Weather thread

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jas

Winnipeg must have been the warmest in the country today. My temp gauge on my bike touched 20C briefly today. It was 15C at 9pm tonight. Not bad for November. May be the last day of riding tomorrow, though.

George Victor

quote:


Winnipeg must have been the warmest in the country today. My temp gauge on my bike touched 20C briefly today. It was 15C at 9pm tonight. Not bad for November. May be the last day of riding tomorrow, though.


And your weather has come to us here in old Ontariario. Used to call in "Indian summer", but in these days of record temperatures, climate change and political consciousness, we are afraid to give it a name.

Tommy_Paine

I was looking for this thread last week and couldn't find it.

Last week we had our first snow fall here in London. A disaster, really. It started out wet and ready to melt, but during the wee hours of the night, the temperature dropped, the wet snow froze, and the result was something like a good ice storm. Lots of tree branches down all over.

However, most of the damaged trees were Norway Maples, which have yet to drop their leaves. The snow froze to the leaves, and broke the branches.

London has a history of doing a lot of tree planting over the years, however, it's always done in a monoculture kind of way. Street after street of Norway Maple, or mountain ash. Bad urban forestry.

Anywho, since Friday last, it's been unseasonably warm, particularly today.

First time I've seen a significant snow fall here arrive before the junco's.

Tommy_Paine

I was looking for this thread last week and couldn't find it.

Last week we had our first snow fall here in London. A disaster, really. It started out wet and ready to melt, but during the wee hours of the night, the temperature dropped, the wet snow froze, and the result was something like a good ice storm. Lots of tree branches down all over.

However, most of the damaged trees were Norway Maples, which have yet to drop their leaves. The snow froze to the leaves, and broke the branches.

And, it's the first time I've seen a significant snow fall arrive before the juncos.

London has a history of doing a lot of tree planting over the years, however, it's always done in a monoculture kind of way. Street after street of Norway Maple, or mountain ash. Bad urban forestry.

Anywho, since Friday last, it's been unseasonably warm, particularly today. I think last week's snow was some freakish lake effect thing.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Awful weekend for weather here - heavy rain, strong wind, and snow in the mix later in the week. I got an email from our priest this morning indicating the evening service tonight is cancelled due to the weather - our congregation is mostly seniors, and she didn't want to put them through very nasty weather just to attend church. Hmmm... that didn't come out right.Sealed

George Victor

 

The Anglican church never did pretend to be able to control the weather - but I've always been impressed by its concern for parishioners. 

The widow of a priest who once served the North Shore just east of you, and out on the tip of the Gaspe (she's 94) is resident in a local "home" here and a particular confidant of mine.  The average parishioner has changed somewhat from the period of the late 40s, I'm led to understand. A bit wussy now when it comes to weather.Smile

Geraldine will be  very interested to know that a gal can now handle the show up that way, post dogteam days. What is the name of the diocese, Mr. B, and what are its boudaries, please?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

This is the Diocese of Quebec, and our current priest is a woman who has lived here all her life, and was ordained just about five years ago, after having run one of the local stores with her husband. We`ve had clergy from the outside almost exclusively - a woman in Mutton Bay to the east of us by about 300 kilometers was also ordained, but she left for Ottawa shortly after she was ordained. You can see the boundaries at: http://www.quebec.anglican.org/Front%20page/the%20diocese/diocese%20ofquebec.htm

Our new bishop is a former NDP guy - Dennis Drainville, who was in Bob Rae`s government, but left to become an Independent, I think. Others may be able to elaborate on this.

George Victor

 

Thanks for the linkages, Mr. B. I've printed up the North Shore and Gaspe Deaneries (this pagan had forgotten the diocesan/deanery distinction) and Geraldine will be delighted. She puts up with my secular meanderings (a tolerance which I have come to associate with the Anglican faith and which seems to be celebrated in the literature of England, these days, as a strength of the church's past).

The old girl is the only one who subscribes to The Globe and Mail in an institution of 124 people, their final home.  Recollections of rural Quebec just after The War are a favourite topic. She'll enjoy what I've printed up.

