-mike-rouleau-golfing-...

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