NDP: preparing for the 2015 election campaign

121 posts / 0 new
Last post
PrairieDemocrat15

Unionist wrote:

Federal minimum wage? What a joke.

It would only apply to federal jurisdiction sectors (broadcasting, banks, inter-prov or international transportation, a few others). And in those sectors, in case you haven't guessed, minimum wage is not a problem. The problem is in retail, domestic services, agriculture, etc. - none of them would be affected.

Last study I saw (some years ago) said that something like 0.1% of federally regulated employees were earning minimum wage or less (which currently means, the minimum wage of their province or territory) - i.e. a few hundred workers across Canada - compared to provincial jurisdiction, where it is closer to 5% - that is, 50 times as many in percentage terms. I don't know if there's a more recent survey.

What happened to the anti-scab legislation which Layton's caucus was pushing? They found a meaningless alternative?? What about concrete measures to protect free collective bargaining, vs. the spate of back-to-work legislation which Harper has resurrected in recent years (air, rail, post)??

Who is advising these people???

You always find the positives, Unionist.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

It is obvious that the central office is finally getting nervous and are trying to set the tone of the discourse.  I wish them good luck in getting the corporate and state media to pay attention and talk issues rather than about the horse race and the horse's mane.

As for Unionist's concerns I guess it all depends on the definition of KEY plank.  A federal minimum wage is a great thing but hardly key in any sense of the word. It is certainly low on the list of prioriies for union activists so why woud Unionist be impressed with window dressing in his area of concern?

Unionist

PrairieDemocrat15 wrote:

You always find the positives, Unionist.

Ok, I'll bite. Tell me the positive side of a federal minimum wage, please.

PrairieDemocrat15

I agree with Kropotkin's second paragraph.

Unionist, I don't doubt federal minimum wage is small potatos, but I don't see the need to be so negative about this announcement,  especially since it is only one plank of a platform that will include major commitments on healthcare, infrastructure, and child care.  

If the NDP were smart, they would use the relatively minor federal minimum wage issue to appeal to living wage activists. Supporting a $15 federal minimum wage would be an important (and symbolic) commitment for the NDP, which would greatly differentiate them from Trudeau's blue Liberals. 

Also, I'm sure there are plenty of people working in radio and broadcasting, for example, who are being underpaid. 

Unionist

PrairieDemocrat15 wrote:

Unionist, I don't doubt federal minimum wage is small potatos, but I don't see the need to be so negative about this announcement,  especially since it is only one plank of a platform that will include major commitments on healthcare, infrastructure, and child care. 

It's not small potatoes. It's a diversion to point to and say, we're doing something about poverty. Or something. It does nothing.

Quote:
Supporting a $15 federal minimum wage would be an important (and symbolic) commitment for the NDP, which would greatly differentiate them from Trudeau's blue Liberals.

So - federally regulated employees in Manitoba (for example) would be getting minimum $15, while provincially regulated employees would be getting $10.70 from the provincial NDP government? Should be very interesting. Not gonna happen.

Quote:
Also, I'm sure there are plenty of people working in radio and broadcasting, for example, who are being underpaid. 

Who are getting less than the minimum wage in the province in which they're working? Ya think? I don't think so.

As for your $15 hypothesis, I'm calling BS. When push comes to shove (as it did in the Ontario election), we see where cowards really stand on minimum wage legislation.

 

thorin_bane

Always glad I pop into these conversations with unionist taking pot shots regardless of any stand the NDP takes. Very refreshing change from the usual.