Thanks again. Stay warm.Smile

George Victor

 

Wikipedia tells all...your "former NDP guy" has also spent time in jail, although for the best of reasons:

Dennis Paul Drainville (born February 20, 1954 in Joliette, Quebec) is a Canadian bishop and politician. He was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1990 to 1993, and later taught Humanities and History for 12 years at the Cegep College de la Gaspésie et des Îles.

Drainville was educated at the University of Toronto's Trinity College, and became an Anglican priest after his graduation. He worked as a parish priest in Ontario from 1982 to 1984, and was the executive director of STOP 103, a multi-service agency in Toronto where he raised the profile of poverty issues and entered into public debate on social policy with both the Federal Conservative Government and several Provincial Governments from 1984 to 1986. He Chaired the first National Conference on Hunger in Canada in 1987. He has served as a priest in the Anglican dioceses of Ontario, Montreal, Toronto and Quebec.

He first ran for the Ontario legislature in the 1977 provincial election. Drainville was a member of the Liberal Party at the time, and campaigned in the downtown Toronto riding of Riverdale. He finished a distant third against the winner, Jim Renwick of the New Democratic Party.

Drainville himself later joined the NDP, and in 1989 was arrested for protesting the province's clearcutting practices in the Northern Ontario forests around Temagami. He also stood with Chief Gary Potts and the Teme-Augami-Anishinabai people in their 60 year legal battle to claim their lands in Temagami. He was fined and sent to jail in North Bay for a week in March 1991. Drainville was NDP candidate in the riding of Victoria—Haliburton in the 1990 provincial election. This east-central Ontario seat was not regarded as winnable – indeed, no NDP candidate in the riding had ever finished higher than third place, behind the Liberals and Progressive Conservatives. However, the NDP under Bob Rae won an unexpected majority government in the election, and Drainville won the riding by 6,520 votes over his nearest opponent.

Drainville served as a parliamentary assistant from 1990 to 1992, and as a Deputy Speaker from 1992 to 1993. Drainville's most high profile role in the NDP Government was as Chair of the Select Committee on Ontario in Confederation. He oversaw a massive constitutional consultation process during the Charlottetown Accord negotiations. Eventually his loyalty to the Rae government became increasingly tenuous. Drainville emerged as an ally of Peter Kormos in the NDP caucus, and frequently opposed the policies of the Rae government from a left-wing perspective. On April 28, 1993, he resigned from NDP caucus to protest the Rae government's decision to bring casinos into the province. He continued to sit in the legislature as an independent. Later in the year, he voted against the Rae government's Social Contract legislation.

Drainville resigned from the legislature on September 27, 1993, and declared himself an independent candidate in the 1993 federal election. He finished a distant fourth against Liberal John O'Reilly in the federal Victoria—Haliburton riding, though he did outpoll the official NDP candidate by over a thousand votes.

Drainville later realigned himself with the federal NDP, and worked within the Quebec wing. He ran as an official NDP candidate in the 1997 election in the Quebec riding of Bonaventure—Gaspé—Îles-de-la-Madeleine—Pabok, but again finished a distant fourth with only 649 votes. It may be noted that the NDP has long been relatively weak in Quebec, particularly since the emergence of the Bloc Québécois, and such a finish was not uncommon.

Drainville was elected to the City Council of the Ville de Percé for two four year terms representing sector 7 of that municipality from 1994-2002. He also served as President of Seacoast Publications which publishes the only English Newspaper East of Quebec City from 1994 to 1995. In 2004 he founded and is a Trustee of the Gaspé Ecumenical Chaplaincy Foundation established to respond to the social health and spiritual needs of seniors on the Gaspé coast.

Drainville was elected to the Council of the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in 2004, at a meeting in St. Catharines, Ontario. At the same meeting, he seconded a successful motion for the Anglican Church in Canada to "affirm the sanctity and integrity of adult same-sex relationships". In 2006 he was appointed by the Council of General Synod to The Canadian Council of Churches as one of their representatives.

