Tar Sands Hell

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Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

quote:
Conservative Leader Ed Stelmach signalled Monday he'll ignore a call from some of Canada's largest energy companies to control expansion in the oilsands to protect fragile lands. He also brushed aside a plea from the province's aboriginal chiefs to halt approval of new projects.

I hope one of the environmental groups takes him to court to try and knock some sense into him.

Noise

quote:


I hope one of the environmental groups takes him to court to try and knock some sense into him.

I'm hoping the voters decide to do that this coming Monday.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

quote:


Originally posted by Noise:

I'm hoping the voters decide to do that this coming Monday.


I had forgotten about the election! It'd be great if the electorate decide they've had enough.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Clayton Thomas-Mьller of the Mathais Colomb Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba, the indigenous oil campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network, writes in [url=http://canadiandimension.com/articles/2008/03/04/1646/]Canadian Dimension:[/url]

A moratorium on further tar-sands expansion must be implemented in northern Alberta. Since the tar-sands expansion is within First Nations’ territories, any effective strategy must acknowledge Aboriginal title and treaty rights. This will require an urgent, coordinated, collective response, led by First Nations and Mйtis.

A moratorium on development is required until the concerns of First Nations and Mйtis regarding the many serious issues that have been raised by this breakneck industrial development are addressed. These include the human-rights abuses; the human and ecological health crisis; the climate-change implications; the water- and air-quality implications; the treaty-rights implications; the tribal sovereignty and self-determination implications; as well as the cumulative socioeconomic impacts on the health and way of life of indigenous peoples. Each of these serious issues must be responded to, respected and protected in a permanent, traditional, Indigenous framework, in compliance with the spiritual and natural laws, treaties and inherent rights of indigenous peoples.

Fleabitn

As long as the politicians, the MSM and the sheeple view the economy/environmental protection to be an either/or situation, the majority will always choose the economy, even if its proven to be unsustainable or even disastrous. Ignorance is bliss.

No politician seeking re-election will ever challenge the current economic model, for the corporatists are their bosses and their king-makers.

One trouble with the short-sighted sheeple is that they can't see the effects of disastrous climate change until its right on top of them, otherwise it is simply "weather" implying no control, and no anthropomorphic effect.

[ 11 March 2008: Message edited by: Fleabitn ]

martin dufresne

Nice quip from Gilles Duceppe in the House today, commenting on the government's new petroleum industry pollution 'controls': "Minister Baird is to the environment what the Governor of the State of New York is to morality."
Wish Jack had said that...

Doug

It's about the west coast as well - what if there's a major expansion of ports there to load Alberta oil onto supertankers?

quote:

Wildlife artist Robert Bateman didn't have to see an oil spill to know what one would look like along his beloved west coast.

In his mind, he can see birds soaking in oil spills. And the stark images of black tar-like liquid covering the coast are perfectly clear.

But Bateman, who lives on Saltspring Island on one of B.C.'s Gulf Islands and is perhaps the country's most well-known living wildlife artist, said he believes others need convincing about the need to keep oil tankers out of the area.


[url=http://www.thestar.com/News/Canada/article/349121]http://www.thestar.com...

[url=http://www.notankers.ca/]http://www.notankers.ca/[/url]

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

[url=http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=7938941961]Facebook: Stop the Tar Sands - Edmonton[/url]

[url=http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2375244025]Facebook: Stop The Tar Sands - end our addiction to oil[/url]

[url=http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=8273074356]Facebook: Ed Stelmach - Fossil Fool of the Year[/url]

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

quote:


Originally posted by M. Spector:
[url=http://tinyurl.com/3qddqf]Read more[/url]

Excellent link - thanks! This subject came up in Question Period today, I think it was raised by Layton, although my memory is hazy on this.

Yibpl
Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

[url=http://www.canada.com/calgaryherald/news/story.html?id=9f1a4588-2047-455... begins oil sands propaganda campaign[/url]

[b]excerpt:[/b]

Today the battle shifts to Washington, D.C., where deputy premier Ron Stevens begins a five-day mission to bolster the oilsands brand.

[b]excerpt:[/b]

The Alberta government is ramping up its effort, too. This week it was revealed the province will spend $25 million over three years on an advertising and marketing campaign to boost the Alberta "brand."