Sean in Ottawa

Glad to know they will put down detail. Will wait to see what that is.

sherpa-finn

On the substantive issue Unionist raises above re the significance of raising the federal minuimum wage as an anti-poverty measure, here is the conclusion of a Library of Parliament Background Paper on this very issue from 2008

It is estimated that approximately one tenth of one percent of all employees covered under Part III of the Canada Labour Code [i.e., federally regulated industries] are paid the federal minimum wage or less.  Moreover, it is thought that a very small proportion of federally regulated workers earn less than $10 per hour.  Given the risk of adverse employment effects, the small number of federally regulated workers earning the minimum wage and the low incidence of minimum wage workers among the working poor, it would seem that the federal minimum wage is, at best, a weak policy instrument for addressing the issue of low income among federally regulated workers, let alone the labour market as a whole.  A more effective and broad-based approach for raising the incomes of Canada’s working poor might be found in earnings supplementation schemes such as the recently introduced Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB).

http://www.parl.gc.ca/content/lop/researchpublications/prb0839-e.htm

The paper as a whole is an interesting read. I was surprised by the stat cited re % of total workers paid the minimum wage - it was only 5% in 2007. I believe that figure is now around 6.7% - so a significant rise (one third) in the proportion of workers now receiving the minimium wage over the term of the Harper Gov't. That should be worth flagging in a campaign... even if increasing the federal minimum wage is not much of a policy response.

 

sherpa-finn

Two media pieces on NDP positioning and strategy for 2015:

A CBC (Rosemary Barton) article on the plan to get Mulcair out of the House of Commons when the PM isn't there.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/tom-mulcair-to-venture-out-of-the-house-in-a-bid-to-raise-profile-1.2760019

And a G+M video piece on How Mulcair could beat Harper and Trudeau in 2015. (Basically Brad Lavigne making the case that "Being PM is not an entry-level job") 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/video/globe-now/video-globe-now/article20490724/

 

Debater

Looks like Mulcair is following Trudeau's lead by realizing that you connect with voters on the campaign trail by understanding their issues.

This indicates the NDP realizes they have been losing ground and need to change their strategy.  So perhaps they are taking a hint from those such as Chantal Hébert who have written some constructive criticism pieces lately.

Unionist

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Glad to know they will put down detail. Will wait to see what that is.

What do you mean, you'll wait to see what it is? Where do they get their labour platforms from? Some secret boiler room? Don't they have conventions, policy resolutions... What is this, some magic act?

They don't need to listen to the union movement on every issue. But they do need to listen to workers, and members, and supporters... Who came up with this idea that the federal minimum wage needs changing - and what happened to the rest of their platform on workers' issues? If this is the most important plank, it's rather bad news.

 

Unionist

sherpa-finn wrote:

The paper as a whole is an interesting read. I was surprised by the stat cited re % of total workers paid the minimum wage - it was only 5% in 2007. I believe that figure is now around 6.7% - so a significant rise (one third) in the proportion of workers now receiving the minimium wage over the term of the Harper Gov't. That should be worth flagging in a campaign... even if increasing the federal minimum wage is not much of a policy response.

 

That paper confirms what I've been saying - thanks for digging it up, sherpa-finn.

But I'm not sure how flagging the provincial stats (which represents almost all the 6.7% figure) would achieve much in a federal campaign. You'd have to show how some federal policy would increase wages for provincially regulated workers. Tough leap.

 

sherpa-finn

According to teh French media, Hans Marotte, a well known Montreal lawyer and activist on the rights of the unemployed plans to run for the NDP in 2015 in a Montreal area riding. (In 2000 he ran in the Papineau-St Denis riding now held by Justin Trudeau).  Marotte has strong roots in the sovereignty and French language rights movements, which will add an interesting dimension to his candidacy.

In terms of other Quebec ridings, there is still a fair amount of uncertainty around likely candidates. To the best of my knowledge, only two sitting members have indicated they will not run again - Marie-Claude Morin in Saint-Hyacinthe–Bagot and Tarik Brahmi in Saint-Jean.

There are also the four seats won by the NDP in 2011 but for which the elected MPs have since "moved on":  Sana Hassainia in Verchères-Les Patriotes (now sitting as an independent); Claude Patry (The Last Bloquiste?) in Jonquière-Alma - who apparently will not re-offer; Lise St-Denis (Liberal) in Saint-Maurice–Champlain; and Manon Perreault in Montcalm who is currently suspended from caucus due to legal issues.