On October 12, 2007, while he was serving as Archbishop's Missioner in the Diocese of Quebec, Drainville was elected Coadjutor Bishop of the Diocese at a special Electoral Synod. He was ordained to the episcopate on January 18, 2008. [1] He will become diocesan bishop when the current Diocesan, Archbishop Bruce Stavert, retires in 2009.

 

This bio reaffirms my faith ... in some Anglicans, and Geraldine will have news for her dining group for the week.

  

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

The wind here is insane - it's been blowing all weekend without stopping, currently gusts of up to 70 km/h.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

George - thanks for the bio on Dennis; I knew some things about him (we went to college together) but not everything.

We got smacked by snow last night, I had to get my skidoo out this morning to shop for groceries, the snow is too slippery for my 2wd truck, although my neighbour did okay with his Ford minivan. I'm not a good winter driver, which is why I'm happy to live in a community where we all drive skidoos  for five+ months of the year.

Our forecast

 

George Victor

Sounds like a fun place in the winter, Mr. B.

And with Dennis's "connections", maybe you can have something done about an earlier and warmer spring?Smile 

 

ElizaQ ElizaQ's picture

  Oh look it's snowing again....

   Yay!

 

Sharon

Where are you, ElizaQ?  I forget -- and I miss the location lines.  In Halifax, we had about 20 cm. overnight.  The sun was shining brightly when I got up -- but since then, clouds have moved in and there has been a steady flurry for the last hour or so. 

The snow has brought the birds in great numbers to the feeder and to the few grapes that are left, including some lovely little yellow birds that we haven't had before.

remind remind's picture

Glad to see you were not caught out on the hwy with others in NS Sharon, when I saw that on the news I immediately thought of  you, and a friend  who is living there, from here, taking her Masters in Women's studies. 

We are right now getting our second snowfall of the year, first one came a couple of days before Halloween, but melted within hours. Extremely strange  late snowfall for the valley floor of the Rockies too.  Even more strange is that the ground is not frozen yet and neither are the lakes and streams. Last year, and most years, at this time we had been out shovelling at least a couple of times.

Our cats are quite upset of course as they had been enjoying the late snowfall almost as much as we have. They yelled to go out, and went running past me to get out, only to turn around and run back quicker than they had dashed out. Of course they believe somehow it is my fault as I got quite the nasty looks.

___________________________________________________________
"watching the tide roll away"

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

-16C here right now; I'm glad I spent yesterday cleaning the (wood burning) furnace and chimney so I could comfortably get a good fire going last night and today.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

For about the past six weeks we've had alternating moderately warm followed by very cold weather, and it's really f*cking up my attic over the side addition to this house - had a lot of water dripping through last night because of condensation - even with a new large roof vent. So, this morning, I had the local contractor go up and have a look, and he discovered that the inside insulation at the far lower end of the roof near the door entrance was all jammed up - right from the ceiling to the roof - preventing air circulation. So we pulled out all that jammed-up insulation, re-sealed the plastic vapour barrier, and are waiting for the next alternating warm/cold spell to see if condensation will continue to be a problem. He thinks I may have to add another vent to the roof, but that can wait until next year. Anyone else having a problem with attic condensation? How do you solve your problem? (this addition to the house was built by a prior occupant, not a certified carpenter, so I'm cleaning up his mistakes)

George Victor

Hi Mr. B.  This former house doctor just composed a series  of questions and tried to post it, but the goddam weird wired world product said I was not connected to the internet (a lie, I checked) and swallowed it all.

I'll try again, and post every couple of sentences and thus foil the digital monster in the machine.

George Victor

Question: What is the square footage of the addition, Mr. B. And is there a "shed" roof above it, attached to the main roof? Was there not a peaked roof added above the trailer?

How did the guy enter the addition attic...through the roof vent? There must be a fair amount of room in that attic to allow movement of a person down as far as the sill at the roof/ceiling junction? Did he find the underside of the roof dripping wet or just damp?

Does the roof collect snow and turn it to ice at the overhang? Or is the roof kept bare by heat lost into the attic?

The main thing is the vapour barrier, its placement and integrity.