Stelmach vowed he won't let environmentalists hijack public perception of the province's oil.

The stakes for the province are high: $100 billion in national and international investment is flooding into the region, making it a strategic source of new global oil supply and a boon to the entire Canadian economy.

"That's why in the speech I talked about taking the message to other jurisdictions around the world, getting the message out," Stelmach said Thursday.

"I'm not going to leave it up to Greenpeace, Sierra Club or any of these other groups."

[b]excerpt and counterpoint:[/b]

Stelmach even referenced the contentious East Coast seal hunt.

Despite federal and provincial government efforts to characterize the seal hunt as responsible and humane, images of clubbed and skinned seals have struck a chord around the world. Animal rights activists now have the ear of the European Union, which is contemplating a crippling ban on Canadian seal products.

A similar threat may loom for

Alberta's oilsands as climate change concerns mount. For many environmentalists, the development's carbon footprint is too heavy, producing three times more greenhouse gases than a conventional barrel of oil.

"The tar sands are one of the world's largest environmental disasters and they are occurring right on this government's watch," Greenpeace's Mike Hudema yelled as two security guards escorted him out of the premier's dinner Thursday.

This sort of talk -- and the potential risk it carries -- has captured the attention of Canada's powerful oil lobby.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

[url=http://winnipegsun.com/News/Canada/2008/05/08/5512826.html]U.S. law could force Alberta to sell oilsands fuel to other nations:Stelmach [/url]

excerpt:

[b]If the United States follows through with import restrictions on “dirty” crude, Alberta will simply sell its massive oil reserves to other countries, says Premier Ed Stelmach. [/b]

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/canada/edmonton/story/2008/06/23/us-mayors-oilsands.ht.... mayors join call for ban on oilsands-based gasoline[/url]

excerpt:

U.S. mayors are adding their voices to those raising concerns about energy produced from Alberta's vast oilsands.

The U.S. Conference of Mayors, meeting in Miami this week, has approved a resolution calling on its members to ban the use of energy from unconventional sources because of its impact on the environment.

"We don't want to spend taxpayer dollars on fuels that make global warming worse," said Eugene, Ore., Mayor Kitty Piercy, who submitted the resolution.

"Tarsands oil emits up to three times the greenhouse gases in the production process per barrel as convention oil production. Our cities are asking for environmentally sustainable energy and not fuels from dirty sources such as tarsands."

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I just watched a feature on CNN, on finding new energy for the US. They focused on Alberta's oil sands, [i]with not one single word[/i] on how polluting this venture is. [img]mad.gif" border="0[/img]

They did mention it takes two tons of oil sands to make one barrel of oil, and that Alberta produces much more oil than Canada needs, so most of it is shipped to the US, and an estimate was given that there is a 70 to 150 year supply. That sounds optimistic, but who knows.

The person doing the reporting also mentioned there's a negotiation, backed by the Chinese, to build a pipeline to the west coast, that could be used to sell Alberta oil to China (probably has something to do with the protest against 'dirty oil' building in the US).

Finally, that reporter also said someone (I don't know who) is pushing Alberta to increase oil sands production from 1.5 million barrels a day to 4 million barrels a day. If that happens, polution will be doubtless increased. [img]frown.gif" border="0[/img]

[ 08 July 2008: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

The premiers of both Alberta and Saskatchewan were on CTV's Question Period today, and both said they will oppose Dion's carbon tax and continue with their own carbon capture and storage programs. Stelmach in particular wants Canadians to become better educated about Alberta, as he's tired of the ignorance about their pollution control measures. (don't shoot the messenger, I'm just reporting what I heard)

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Quote: "The suit [caution: 9 Megabyte, 704-page .pdf file!] pits the Beaver Lake Cree band against the governments of Canada and Alberta, asking the court to rule invalid the government authorization for thousands of petroleum projects on the band's core territory."

How the hell could governments give the okay for petroleum projects on First Nation property in the first place? I hope this lawsuit gets the support of all FN ppeople and organizations right across the country, and gets heavy coverage in mainstream media. It's outrageous that the tar sands projects went ahead without FN consultation.

It's Me D

That quote is hilarious! The carbon tax being proposed by "other parties" would not have accomplished what he says at all: its' revenue neutral = no revenue for infrastructure, and the article criticizes Harper's corporate tax cut without mentioning that those same "other parties" support that cut! Obviously the author knows there is a problem but they seem to have been fooled into thinking the Liberals have a solution!