And no doubt the party also has eyes on those seats won by the Bloq in 2011.

sherpa-finn

On  the subject of candidates for the forthcoming federal election, I would have thought that this Fall should be High Season for nominating candidates and launching local campaigns.  I have no idea if a master list is held somewhere of nominated NDP candidates (certainly cannot find it on the party website). 

But FWIW, here are 7 announcements I have seen go by in recent weeks on social media (with * indicating sitting MPs). Hopefully there are others!

In BC:

Bill Sundu in Kamloops--Thompson--Cariboo

Jacqui Gingras  in North Okanagan-Shuswap

Natasha Bob  in Nanaimo-Ladysmith,

* Don Davies in Vancouver-Kingsway

* Peter Julian in Burnaby-New Westminster

Alberta:

Janis Irwin in Edmonton #Griesbach.

 

Saskatchewan:

Nial Kuyek in Regina-Qu'Appelle

 

sherpa-finn

Unionist wrote: I'm not sure how flagging the provincial stats (which represents almost all the 6.7% figure) would achieve much in a federal campaign. You'd have to show how some federal policy would increase wages for provincially regulated workers. Tough leap.

Perhaps. I just think the fact that the % of Cndn workers earning minimum wage has increased by 1/3 over the term of the Harper Gov't is a message that usefully plays to the Opposition narrative that the CPC Gov't / agenda feeds unequal and inequitable economic growth. This will be an important element (IMHO) of challenging the CPC line that they are the only ones who can be trusted to manage the economy. As in "Managing it for whom??"

Now, getting prescriptive about what an NDP Gov't (or LPC for that matter) should do differently is another question.... to which we can agree that increasing the federal minimum wage is a rather inadequate policy response. 

If I was a wholly cynical party hack I might be tempted to suggest that most workers / voters probably do not have a clear sense of whether they work in a federally or provincially regulated industry. So a policy announcement raising the federal min wage may actually play well with the public even if it won't make much difference to people's pocketbooks. (Not unlike many of the CPC tax cuts.)

But I am not, so I won't.

Webgear

War veteran Bruce Moncur has announced he will running for the NDP Windsor-Tecumseh candidacy in next year's federal election.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/bruce-moncur-to-run-for-ndp-candid...

thorin_bane

Webgear wrote:

War veteran Bruce Moncur has announced he will running for the NDP Windsor-Tecumseh candidacy in next year's federal election.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/bruce-moncur-to-run-for-ndp-candid...

Joe comartins seat. I have written to Joe about the NDP foreign policy but never got a response from my MP, even told the national campiagn that they haven't even given me a preformed reply to any of the three emails I have sent to various NDP areas..dewar!

They need to get on top of this. If supporters are feeling not listened to I can only imagine someone who doesn't volunteer or send money?

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

The few times I've written to NDP portfolio MPs with concerns or dissatisfaction over foreign policy positions, I've rarely received a repsonse (if lucky, a form acknowlegement). For awhile, I had a pretty good rapport with Pat Martin's staff when he was my MP but that changed over time when I began to get critical about the NDP's non-position on Israel's behaviour.

benhart benhart's picture

sherpa-finn wrote:

On  the subject of candidates for the forthcoming federal election, I would have thought that this Fall should be High Season for nominating candidates and launching local campaigns.  I have no idea if a master list is held somewhere of nominated NDP candidates (certainly cannot find it on the party website). 

But FWIW, here are 7 announcements I have seen go by in recent weeks on social media (with * indicating sitting MPs). Hopefully there are others!

In BC:

Bill Sundu in Kamloops--Thompson--Cariboo

Jacqui Gingras  in North Okanagan-Shuswap

Natasha Bob  in Nanaimo-Ladysmith,

* Don Davies in Vancouver-Kingsway

* Peter Julian in Burnaby-New Westminster

Alberta:

Janis Irwin in Edmonton #Griesbach.