It is down against the warm ceiling and the insulation (question how much and what type) lies above it?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

The contractor simply pulled down the ceiling tile and poked his head inside, and saw what the problem is - a whole bunch of insulation piled up at the lower end of the ceiling just above the doorframe. That in his opinion was preventing the air from circulating completely - he removed the offending insulation and voila! the air was moving again.

 The roofing material is metal sheeting, and has a new tower vent. The vaour barrier is sheet plastic. The roof itself doesn't have much of an angle. When we looked at the underside of the roof this morning it was dry. I'm leaving the ceiling tile off for a few days while waiting to see if any moisture continues to drip through - although now with better air circulation that might not occur. 

George Victor

 But the moisture got in there somehow, Mr. B.

The main thing is the vapour barrier, its placement and integrity. 

Is it down against the warm ceiling?  And how many inches of insulation (and what type) lies above  the vapour barrier?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Yes, the vapour barrier (plastic sheeting) is right against the ceiling tile on the inside of the room. There's nothing against the inside of the roof at all - just dry plywood. The insulation is about six inches of that red batting material, don't know the exact name of it, and that lies on top of the plastic sheeting.

George Victor

Right.

The increased ventilation flow could be enough to do the job for you.

But close up the tile. The moist air from inside your house is going up there with the heat, and when the weather gets cold enough again, it will be noticed.

If you don't have any leakage into the attic along the joint between trailer and addition, or around a stack penetrating the ceiling, then the source of the moisture remains a mystery. Good luck.

(Bring the insulation to more than 1 foot depth when you get a chance next summer, however - and the same for the main attic - and save some wood.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

It's going to be a tough winter here - already a lot of snow on the ground with more expected this week, and it's only the tenth of December, with 3 1/2 months of winter to go. Walking is fairly difficult now as our roads are not cleared of snow.Frown

Caissa

This week we have been alternating snow, rain and freezing rain. Temperatures have already fluctuated from minus 12 to plus 12. The rest of the week is forecast to follow this pattern.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Brutal weather here. Heavy rain last night, 100 km/h wind this morning, then everything is expected to freeze beginning this afternoon. It just be time for me to consider a move, although if I can get the building inspector to approve some home structural improvements under the provincial housing assistance program, I might re-consider.  

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

It's been very cold here.  We're just off a windchill warning for the last two days (-45 with w/c!), but it's still -25 this morning.  Too cold to run the dogs, but the ice rink in the back yard is coming along nicely.

Tommy_Paine

Yeah, that rain and temperature drop moved through here yesterday, Boom Boom.  Not terribly catastrophic here though.  The cold front came through dry.  The warm shrunk the snow banks, which is good because at the current rate there was danger of running out of places to put the snow later in the season. 

Looks like most of us in the south dodged a bullet with that storm that swept through the midwest and American north east.   Seems the edge of it hit lake Erie, and stopped it's northward progression there, and moved east.

The cold out west is supposed to make it's way here, probably as an "Alberta clipper".  Although, the temperatures will moderate quite a bit.  Might get lake effect snow though.  We'll see.

I welcome it, actually.  The sooner Lake Huron freezes over, the less snow we'll get. 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

I wouldn't mind a little more snow.  It doesn't snow when it gets this cold.  All the moisture's frozen out of the air already.  The wind sucks the moisture out of your skin the second you put your nose out the door.

Tommy_Paine

"Talk of your cold! through the parka's fold, it stabbed like a driven nail,"

We get treated to that from time to time.  But mostly it's freeze/thaw through most of the winter in the southern great lakes region.  I find it a pain in the ass.   Here, it's not snow that's the real problem, but ice.

 

 

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I'm grateful that even though we're quite an isolated community of just 100 persons, we nevertheless have a local contractor with lots of heavy equipment - he sprinkled sand on the icy roads here which makes it at least possible to move around a bit. Without the sand (and salt) it'd be suicide to attempt to go anywhere today. The community is one big skating rink right now, except for the roads that have been sanded.

Caissa

Rain last night with gusts to 90 km/h. 15 cm of snow forecast for tomorrow. I presume the schools will be closed. Of course, the University will be open.