Fidel

Somewhere around 30 countries have socialized medicine. Many have national day care. The Liberals talk about funding these very same things here in Canada. In fact, the Liberals talked us to death for twelve years.

George Victor

Latest CBC radio news from the tar sands is that the techies who are expected to find means of "burying" carbon emissions in old oil wells are quietly admitting that it's just too difficult to collect the emissions from the upgraders themselves.

Alberta has committed to spending $2 billion on emissiions capture and burial, but it would seem their best hope now is to go after the emissions at the stacks of the energy generating producers - coal in particular.  

At present, the oil patch  is producing five per cent of Canada's total carbon emissions.  Talk is of this being expected to rise to 15 per cent of Canada's total by 2020 - although I'm not sure if that was based on $100 + oil or allowed for the cutbacks in production expansion that are now underway.

And we can hope that the new U.S.administration, together with the consortium of "cleaner" states, will decline increased imports of oil from the tar sands early on. Although a Calgary Obama-watcher, Jane Cawthorne's letter to the editor observes that the president-elect has just chosen Lawrence Summers to be on his national economic council. He's the former "boys are best at math", Harvard president and one-time chief economist at the World Bank, whose infamopus 1991 memo read "just between you and me, shouldn't the World Bank be encouraging more migration of the dirty industries to the LCDs (less developed countries)?"

Anyway, the technological fix of carbon sequestration - first experimented with by the late NDP government of Saskatchewan along the Alberta border,  and held up by the incoming yahoos as a sign of their progressiveness - is less and less likely to mean diddly squat.

Ned Ludd had it right.

 

George Victor

The also kinda maybe good news is that the Energy Resources and Conservation Board, Alberta's energy (guffaw) regulator will require companies to "define how they will reduce their tailings production and set timelines for turning their tailings ponds into solid deposits."

The prostitutes are first "consulting the industry" over the new regulations. "When the rules are complete"( read, satisfactory to the polluters) "for the first time, Albertans will have certainty on how tailings from oil sands projects will be stored, converted and reclaimed," said the ERCBs chairman, Dan McFadyen.

And by golly, oil sands firms including Syncrude Canada, Suncor Energy Inc. and Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.  have said ther are "investigating new technology to dry out the tailings they create," according to the Globe and Mail story this morning.

"A lot of work is being done not just on current programs, but also to push the techology envelope further," said Syncrude spokesman Alain Moore.

---------------

You can tell by the determined if obtuse language  of government and industry that the ducks of Alberta - however many remain - might be safe ...by about 2050.

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

I mentioned the complicity of both the Conservative provincial and federal governments in perpetuating the Big Lie about carbon capture over here, yesterday. I also provided links to Stelmach lying his pasty old ass off about creating jobs in Ontario (rather than destroying the entire manufacturing sector here with his buddies Harper and Flaherty), and his mendacious claim that 13% of the Tar Sands have been rehabilitated - an impossibility, when only 0.2% had been certified as reclaimed as of May.

George Victor

And with the World Bank chief economist aboard the Obama train, what are chances of the U.S. rejecting oil from the sands I wonder?

(sorry I missed your earlier post on the carbon sequestation lie)

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Tar sands threaten millions of birds

 excerpt:

The development of the tar sands could lead to the loss of more than 160 million birds over the next 30 to 50 years because of the elimination of habitat and deaths from drowning in tailings ponds, according to a report being released today.

Wilder

Frustrated Mess wrote:

quote:


still disagree with that ... Most (not all) Albertans are generally unaware of the environmental disaster that is the oil sands


So when their grandchildren are killing each other over water and food they will say "I didn't know."

I've heard that before only it wasn't ecocide. It was a different cide.

I don't buy it. They know. How can they not? You can't have an economy founded on infinite consumption and the destrcution of the land base replete with the toxifying of air and water and not know.

 


 


I disagree that they understand what they are doing to their landbase. I have lived in Alberta, and just spent several months there. My family members make an excellent living off the oil sands. The environment is so far down the list of their priorities that it's shocking. They are only just starting to participate in recycling household garbage! There was a lot of excitement around the diningroom table when oil reached its peak price. We tried to talk to people about peak oil, and most had never heard of it, and those who had, weren't worried; after all, their money can get them out of any scrape.