 

Saskatchewan:

Nial Kuyek in Regina-Qu'Appelle

 

Sherpa-finn Natasha bob has not won the nomination in Nanaimo-Ladysmith the nomination meeting hasn't been called there yet. There are some nominated candidates you missedWink 

British Columbia:

Bill Sundhu: Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo

Jacqui Gingras: North Okanagan-Shuswap

Don Davies: Vancouver-Kingsway

Kennedy Stewart: Burnaby-South

Larry Koopman: West Vancouver–Sunshine Coast–Sea to Sky Country

Jinny Sims: Surrey–Newton

Jasbir Sandhu: Surrey Centre

Peter Julian: New Westminster–Burnaby

Nathan Cullen: Skeena–Bulkley Valley

Alberta:

Janis Irwin: Edmonton Griesbach

Cheryl Meheden: Lethbridge

Michael Connolly: Calgary Midnapore

Saskatchewan:

Nial Kuyek: Regina–Qu'Appelle

Erin Weir: Regina–Lewvan

Manitoba:

Daniel Blaikie: Elmwood–Transcona

Ontario:

Irene Mathyssen: London Fanshawe

Brian Masse: Windsor West

Wayne Marston: Hamilton East–Stoney Creek

Quebéc:

Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe: Pierrefonds–Dollard

Hélène LeBlanc: LaSalle–Émard–Verdun

Mylène Freeman: Mirabel

 

 

PrairieDemocrat15

Andrew Ference addressed the NDP Caucus in Edmonton, tells them to reach out to and respect marginalized people.

Ference's speech: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/edmonton/Video+Oilers+Andrew+Ference...

While he made clear he is not promoting any one party and said he agrees with different parties on different issues, I think it is safe to say the Oilers' captain has left-leaning sympathies. He was the first Oiler to march in the Edmonton Pride Parade, has worked with David Suzuki on environmental issues, and set-up the NHL Players' Association carbon-offset purchase program. This is also, not the first NDP gathering he has attended.

He is quite engaded with political issues and says he is not "closing any doors" on a political career once he is done with hockey: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/nhler-andrew-ference-shares-captain-s-pe...

I actually didn't know about his appearence at the 2009 NDP convention or his envionmentalist streak. I did hear an interview he did on CBC Radio (it was not about hockey) and thought to myself this guy is very informed, passonate, and progressive. Learning more about his history further convinced be he is a fellow traveller, so to speak. Glad to have him on my team; Oilers, that is. I'd be even more pleased if he joined the orange team down the road.

sherpa-finn

Thanks, benhart. And I see you have opened a separate thread for tracking candidates. That is helpful.

Apologies for the misinformation on Natasha Bob in Nanaimo-Ladysmith: her Twitter profile describes her as "NDP candidate for Nanaimo Ladysmith".  But I see now that the nomination meeting for that constituency is Oct 5th. So I guess she means "a candidate to be the candidate"!

Aristotleded24

[url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYWf-lrnfsg]Do you have your Orange Crush?[/url]

PrairieDemocrat15

I saw a tweet from a one "Cannibisdad" which said "Universal childcare make be care less about cannibis legalization." Its only one person, but it think a lot of people share such views. Mulcair needs to put childcare at the centre of his campaign, along with promising to cancel the Canada-China FIPA. These are vote winners. Potenital Liberal, Green, and Bloc voters support these positions. Plus, many Conseravtives are nationalist and protectionist and oppose the surender of soverignty that trade agreeements demand.

Debater

sherpa-finn wrote:

According to teh French media, Hans Marotte, a well known Montreal lawyer and activist on the rights of the unemployed plans to run for the NDP in 2015 in a Montreal area riding. (In 2000 he ran in the Papineau-St Denis riding now held by Justin Trudeau).  Marotte has strong roots in the sovereignty and French language rights movements, which will add an interesting dimension to his candidacy.

If Marotte is a sovereigntist, isn't that likely to create a few headaches for the NDP?  A potential Claude Patry?