Hoodeet

Hoodeet (JW)

It would be really helpful to know from which
part of the country each of you is writing.  (I'm on the east
coast, where some local fishermen have found the odd tropical fish near
our shores lately. Or perhaps it's a maritime urban legend.)

Tommy_Paine

Environment Canada is warning of a pair of storms due to hit South Western Ontario starting Friday and ending Sunday sometime. 

They say in that time we could see 50cm of snow.  And freezing rain might be in the mix on Sunday-- a pretty safe bet when we get an east wind here.

Yee Haw.

 

Bookish Agrarian

Tommy_Paine wrote:

"Talk of your cold! through the parka's fold, it stabbed like a driven nail,"

We get treated to that from time to time.  But mostly it's freeze/thaw through most of the winter in the southern great lakes region.  I find it a pain in the ass.   Here, it's not snow that's the real problem, but ice.

 

 

 

Here the problem is mud.  The snow came so quick and so deep that the ground never froze.  We have had so much rain since spring there was just no where for it to go so the ground was saturated.  Deep ruts everywhere and trying to clean it up is useless as it just runs away.

In our barn yard I even just dumped large round straw bales around to try and soak it up.  First time I have ever had to do that.  Thankfully their housing remains dry.  In fact it was so wet here we had planned on doing some construction work in and around the barn, but we were never able to do it because there was a large clay mud hole right in the middle of where we had to go to do the work.

 

Even the rain of Sunday night, Monday morning didn't bare enough ground for it to freeze.  This is going to be a miserable effin winter I think.  Thankfully I did get the snow blower on the tractor for this storm if it comes.

Tommy_Paine

I always hate that first good snowfall you have to shovel, because even if it's nice and fluffy on top, you know the ground has warmed the bottom cm or so into slush.  Makes for miserable shoveling.

Funny, though, the ground here is nicely frozen-- cement like.   My driveway and my nieghbour's run beside each other.  About a month ago, they had to remove and replace their sewer pipe for the length of their house.  The ground here is beach consistency sand to a depth of five feet, then yellow sticky clay-- a different clay than you'll find anywhere else around here except between the forks of the Thames.  It's like glue.

So, I've had this glue on my gravel driveway for a month.  It's fine while it's frozen, but a ghastly mess when thawed.  My neighbour was going to get some rock dust brought in to cover it until the spring, but the snow came unexpectedly early.  

So, I'm hoping that it stays cold. 

Have you noticed that the meteorological alerts have been getting, well, a tad mellodramatic in the last while?  Seems to me someone at Environment Canada has taken a creative writting course at a community college or something.  Last storm, the phrase "more than a dollop of snow" was used, along with some other stirring adjectives that escape me now.

Dollop? 

 

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I just hope there's no rain for the rest of the winter. This community is a giant skating rink this week because we had a day of heavy rain this week followed by -20C temps. And a few folks (myself included) had problems with ceiling condensation when it warmed quite suddenly.

Tommy_Paine

My eldest just got back from an extended stay in Ireland, Boom Boom.  Condensation like that is something they contend with regularly. 

Rebecca West and I are trying to keep the thermostat at 68 F, but we find it cold at times. I'm always putting on and taking off a sweater.  68 seems fine if you are doing stuff, but when you are at rest, you get cold. 

My daughter complains that we have it "roasting" in the house all the time.

As far as ice goes, I use ice melt products when I have to, although I am going to try to stay away from it this year.  So far so good.  It means being a bit more dillegent in snow removal.  I forget where I saw them, but I did see cleats for sale somewhere, that strap on to the bottoms of your boots.  

 

Bookish Agrarian

Dollop?  I have noticed that trend.  I guess when the weather is no longer quite so predicatable in terms of the rythm of the seasons you throw caution to the wind.  The worse I heard was last year when they actually used the term "snow-magaddon" in a bulliten for a major storm system.  Someone needs to play more solitaire on the computer at work and calm down a bit I think.

 

My Dad always talked about a skiff of snow.  That was just a small amount- sort of a dusting I guess.  Neither of us could ever figure out where that came from.  He got it from his Dad.