The dominant discourse surrounding the oil patch and the environment is that they use "green technologies"; that people who raise environmental concerns are jealous of their money. There is very little critical discussion of the environment in Alberta (in fact, I find it astonishingly absent), and if there is discussion, it generally involves buying a hybrid SUV or using cloth shopping bags. If Albertans were to start questioning what they are doing to the land, they would have to face the prospect of being far less wealthy, and very few people are willing to do that.

I think a major factor in this blindness is that so many Albertans are not, in fact, from Alberta. I think they must be the most deracinated people in Canada. The strongest tie most of them have to the land is through the money they make from it.  Being wealthy has become part of the Albertan identity. Take the oil sands and they are just displaced suburbanites from Ontario. Perhaps the backup plan is just to go back home when its all over, although I really don't feel very many have a backup plan. 

Alberta, for me, represents some of the most horrifying aspects of what this world has come to.  

 

It's Me D

Wilder wrote:

I think a major factor in this blindness is that so many Albertans are not, in fact, from Alberta. I think they must be the most deracinated people in Canada. The strongest tie most of them have to the land is through the money they make from it. Being wealthy has become part of the Albertan identity. Take the oil sands and they are just displaced suburbanites from Ontario. Perhaps the backup plan is just to go back home when its all over, although I really don't feel very many have a backup plan.

I think this is quite a good point, everyone from out here in Atlantic Canada (that is those who I know personally) who has headed out to Alberta to work has done so purely for money. I haven't known any of them to actually express affection for Alberta (the land or its' people). They are there for the money, they suffer through living in the West, and then they return to Atlantic Canada to live off oil sands money with the people they do care about, on the land they do value. Although one must be very ignorant to suppose that what happens in Alberta stays in Alberta (environmentally speaking), many are able to put the long-term consequences aside to justify the short-term need for $$$ to provide for their families.

outwest

 

A few salient facts:

There are, or planned to be, 8 major pipelines from Alberta to the US and at least 1 to the West coast.

 

Monitoring, save for one UP RIVER station, is undertaken by the oil corporations themselves. So much for both federal and provincial environmental regulation. It's a farce.

 

The area planned for excavation is the size of Florida.

 

We have circa 14 -18 billion in our Heritage Trust Fund; Norway, an equivalent petro-state ,has close to 400 billion. Where has all our profit gone? From what I can see, to cronyism and industry ugly-as-hell skyscrapers and sports facilities and highways and ringroads all leading to the tar sands. God knows, we don't see it in our public transit, hospitals, reserves, schools, social housing, etc.

 

We live in a petro-state run behind the curtains by Americans. "We take your oil and ruin your land - You get fabulous-paying jobs, NO taxes, crime, lousy traffic, tent cities for your thousands of homeless, and sky's-the-limit housing prices. Now shut up and tell everyone how happy you are."

 

The ONLY thing that's going to change anything would be for a progressive federal government (as in current Germany), to pour mega money into alternative energy industries IN Alberta, creating 100,000 new jobs. If you think that will happen internally from within Alberta, it won't. Peak Oil is real and the Americans need every last drop so the system is too tied up with foreign investment. We're virtual prisoners held captive by a very ugly, corporate-run matrix. Even industry CEO's have said privately that what's going on is disgraceful.

 

In their rush to squeeze oil out of the tar sands, the oil corporations will destroy Alberta's water system. Irony is, it's that very lack of water that will stop them from getting it all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

outwest

 

To It's Me.

 

Yes. And if you think those of us with pioneer roots in Alberta appreciate the fact that workers who have no intention of staying here  are encouraged by corporate control and our traitorous government to come here, help rape the land at breakneck speed, and return to other lands they so deeply "care about," with no thought to the destruction they're participating in and what they're leaving behind - ie. "take the money and run," we don't.  There's no virtue there; it's all selfishness in everyone involved. What goes around, comes around and we're ALL affected.

 

But perhaps you'll find out what I'm talking about when the oil industry starts reving up in your neck of the woods.  Don't hold your breath, it's ugly, and you won't be able to do a damned thing about it because everyone, including some of your own, will sell out for the MONEY. You 're just lucky because you won't see the environmental damage as it's out under the ocean floor, that's all.