Quote:

In terms of other Quebec ridings, there is still a fair amount of uncertainty around likely candidates. To the best of my knowledge, only two sitting members have indicated they will not run again - Marie-Claude Morin in Saint-Hyacinthe–Bagot and Tarik Brahmi in Saint-Jean.

Is there a retirement announcement by Tarik Brahmi?  I've read that Marie-Claude Morin is departing, but I haven't seen Tarik Brahmi listed yet.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42nd_Canadian_federal_election#Incumbent_MP...

Quote:

There are also the four seats won by the NDP in 2011 but for which the elected MPs have since "moved on":  Sana Hassainia in Verchères-Les Patriotes (now sitting as an independent); Claude Patry (The Last Bloquiste?) in Jonquière-Alma - who apparently will not re-offer; Lise St-Denis (Liberal) in Saint-Maurice–Champlain; and Manon Perreault in Montcalm who is currently suspended from caucus due to legal issues.

Have Sana Hassainia and Manon Perreault decided for sure what they are doing yet?  I assume Perreault would need to get her legal issue cleared up by 2015 in order to run for the NDP again.  Hassainia is leaving according to some sources, but hasn't decided yet according to others.

Quote:

And no doubt the party also has eyes on those seats won by the Bloq in 2011.

I'm sure the Liberals are, too.  With the Liberals ahead in Québec right now, there's the potential for Liberal pick-ups.  Ahuntsic (changing to Ahuntsic-Cartierville in 2015) is a former BQ/Liberal seat that could go Liberal in 2015, particularly if Mourani doesn't run again.

mmphosis

Sunday October 5th seems like an important date.

scott16

mmphosis wrote:

Sunday October 5th seems like an important date.

Why is that?

mmphosis

party nominations

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

PrairieDemocrat15 wrote:

Andrew Ference addressed the NDP Caucus in Edmonton, tells them to reach out to and respect marginalized people.

Ference's speech: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/edmonton/Video+Oilers+Andrew+Ference...

While he made clear he is not promoting any one party and said he agrees with different parties on different issues, I think it is safe to say the Oilers' captain has left-leaning sympathies. He was the first Oiler to march in the Edmonton Pride Parade, has worked with David Suzuki on environmental issues, and set-up the NHL Players' Association carbon-offset purchase program. This is also, not the first NDP gathering he has attended.

He is quite engaded with political issues and says he is not "closing any doors" on a political career once he is done with hockey: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/nhler-andrew-ference-shares-captain-s-pe...

I actually didn't know about his appearence at the 2009 NDP convention or his envionmentalist streak. I did hear an interview he did on CBC Radio (it was not about hockey) and thought to myself this guy is very informed, passonate, and progressive. Learning more about his history further convinced be he is a fellow traveller, so to speak. Glad to have him on my team; Oilers, that is. I'd be even more pleased if he joined the orange team down the road.

Thanks. My respect for him just climbed.

Always hated him for flipping the bird to the fans at the Bell Centre a few years ago but I can forgive and forget.

I guess we deserved it anyway for the incessantly obnoxious Olé Olé Olé.

Winston

PrairieDemocrat15 wrote:

Andrew Ference addressed the NDP Caucus in Edmonton, tells them to reach out to and respect marginalized people.

...

Glad to have him on my team; Oilers, that is. I'd be even more pleased if he joined the orange team down the road.

Orange IS one of the Oilers' colours, is it not?

scott16

can anyone tell me what party nominations are on October 5th?

scott16

can someone from New Brunswick tell me why the Federal NDP has no nominated candidates? Is it because of the Provincial election?

sherpa-finn

The joys of cycling in the nation's capital....

Tom Mulcair’s chief of staff seriously injured in collision

http://thechronicleherald.ca/canada/1237637-tom-mulcair-s-chief-of-staff-seriously-injured-in-collision#.VB0gXkw3B9k.twitter

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair’s right hand man is in hospital after a serious bicycle accident.

