Welcome to B.C., Premier Notley, or, does the NDP have a death wish?

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epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

First Nations chief at heart of oilsands resistance says he's no environmentalist

For years, Chief Allan Adam, leader of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, has been labeled an environmentalist.

He has fought hard to investigate mysterious illnesses plaguing his people who live near major oilsands development and other industrial activity in Northern Alberta. He has been an outspoken critic of both governments and industry for not doing enough to protect public health from industrial pollution.

Provincial statistics have confirmed cases of rare forms of cancer in the town of Fort Chipewyan, about 300 kilometres north of the oilsands hub of Fort McMurray. Scientific research has also shown that local food sources contain carcinogens, but federal and provincial governments have repeatedly downplayed such risks.

quote:

He is leaving the door open to joining other North American First Nations who have signed the "Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion" which requires its members to oppose new projects that will lead to radical expansion of the industry. It will depend on whether the people from his First Nation support signing on, he said.

Although many perceive this alliance as being an anti-development effort to stop all new pipelines and shut down production in Alberta's oilsands, home to the world's third largest crude reserves after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela, Adam said the treaty actually promotes sustainable development.

"We’re for development if it’s done in a sustainable, right way that’s going to benefit everybody," he said. "But the fact remains that we can’t keep doing it at the price that we’re paying right now when they continue to bury people back home."

Among the initial signatories to the treaty was the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North Dakota, which has been opposing construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline. The document now has 120 signatories in North America and members hope to recruit some members from Alberta in 2017.

NorthReport

Accessible pool of voters for Liberals nearly 20 points higher than for the Conservatives or NDP (December 9, 2016) says Nanos this morning. My one surprise is that they even mention the NDP any more. 

quizzical

there's a child care and living poverty crisis across BC but people suffering from upper class mentality vote against their own best interest.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

John Steinbeck once wrote words to the effect that socialism wasn't as successful in the USA as it should have been because poor people were brainwashed to view themselves "as temporarily embarrassed millionaires" ...

Sounds similar.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..what i believe these days is that there is a need for a new and different economy. one that isn't just profit driven. i am really not sure that the bc ndp are up to the task but at least they are talking about it.

Time to Replace Out-of-Touch Government, John Horgan Says

quote:

Related to the economy, could you tell me about what you were doing in Italy last summer?

I was invited by Vancity Credit Union to participate in a tour of Bologna, which is the centre of the co-operative movement in Europe, certainly in Italy.... It was just an opportunity to look at alternative ways of stimulating economic activity that were not necessarily always profit driven, but profit sharing in the case of co-operatives.

What I came back with, energized, was looking at the housing crisis in British Columbia, that co-operative housing has been a key part of the puzzle in B.C. over the decades, but has not seen much activity over the past couple of terms of federal and provincial governments, and I would like to see that reinvigorated.

Are there other places the co-operative model could be well applied in B.C.?

In some of the site visits we went to, seniors’ care was one where you had the workers, the social workers, the care aides, the therapists, occupational therapists — all [as] part and parcel of the operation. You had administrators making sure the facility was resourced and the people that participated in the delivery of the services were invested in the outcomes. That made them happier employees because they were able to make suggestions amongst themselves on how they could improve the delivery of the services, and then they went about doing it.... Everybody was participating in the decision-making. That model really appealed to me.

Sean in Ottawa

quizzical wrote:

there's a child care and living poverty crisis across BC but people suffering from upper class mentality vote against their own best interest.

Sorry for drift but the linked reference to driving is meaningful.

I have always driven smaller/older cars. There would always be a few who would be aggressive. Now I find the difference in size of vehicles is greater than ever and the tolerence for smaller less capable cars on roads is less than ever.

Now somebody with massive a heavy SUV with all the features and latest tires seems less likely to tolerate someone slowing down even slightly in poor road conditions and basically tailgates you till you drive off the road.

No longer is it about being able to keep up with the conditions- it is about being able to do it at the speed of the fastest jackass on the road. It is like an arms race on the roads.

Increasingly, I find that in bad weather I can handle the road but not the other drivers and realize that I cannot drive safely.

***

All that said, I was not fond of the suburbanite comment in the link. The burbs are where people of modest incomes have gone once the centre got cleaned up and gentrified. It used to be that suburbs were the middle to upper income range with both lower and higher income people living in the centre. Not true now. Lower income people and families have largely been pushed out of the downtowns which are increasingly for the very well off. So while suberbanite was a classist term in the past -- it is now referring to a different class than it used to -- and more than one.

People who want a big ass house go to the burbs and people who cannot afford to live in the centre also go to the burbs. It is an uneasy cohabitation at times becuase they have opposing interests on public transit and many other issues.

Sean in Ottawa

Geoff wrote:

NorthReport wrote:

Accessible pool of voters for Liberals nearly 20 points higher than for the Conservatives or NDP (December 9, 2016) says Nanos this morning. My one surprise is that they even mention the NDP any more. 

The good news is that the election isn't until 2019, so the Nanos poll is meaningless. However, if one insists on paying attention to them, at least wait until the NDP elects a new leader. At that point the polls might reveal something interesting about how the NDP is faring with the public (altrhough I wouldn't bet the bank on it).

North Report is still singing a one-note song. Just these days it is a different note than it used to be.

Geoff

NorthReport wrote:

Accessible pool of voters for Liberals nearly 20 points higher than for the Conservatives or NDP (December 9, 2016) says Nanos this morning. My one surprise is that they even mention the NDP any more. 