It's Me D

I'm not sure what comment you think your replying to outwest but trust me we are on the same side on this! Re-read my last comment and I think you'll find nothing in it to suggest I'm reveling in the destruction of Alberta or the wider environment. Here's a little repost to help:

"Although one must be very ignorant to suppose that what happens in
Alberta stays in Alberta (environmentally speaking), many are able to
put the long-term consequences aside to justify the short-term need for
$$$ to provide for their families."

Your posts have been good, spot on really, and I support them. Your last one (besides accidentally me Wink) missed one thing though: workers from Atlantic Canada do not want to be travelling out to rape Alberta's land for $$$, they are forced to do so because industry and their patsies in successive federal and provincial governments have sold-out the economy of the Atlantic provinces to the point where, like the unfortunate latinos, we must leave our beloved homelands to find work elsewhere, or our families will not eat. I certainly didn't mean to imply that we Atlantic Canadians are happy with the predicament that forces us to Alberta, though I'm not sure how you got that impression.

outwest

 

 

To It's Me D:


Thanks for that clarification!

I'm sorry, I read your post in a bit of a hurry and mistook your one line to mean that those Eastern workers were "smart enough to know how to value their own land, as Albertans clearly don't." I enjoy your writing very much, as well. It's critical that we don't get torn from sea to sea, blaming each area of Canada for what's happening environmentally, when it's clear that progressives from every single area are heartsick to see the destruction global corporatization is wreaking both socially and environmentally in all countries and lands.

 

By the way, I don't know how to start a new thread, but I wanted to comment on Laxer's article - great insight."

Wilder

The Alberta government is trying to figure out a way to deny funding to films that portray Alberta in a bad light after the Alberta Film Development Fund funded a documentary about the Fort Chipewyan cancer cluster.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/calgary/story/2008/12/11/alberta-film.html

 

Noah_Scape

Outwest, I actually DID leave Alberta due to the outrage over the
environment/corporate control that I was feeling, and the changing
quality of the air there.

This is a terrific thread... I summarized some of the main jabs at the Tar Sands Hell:

There is the natural gas waste -


There is the water usage - Quote: "119.5 billion gallons of water
for tar sands extraction est. 82% from the Athabasca River. Of that,
extraction companies were only required to return 10 billion gallons to
the river"

There is the local population's health - "Fort Chipewyan cancer cluster."

There is the boreal forest lain to waste, and the tailing ponds issue too {"Planned area the size of Florida"}

Tar sands threaten millions of birds:
Quote: "The development of the tar sands could lead to the loss
of more than 160 million birds over the next 30 to 50 years because of
the elimination of habitat and deaths from drowning in tailings ponds,
according to a report being released today. "

Lack of financial benefit to Albertans or Canada:
Quote "We have circa 14 -18 billion in our Heritage Trust Fund;
Norway, an equivalent petro-state, has close to 400 billion"

 

I
would just add that Norway nationalised it's oil industry, as have a
few other nations, and they have done wonderfull things for the general
population. I am stunned at how many votes the Tories get in
Alberta.... [sheeple!!].

Also, about the pipeline
from Alaska: energy industry humps say that they need some new supply
to keep the pipelines filled up because supply we have now is running
low. So, just stop wasting it all on the tar sands!

 Finally, about natural gas use, from what I heard: 1/3rd of Alberta's
natural gas production goes to the Tar Sands; no royalties need to be
paid on nat.gas that is used at the tar sands.

George Victor

Now the producers want to "treat" the toxic waste water and dump it into the Athabasca. They had planned to store it for "decades" but the chemicals aren't settling out in those waste-water lakes (now covering an area the size of Saskatoon) as their engineers had predicted. And there is leakage.

Canada has been ranked second-worst in carbon emission reduction and planning failure (next to Saudi Arabia) by the world scientific community that met in Poland this month. That's a finding based  80 per cent on emission measurements and 20 per cent descernible progress in planning for reductions in future.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

[url=Tar">http://westcoastclimateequity.org/?p=2486][u]Tar Sands Facts[/url]

Yibpl

George Victor wrote:

Now the producers want to "treat" the toxic waste water and dump it into the Athabasca. They had planned to store it for "decades" but the chemicals aren't settling out in those waste-water lakes (now covering an area the size of Saskatoon) as their engineers had predicted. And there is leakage.
...