Mulcair’s chief of staff Raoul Gebert was hit by a car on Rideau Street in Ottawa while biking home late Wednesday night. He broke his shoulder blade and a bone in his hand...

Brachina

That sucks, but he'll be alright thankfully. Hope he has a speedy recovery.

sherpa-finn

If there is one issue that the NDP should "own" in the public mind, - it is health care. This story (splashed across the front page of today's Ottawa Citizen" only underlines for me the fact that the NDP needs to make the rebuilding / financing of healthcare a central issue of the 2015 campaign and a central plan of the party platform.

(The only upside to the news story is the cold comfort that comes from knowing that even former deputy prime ministers get placed on gurneys in the hospital hallways, alongside the carpenter and autoworker. "Socialism as its best", I suspect our conservative friends would say.)

Herb Gray's widow says he waited 48 hours in emergency for a bed

Former deputy prime minister Herb Gray, who was a member of Parliament when medicare was adopted in 1966, was forced to wait in the emergency room at The Ottawa Hospital on a stretcher for 48 hours before being moved to a bed, his widow Sharon Sholzberg-Gray says...

Sholzberg-Gray, a lawyer who was president of the Canadian Healthcare Association in the late 1990s, said even a career as an advocate for changes that were needed in the health-care system didn’t prepare her for the stress and anxiety of having a frail loved one on a stretcher in emergency for so long...

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/herb-grays-widow-says-he-waited-48-hours-in-emergency-for-a-bed

 

sherpa-finn

And on the trade deal front, my hunch is that the NDP endorsement of the South Korea trade deal is largely a political counterpoint to an imminent rejection by the NDP of the CETA deal. 

This positions Mulcair to make the case in the 2015 campaign that the NDP is not for or against trade deals per se. But takes a critical look at each proposal on a case by case basis re what's in the best interests of the most Canadians - and decides accordingly.  Vs the line of the Gov't and Liberals which seems to be to embrace each and every deal, regardless of content and provisions.  

Not a bad wedge issue on the economic front.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Mulcair stated on Power and Politics Friday that the NDP approved the Korean deal largely because it can be cancelled on 6 months notice, unlike the CETA (20 years, I think he said) and FIPA (30 years).

Brachina

 Makes sense, if the deal turns out to be unsatisfying or problematic, we can just get out of it. Personally though I don't concider treaties that lock democractic governments into long term deals that can cripple the actions of future governments either.

sherpa-finn

I suspect that this weekend's NDP rally in Sudbury provides a good indication of key messages over the year ahead:

(Good report in local paper: http://www.northernlife.ca/news/localNews/2014/09/27-mulcair-sudbury.aspx )

- Mulcair trying to define himself in the eyes and minds of Canadians: "No one ever gave me anything, unlike Justin;

-  Reminding Canadians about thr Liberal track record of broken promises, using the old Peanuts analogy of Lucy promising she won't pull the football back at the last minute – only to do it, every time.

- Challenging the Harper record on both domestic (health care + fiscal) and international (war / military) fronts.

As discussed in another thread, part of the challenge Mulcair and the NDP faces is nicely captured in this CBC piece by Eric Grenier, our favourite poll consolidator: Tom Mulcair's polls dilemma: Canadians like him, but will they vote for him?

 http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/tom-mulcair-s-polls-dilemma-canadians-like-him-but-will-they-vote-for-him-1.2780301

Brian Glennie

sherpa-finn wrote:

 

- Mulcair trying to define himself in the eyes and minds of Canadians: "No one ever gave me anything, unlike Justin;

 

 

Meanwhile, the President of the NDP is Rebecca Blaike...

 

sherpa-finn

I think a distinction can be usefully made between 'Political Families"  and "Dynasties", but point taken.

sherpa-finn

Sorry, Brachina - I think you are pulling a Calandra on me - answering a question that I did not ask, responding to a comment that I did not make.

I am happy to pursue the discussion about the the distinction between 'Political Families"  and "Political Dynasties", though it probably warrants a separate thread.

