American Mid-Term Elections

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Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

 

Please fell free to support or challenge who ever you like... I supported Obama in 2008 and I just did my best to support him this election. Oh and for the record I do not view him as the lesser of two evils... I think he's doing ok considering what he walked into and what's happened to our economy... the people who supported him in 2008 and are disappointed in him now are mostly the one's who thought he could fix stuff with the click of his fingers and or maybe some thought he'd come driving through their neighborhoods snow blowing 100 dollar bills at them; fuck I don't know. He has to fix the economy first, he can't fix everything at once, it don't work that way unfortunately. It's like when the oil well was leaking into the Gulf. We had this one guy at work that just could not stop blaming Obama for "not doing anything". Finally I asked him what the fuck Obama he thinks should do; Slap on a dive suit and swim down there and stick his thumb in the hole or something?

If the economy gets better and become less a "distraction" I think we'd see him get more active on the social and other world issues you seem so passionate about...  he's already got us health care... well sort of, but that's another thread.   

al-Qa'bong

George Victor wrote:

Thanks, Sven.

The viewers hereabouts need to read that...the bit about it being "highly unlikely that anyone left of Obama would have even a remote chance of being elected president in a general election."

Yeah, file that bit of wisdom under the "No shirt, Sherlock" category.  Moderates like Kucinich are treated like space aliens thereabouts for their radical views.  We can always hope for massive flooding (it could happen - ask the majority of yanquis who believe in a literal interpretation of the Bible) to wash the US clean. 

That or race riots.

al-Qa'bong

My own post reminded me of something:

 

Come and Join the No-Shirt Party

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Moderates like Kucinich are treated like space aliens thereabouts for their radical views. 


Treated like "space aliens" by whom? Democrats?
al-Qa'bong wrote:
 
We can always hope for massive flooding (it could happen - ask the majority of yanquis who believe in a literal interpretation of the Bible) to wash the US clean. 
That or race riots.

My aren't you the bitter one...Tongue out

josh

 

"The great mass of people in the US occupy a center-right position on the political spectrum."

 

Wow. I've never heard that before. I guess if you repeat a shibboleth long enough, it becomes accepted fact. Except it's not true.

When you get to specific issues, like taxes, health insurance and government regulation, polling shows that the "mass" is not

center-right, but, at least, center-left. The problem is that, philosophically, the "mass' will often agree with the right-wing

shibboleths. Which makes them appear more conservative than they actually are.

 

 

"It is highly unlikely that anyone left of Obama would have even a remote chance of being elected president in a general election."

 

 

And what, pray tell, makes Obama, in any sense, left? Another instance where perception and reality do not meet.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

josh wrote:

And what, pray tell, makes Obama, in any sense, left?  Another instance where perception and reality do not meet.

All the right of me republicans at work say so?Laughing

I think he was saying "LEFT of him" not "HE IS LEFT". Myself, I think he's a more a shotgun blast aimed center mass.

 

(I like your assessment of US political attitudes by the way, good post.)

Sven Sven's picture

josh wrote:

"It is highly unlikely that anyone left of Obama would have even a remote chance of being elected president in a general election."

 And what, pray tell, makes Obama, in any sense, left?  Another instance where perception and reality do not meet.

Perhaps you didn't understand my comment.  I wasn't asserting that Obama is a bona fide Lefty.  Let's just assume that he occupies a political position that is dead-center on the political spectrum (or even tilts right).  I still believe that it's very unlikely that Americans will vote for someone Left of Obama.

With regard to the election in eleven days, this report by the [url=Pew">http://people-press.org/report/?pageid=1824][u]Pew Research Center[/url] basically indicates to me that it's lights out for the Democrats in the House.  The "enthusiasm gap" among likely voters which is highlighted in the Pew report significantly favors the Repubs (there is an almost unprecedented 10% gap favoring the Repubs).

josh

It depends on what you mean by "left."  If you're talking about someone who's more "socially liberal" than Obama, you could be right.  But if you're talking about someone who's an economic populist, unlike the corporate, passionless, detached, politically inept, technocrat in the white house, you'd be wrong.