This month’s National Geographic has several photos of the Oil Sands industry.  I was shocked at how close to the Athabasca River some of the settling-ponds are.  Even as a layperson,  it strikes me as being a very obviously remarkably bad idea to have a toxic waste settling-pond within a few meters of a river!

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Yibpl wrote:

This month’s National Geographic has several photos of the Oil Sands industry.  I was shocked at how close to the Athabasca River some of the settling-ponds are.  Even as a layperson,  it strikes me as being a very obviously remarkably bad idea to have a toxic waste settling-pond within a few meters of a river!

Why can't Liberal Messiah Iggy, who dismissed the National Geographic story completely, see this as well?Frown

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Subject: Fri/Ven 20 Mar: Tar Sands: Stopping the flow of destruction from the ATHABASCA to the SAINT LAWRENCE

WHO: Mike Mercredi of Fort Chipewyan, tar sands organizers & researchers

WHEN: Friday March 20, 7pm WHERE: Room 26, Stephen Leacock Bldg (855 Sherbrooke Ouest)

FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=56282254164

WHY: With planned pipelines poised to bring over 200,000 barrels per day of tar sands oil into or through Montreal for refining, Alberta-based organizers are bringing news of the destruction wreaked by tar sands activities to Montreal and other communities in the path of the pipeline.

Mike Mercredi, a member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation and former tar sands worker, will discuss "life and death at ground zero".

The Cree and Dene community of Fort Chipewyan, Alberta lies directly downstream from the vast strip mining, extraction and tar sands processing operations around Fort McMurray, and is suffering the deadly impacts of the toxic extraction process. Mercredi will speak about his experiences working in the tar sands, his reasons for resigning from his job and the continued spread of rare diseases such as cancers, heart problems and lupus that the community has seen in vastly growing numbers (including members of his direct family). Along with environmental justice organizers Clayton Thomas-Muller (Indigenous Environmental Network) and Macdonald Stainsby (OilSandsTruth.org) Mercredi is visiting eastern communities to discuss coordinated cross-continent resistance to the tar sands and the vast destruction it entails.

Montreal-based journalist and writer Maya Rolbin-Ghanie will discuss the Enbridge "Trailbreaker" pipeline project, and the plan to expand Montreal refineries to process so-called "heavy oil" from the tar sands. Clayton Thomas-Muller, Canadian Indigenous Tar Sands Organizer, will discuss grassroots base building and Environmental Justice strategy and tactics. He will share how the Indigenous Environmental Network supports First Nations to speak for themselves on critical environmental and economic justice issues related to fighting the Tar Sands development in Northern Alberta, Canada.

Macdonald Stainsby will speak about the broader impacts of the tar sands gigaproject, including coast-to-coast-to-coast pipelines, refinery expansions throughout North America/Turtle Island. He will also discuss the significance of the recent economic crisis to the development of the tar sands and its impact on tar sands resistance.

[Presenters will speak in English. Whisper translation will be provided, and audience members are encouraged to ask questions in French.] * * * Organized by: RECLAIM ([email protected]) Co-sponsors: CKUT Radio, QPIRG McGill, QPIRG Concordia, Sierra Youth Coalition, The Dominion * * * A map showing the location of the Leacock building: http://www.mcgill.ca/maps/?Building=150

A brief Edmonton Sun article about Mike Mercredi: http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2008/11/24/7513861-sun.html

Listen to audio of Mike Mercredi: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/audio/mike_mercredi

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Yibpl wrote:

This month’s National Geographic has several photos of the Oil Sands industry.

The article, but not all the photos, is [url=available">http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/03/canadian-oil-sands/kunzig-text... online[/url]. An excerpt:

Quote:
A poll conducted by the Pembina Institute in 2007 found that 71 percent of Albertans favored an idea their government has always rejected out of hand: a moratorium on new oil sands projects until environmental concerns can be resolved. "It's my belief that when government attempts to manipulate the free market, bad things happen," Premier Stelmach told a gathering of oil industry executives that year. "The free-market system will solve this."