 

We have that yellow clay too.  It is a bit like pig shit.  Once stuck on your boots or clothing, it ain't ever coming off no matter how hard you try, some will still be sticking to you.

remind remind's picture

I actually heard that term "snow-magaddon" for the first time last evening and thought; "WTF? It is pretty damn bad when end of days biblical terms start being co-opted for weather".

___________________________________________________________

"watching the tide roll away"

Caissa

It snowed hard in SJ yesterdaywith many accidents. They even postponed the 2 p.m. exams at the university for 24 hours.

 

9 posts until this thread is closed for length.

Tommy_Paine

And when it's closed, since we will talk about weather, can we move it to some forum less serious than "environmental justice"?  Banter?  it seems more atune, and less likely to take away from more serious subjects concering the environment.

 

Yeah, I heard "snow-mageddon" too.  Yesterday, they said we could see up to 50cm from tonight to monday morning.  Today, somewhat less.

"Snow Mageddon" reminds me of "Kent Brockman" on the "Camp Krusty" episode of the "Simpsons":  "I've been to Vietnam.  I've been to Afghanistan.  And I can say without danger of hyperbole, that this is a million times worse."

 When I was a teen, London was subjected to a bona fide blizzard, that killed a number of people.  One, not a ten minute walk from where I lived at the time. 

Let's restrict the mellodramtics for when it's really called for.

 

"We have that yellow clay too.  It is a bit like pig shit.  Once stuck on your boots or clothing, it ain't ever coming off no matter how hard you try, some will still be sticking to you. "

 Funny you should say "pig shit" because unlike the heavier but less sticky clay on the other side of the Thames, where I grew up, this stuff really touches off the "unclean" taboo alarm, probably deep inside my hypothalamus somewhere.  Like, you can't wash enough to get it off.

I rather fancy that the distinctive yellow brick (called "London Brick" in some circles)  was made with this clay.

 

Brian White

I made my cob shed from that type of pig shit clay mixed with sand and straw. And this year I gave it a few coatings of limewash to make it semi waterproof.

I have always wondered why cob HAS to be mised by hand and sculpted by hand too. (Because the environmentalist hippy movement took it over, i guess?)

 I mix by wheelbarrow.  Seriously this material could be really useful for buildings if people just used forms made from expanded metal (to allow it to dry) and mixed with machines.  Lots of low outbuildings for animals could be made with it. It is very cheap.

Artic outflow?  Guess that means the artic is now warmer because a bunch of cold has left it and  has came to us? I know people will be using the cold snap as proof that global warming is not happening. 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

The temperature got up to a balmy -26 today.  Weirdly, it does seem balmy after the severe wind chills of earlier this week.  We even got some snow last night.  The weather forecast says we won't see higher than -20 this week. 

I think I need a down parka for Christmas.

Tommy_Paine

"Seriously this material could be really useful for buildings..."

How does it stand up to wet weather, though? 

Tommy_Paine

Ah, well, "Snowmageddon" is upon us.  It started here in London at about 600 AM.

I got Snarfy the Wonder Girl to school, only to find an empty building.  should have listened to the radio, I guess. School cancelled-- although, I had no real problem driving there.   Apparently, they are more concerned with how conditions might be towards afternoon.

And, with good reason.  I kinda scoffed at this storm, because it really isn't calling for that much snow.  However, the winds are high, and the snow granular, or sugary. 20cm of dense snow in drifts is going to be a problem. 

But, I wouldn't call it "Snowmageddon".

 

 

oldgoat

I booked off today and made plans which involve being indoors.  I'm enjoying looking out the window.  Oshawa is only pretty when it's totally covered in something.

 

I also arranged this year for a sevice to do our snow.

 

I'm lookin' good. 

 

 

This is a tagline. It has nothing to do with the comments posted above. Just a tagline...really. Please disregard.

remind remind's picture

-30 here, and apparently is going to be for awhile,  with almost no snowfall, too bad it is too late for the extended cold to kill the pine beetles and save the trees. As the trees are all dead or almost dead now anyway. 2 years too late it seems.

___________________________________________________________

"watching the tide roll away"

Michelle

I'm going to close this for length and open a new one in the "out and about" forum.

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