Off the top of my head, and thinking just of the NDP,  I can think of the Blaikies, the Notleys, the Shaw / McDonoughs. No doubt there are many more. The only prospective claim on dynasty status in teh NDP would likely be the Lewises, - though one can probably cut them some slack as David led federally and Stephen provincially.  So there was no father-to-son hand-over, per se. The fact that they overlapped as leaders in the early '70s must have animated discussions at the dinner table.

As far as real political dynasties go, I always had a soft spot for the Johnson family here in Quebec: father and two sons, - all of whom became premier of the province, - but representing three different parties.

Brachina

 

Rebecca Blaikie has worked hard for her position, it wasn't just handed to her on a silver platter like Justin Trudeau. Rebecca has worked her ass off in multiple roles within the NDP and comparing her to that silver spooned clown Trudeau is inexcusable offensive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brachina

 Sorry Finn, I didn't mean to qoute you, this was aimed at Brian.

sherpa-finn

The NDP's latest framing of the Trudeau Liberals: When it comes to presenting a different vision than Stephen Harper, the Liberals are an echo not a real voice. 

"An echo, not a real voice". As slogans go, I think that one has legs.

http://www.ndp.ca/news/liberals-keep-lining-conservatives

DaveW

anyone here going to Quebec City NDP event, weekend Oct. 24-26?

sherpa-finn

Here is the latest outreach / mobilization video from NDP HQ. Builds on Layton legacy of 2011, then transitions thru the Harper years to focus at the end on Mulcair as "I'm Ready!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCGwHoHyWo8&feature=youtu.be

Aristotleded24

sherpa-finn wrote:
Here is the latest outreach / mobilization video from NDP HQ. Builds on Layton legacy of 2011, then transitions thru the Harper years to focus at the end on Mulcair as "I'm Ready!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCGwHoHyWo8&feature=youtu.be

[url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7H1iqOraXv8]Notre histoire[/url]

sherpa-finn

For those Babblers on twitter, Lauren Dobson-Hughes (‏@ldobsonhughes)  today tweeted a summary analysis of how the Conservatives in the UK succsessfully won over working class support from Labour - which is now drifting even further to the right towards UKIP.  Its rooted in the assessment that a large portion of working class voters are very much 'small-c conservative' in nature - and that Margaret Thatcher was able to speak to their aspirations and identity and capture' a significant portion of their electoral support.

According to Dobson-Hughes, a key element of that political process was to successfully drive a wedge between working class identity and union loyalty.

While the analysis is rooted in the UK of the '80s and '90s, it has some interesting parallels (IMHO) with the prevailing Canadian context - if we can reasonably equate Canada's "Tim Hortons crowd" with UK's working class.  As per this thread: how should the NDP most effectively respond to the anticipated attacks on unions (most particularly public service unions) in the year ahead, as the Harper Gov't positions itself for the 2015 campaign?

FWIW, Dobson-Hughes is currently president of Planned Parenthood in Ottawa, and a forner NDP staffer on the Hill.

Aristotleded24

Aristotleded24 wrote:
sherpa-finn wrote:
Here is the latest outreach / mobilization video from NDP HQ. Builds on Layton legacy of 2011, then transitions thru the Harper years to focus at the end on Mulcair as "I'm Ready!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCGwHoHyWo8&feature=youtu.be

[url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7H1iqOraXv8]Notre histoire[/url]

What I like about these videos is it feels as if the viewer is being drawn into a marathon-relay race. We are in it for the long haul, and you can clearly see the baton being passed from Layton to Turmel to Mulcair, with Mulcair giving the ultimate push to go over the finish line.

sherpa-finn

And here is Mulcair in a somewhat different milieu .... he accounts himself reasonably well, I thought on issues of reproductive choice and of course the child care plan.

http://www.thesocial.ca/video?vid=467904

And if you enjoy that piece, - hang in for the following one on "How often do you say 'I love you' to your partner?' :)

Pages