But the free market does not consider the effects of the mines on the river or the forest, or on the people who live there, unless it is forced to. Nor, left to itself, will it consider the effects of the oil sands on climate. Jim Boucher has collaborated with the oil sands industry in order to build a new economy for his people, to replace the one they lost, to provide a new future for kids who no longer hunt ptarmigan in the moonlight. But he is aware of the trade-offs. "It's a struggle to balance the needs of today and tomorrow when you look at the environment we're going to live in," he says. In northern Alberta the question of how to strike that balance has been left to the free market, and its answer has been to forget about tomorrow. Tomorrow is not its job.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

posted above:

Boom Boom wrote:

Subject: Fri/Ven 20 Mar: Tar Sands: Stopping the flow of destruction from the ATHABASCA to the SAINT LAWRENCE

excerpt:

Montreal-based journalist and writer Maya Rolbin-Ghanie will discuss the Enbridge "Trailbreaker" pipeline project, and the plan to expand Montreal refineries to process so-called "heavy oil" from the tar sands.

excerpt:

Macdonald Stainsby will speak about the broader impacts of the tar sands gigaproject, including coast-to-coast-to-coast pipelines, refinery expansions throughout North America/Turtle Island. He will also discuss the significance of the recent economic crisis to the development of the tar sands and its impact on tar sands resistance.

 

Tar Sands oil to be processed in Montreal? Holy smokes!Surprised

Noise

Boom Boom...  Here is a [url=http://rabble.ca/babble/environmental-justice/alberta-orders-oil-sands-f... Previous Thread[/url] where the Trailbreaker project was discussed...  ClaudeB's post #10 in particular really highlighted this projects goals.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Thanks, I had forgotten about that thread, too many things going on here for me to keep track of who said what. Embarassed

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

The book I quoted from at #72 above is now available for download in .pdf format [url=FREE">http://www.dmpibooks.com/pdf/tar-sands][u]FREE OF CHARGE[/url] until Friday.

Don't miss this opportunity to get this valuable book! It belongs in your library.

Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent, by Andrew Nikiforuk

mybabble

Thats kinda like Harper and the Campbell combo you gotta know these quys are up to something and its not in your best interests like TILMA.  As 60 Billion Tax Break is more than a payoff it an insult to hard working Canadians who get fleeced at the pumps?  Baa Baa three bags full one for the bankers, one for the CEO's of coporations, and one for the politicians.  Leaving none for the hardworking public who is now in a deficit and holding a empty shopping bag.

Its like it but its far worst as the consequences of letting a major Oil Company like Suncor have free range to dig for black oil without government interference casts a sense of doom over the environment.

mybabble

Sorry posted Black Hell and didn't see this post as Suncor and Petro Canada unite to create the biggest blackest hell hole on earth.  They need to be stopped as the consequences will be disatorous as we are all more than aware.  But they seem unstoppable in their pursuit to take everything that this country stands for and what it means to Canadians and flush it down some black hole they call Oil Sands.  ILLMUD

quantum

This project seems like an environmental disaster. I don't even think we really "need" that oil anyway.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Quote:
For each barrel of oil produced from the tar sands, between two and 4.5 barrels of water is needed. The water is used in the process of extracting bitumen from the naturally occurring the tar sand. The bitumen is later "upgraded" into synthetic crude oil.

In 2007, the government of Alberta approved the withdrawal of 119.5 billion gallons of water for tar sands extraction, of which an estimated 82 per cent came from the Athabasca River. Of that, extraction companies were only required to return 10 billion gallons to the river.

Most of the water used ends up in giant, toxic tailing ponds. As of 2006, tailing ponds covered 50 square kilometers of former boreal forest. By 2010, according to the Oil Sands Tailings Research Facility, the industry will have generated 8 billion tons of waste sand and 1 billion cubic metres of waste water - enough to fill 400,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools. Today, the largest human-made dam by volume of materials is the Syncrude tailing pond, a few kilometres from the Athabasca river.

[url=http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/1480]What the Tar Sands Need[/url]

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

[url=http://www.canada.com/calgaryherald/story.html?id=96b72fda-3685-445d-a71... Poll Says Canadians Want Oil Sands Capped[/url]

Quote:
Roughly half of Canadians -- and nearly the same proportion of Albertans -- believe new oilsands projects should be suspended until environmental issues in northern Alberta are resolved, a new poll suggests.

The survey also shows four of five Canadians disagree with the Harper government's approach to protect economic growth in the oilsands sector while allowing its annual greenhouse gas emissions to triple over the next decade.