The good news is that the election isn't until 2019, so the Nanos poll is meaningless. However, if one insists on paying attention to them, at least wait until the NDP elects a new leader. At that point the polls might reveal something interesting about how the NDP is faring with the public (although I wouldn't bet the bank on it).

quizzical

Sean in Ottawa wrote:
quizzical wrote:
there's a child care and living poverty crisis across BC but people suffering from upper class mentality vote against their own best interest.

All that said, I was not fond of the suburbanite comment in the link.

i kinda found it outdated too but the mental state and premise contained are real.

i was looking for a labelling term to encompass wth is going on with people and their failing to take care of their best interests and vote against themselves. a good example is voting for billionaires who've driven the world into chaos to change things.

if we can't name it we can't change it.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

Canada is a country of "company men" and "company women" who go with whatever is good for the Boss. Do you want to lose your job or take a pay cut? Do you want to lose your job and vote NDP? Do you want to join a union and lose your job?

In some European countries, many people are convinced they live in a "Socialist Country", and they say "I live in a Socialist Country". There tend to be lots of unions there, government services are good, and there is little poverty as I experience it here.

Until then, we have to say "Canada is a conservative country", because that is what it is.

Sean in Ottawa

quizzical wrote:

Sean in Ottawa wrote:
quizzical wrote:
there's a child care and living poverty crisis across BC but people suffering from upper class mentality vote against their own best interest.

All that said, I was not fond of the suburbanite comment in the link.

i kinda found it outdated too but the mental state and premise contained are real.

i was looking for a labelling term to encompass wth is going on with people and their failing to take care of their best interests and vote against themselves. a good example is voting for billionaires who've driven the world into chaos to change things.

if we can't name it we can't change it.

I see the problem.

Certainly, it is true that the right (and so-called centre) only govern by getting others either not to vote at all or to vote for policies that hurt them.

The Liberals in particular work hard to get people to vote for them by articulating the problem and making promises but delivering policies that maintain the problem rather than fix it. This is the reason, I think, why those left of centre frequently detest Liberals more than Conservatives -- it is often how I feel. Conservatives at least don't pretend to offer progressive policies and so do not take votes they ahve no intention of honouring.

Recently many people saw the NDP as unrecognizable and opted to support the Liberals, forgetting their bait and switch nature. This is where we are now, waiting for the population to recognize that they have been had. Again.

This is why, even as frustrated as I have been I vote NDP in the hope of an improvement becuase I have no hope that the Liberals will change. They are essentially in the way of any progress. This is a familiar pattern.

The NDP (or some replacement if needed) must offer and fight for truly life-changing policies. Too often the party backs this vision rhetorically but offers little of imediate and significant substance. In the last election it actually offered quite a lot (allbeit over too long a period) but did not have the leader truly defend and fight for this vision.

In the end the NDP cannot make mistakes as it is the only one that has the potential to actually make a difference -- in my view. It is also held often to a higher standard.

More voter awareness of track records and better analysis of proposals would lead to more voter awareness and fewer votes against the person's interest.

 

quizzical

the NDP offered life changing programs and policies for example a national day care stategy.

now 1 year after the election families with young children many of whom most likely voted for Trudeau are having child care difficulties and taking to the news about how they have to enlist their parents to step in. they say costs have gone up like 17%. where the hell is their disconnect?

and now we've got a Chinese business here in BC looking to buy a chain of long term care facilities. so we've got governments subsidizing long term care franchises with health care dollars??????

next up in BC is the new loan first time home buyers can take out to use as a down payment on a home worth up to 750,000.00. wth?

Sean in Ottawa

quizzical wrote:

the NDP offered life changing programs and policies for example a national day care stategy.

now 1 year after the election families with young children many of whom most likely voted for Trudeau are having child care difficulties and taking to the news about how they have to enlist their parents to step in. they say costs have gone up like 17%. where the hell is their disconnect?

and now we've got a Chinese business here in BC looking to buy a chain of long term care facilities. so we've got governments subsidizing long term care franchises with health care dollars??????

next up in BC is the new loan first time home buyers can take out to use as a down payment on a home worth up to 750,000.00. wth?

I agree they offered these. In fact it was frustrating to see how several strong life-changing policies were in the NDP program, but they failed to truly campaign on them. This I blamed the leader for. The party itself had crafted a very good and worthy list of policies, not a perfect schedule of implementation (could have been more ambitious) but the leader spoke little of these during his speeches. He would mention them but spend the bulk of his time on other things. As well the attacks on the Liberals were often incompetent -- spent on less important things. The leader never truly challenged the Liberals on their middle class tax cut which has been nothing more than a transfer to the top ten percent coming from both the top 1 percent and the entire rest of the spectrum. The Liberal family tax breaks were much less meaningful than the childcare proposals from the NDP but Mulcair only presented this contrast in a fashion I felt was uninspired and inept. Mulcair was not saddled with a bad plan. He had a good one and bungled the campaign. This is why I turned against him.

I want the next leader to engage these important life changing policies with authenticity, passion, undeniable committment and the confidence to place them at the front of the campaign.

I still believe that the NDP platform of the last election was a potential winner. I am not certain that Mulcair felt that way. The only major way it would have been better would have been to have a more ambitious implementation.

Generally, despite some clashes, I think you and I agree on the bulk of the NDP initiatives. However, I point to the difference between the focus of the platform and the focus of the leader's campaign which was what most Canadians saw of the platform. I think it is unfair to say that Canadians rejected the NDP platform as I think they never really got to know it. That is on the leader in my view.

NorthReport

Notley looks like she might be on a roll these days. Even Keystone is now being bandied about by the Trump regime.

NorthReport

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