Matt Price, a climate and energy policy expert with Environmental Defence, which commissioned the survey, said the poll indicates Canadians won't accept a government approach that goes easy on the oilsands sector.

“In general, the public seems to be ahead of politicians in wanting to attack global warming," Price said.

The survey, conducted by McAllister Opinion Research, shows 79 per cent of Canadians said greenhouse gas emissions from the oilsands sector should be "capped at current levels and then reduced" because of the impact on global warming. Only 12 per cent of respondents, both in the province and in the country as a whole, said emissions from the oilsands sector should be "allowed to exceed current levels" so as to encourage economic growth.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Quote:
The federal government has confirmed that it will spend $1.5 billion dollars in additional subsidies to tar sands companies as a result of its slow phase out of tax breaks for one of Canada's largest greenhouse gas emitting (GHG) industries. And [url=http://www.kairoscanada.org/e/ecology/PumpedUpInsides080415.pdf]Pumped Up, a new KAIROS study,[/url] (3 MB .pdf file) concludes that by 2012 GHG emissions from the tar sands alone may wipe out all anticipated reductions in GHG emissions from all federal government programs.

The government confirmed the tax break figures in its responses to a formal petition filed with the Auditor General of Canada by KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives, a church-based social justice organization. KAIROS' analysis of likely GHG emission reductions is based on the federal government's own figures.

The petition was filed last November and the government was legally required to respond within 120 days. While the government provided answers to some questions, it failed to respond to the key question at the heart of the petition.

"Why does Canada spend millions of dollars on subsidizing oil and gas industries - a prime cause of climate change - and so little money on green alternatives when the majority of Canadians want action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? That was the essential question we asked the government," says John Dillon, a KAIROS Program Coordinator and co-author of Pumped Up: How Canada subsidizes fossil fuels at the expense of green alternatives. "The government didn't answer that core question."

[url=http://tinyurl.com/3qddqf]Read more[/url]

What's with these websites that have ridiculously long computer generated URLs? Are they trying to make it hard to link to them? That's ten minutes of my life I'd like to have back again.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

[url=http://www.commondreams.org/archive/2008/07/25/10589/]Eleven Greenpeace Activists Arrested Protesting the Tar Sands Hell[/url]

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With today’s demonstration, the Greenpeacers targeted the same sludgy six-square-kilometer tailings pond where 500 ducks drowned in April, despite environmental regulations that require Syncrude to have wildlife deterrents in place.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

[url=http://thetyee.ca/News/2008/07/28/LawSuit/]Aboriginal lawsuit could shut down Tar Sands[/url]

Quote:
Jack Woodward and the Beaver Lake Cree aim to change Canadian law -- and their success likely would throw a huge wrench into Alberta's tar-sands oil production.

The [url=http://www.beaverlakecreenation.ca/upload/documents/statementofclaim.pdf... [caution: 9 Megabyte, 704-page .pdf file!][/url] pits the Beaver Lake Cree band against the governments of Canada and Alberta, asking the court to rule invalid the government authorization for thousands of petroleum projects on the band's core territory.

Woodward, a Victoria-based Aboriginal-law expert, filed the suit on behalf of his clients this May, and says its intent is to lay the groundwork for a new legal regime governing resource extraction on land reserved for or claimed by Canada's First Nations.

- from The Tyee

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Quote:
The uncomfortable truth remains simply this: the rapid mining of the boreal forest has outpaced the science on the reclamation of wetlands, soil, and forest uplands by decades. No one has a handle on the real costs of reclamation. Security deposits remain laughably inadequate. And both Alberta and Canada have an appalling record of environmental negligence and disregard for taxpayers.

Reclamation in the tar sands now amounts to little more than putting lipstick on a corpse. Unless Alberta and Canada soon address the pace, effectiveness and transparency of reclamation, a rich forest will become an impoverished industrial park littered with salts, grass, polluted water and spindly trees. It might, with a bit of luck and some regular rainfall, eventually resemble a third-rate golf course in the Sudan.

From Andrew Nikiforuk's forthcoming book, Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent, to be published October 15 by Greystone Books / Douglas & McIntyre. [url=http://www.zcommunications.org/znet/viewArticle/18878]Source[/url]

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