As for the midterms, there's no question, based on the generic polls, that Democrats will suffer losses in the house anywhere between 40 and 60 seats.  But the thing I'm seeing is that they're not doing as badly as one would expect from those polls in the individual races.  They're still leading, or close behind, in many seats thought to be lost.  So, the opportunity remains for them to minimize their losses.

 

al-Qa'bong

Don't be a stranger, Josh.

George Victor

Bec.De.Corbin wrote:

josh wrote:

And what, pray tell, makes Obama, in any sense, left?  Another instance where perception and reality do not meet.

All the right of me republicans at work say so?Laughing

I think he was saying "LEFT of him" not "HE IS LEFT". Myself, I think he's a more a shotgun blast aimed center mass.

 

(I like your assessment of US political attitudes by the way, good post.)

 

And BDC, I really like the way that an American's statement about sentiment at his workplace, "all the right of me Republicans at work say so," cuts through the tired attempts hereabouts to paint a picture of pent up left-wing insurrection in the American workplace, waiting to be released at a word from a Democratic African-American president out of Harvard endowed with powers that lift him above constitutional limitations.

Thank you. 

Sven will not release his own thoughts about developments except to rub in the fact (from his own Libertarian, i've got it made in the shade position), that the Democrats are gonzo.  That "news" is available from the NY Times.

And how obsessing on the Democrats' discomfort is going to help the poor bastards down there with not-a-life chances, I'm sure I don't know.  Maybe it starts in childhood, pulling wings off flies?

 

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

...cuts through the tired attempts hereabouts to paint a picture of pent up left-wing insurrection in the American workplace, waiting to be released at a word from a Democratic African-American president out of Harvard endowed with powers that lift him above constitutional limitations.

Are hallucinogens legal where you live?  Who hereabouts said this?

Sven Sven's picture

josh wrote:

It depends on what you mean by "left."  If you're talking about someone who's more "socially liberal" than Obama, you could be right.  But if you're talking about someone who's an economic populist, unlike the corporate, passionless, detached, politically inept, technocrat in the white house, you'd be wrong. 

Your observation certainly makes a noteworthy distinction (i.e., social versus economic).  But, even if a leftwing economic populist ran for the presidency (and social issues were irrelevant), Americans are simply not nearly as left-leaning as, say, most Europeans are -- even on purely economic issues.

As I've said here many times before, those who occupy the middle of the political spectrum in the US (i.e., the independents) are the ones who dictate who has power here (only about 20% of the population self-identifies as being progressive or "liberal").  And, if you look at the issues that are driving those independents into the arms of the Republicans right now, the issues are almost exclusively economic in nature and the concerns are principally about the ballooning amount of debt (particularly as it relates to long-term entitlement programs and public-employee pension obligations) and jobs.

An economic populist wouldn't stand a chance.

George Victor

Clearly!

 

Top Companies Aid Chamber of Commerce in Policy Fights
By ERIC LIPTON, MIKE McINTIRE and DON VAN NATTA Jr.
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, now a leading force against Obama administration policies, has received sizable donations from top corporations including Dow Chemical and Goldman Sachs.

 

And that was largely made possible, only a few weeks ago,  by a Supreme Court to the right of Vlad the Impaler.

 

You're only telling us the obvious, Sven. And this does not please or displease, you.  You are just a neutral observer, the fly on the U.S. wallUndecided

ndpwannabe

Sven wrote:

josh wrote:

It depends on what you mean by "left."  If you're talking about someone who's more "socially liberal" than Obama, you could be right.  But if you're talking about someone who's an economic populist, unlike the corporate, passionless, detached, politically inept, technocrat in the white house, you'd be wrong. 

Your observation certainly makes a noteworthy distinction (i.e., social versus economic).  But, even if a leftwing economic populist ran for the presidency (and social issues were irrelevant), Americans are simply not nearly as left-leaning as, say, most Europeans are -- even on purely economic issues.

As I've said here many times before, those who occupy the middle of the political spectrum in the US (i.e., the independents) are the ones who dictate who has power here (only about 20% of the population self-identifies as being progressive or "liberal").  And, if you look at the issues that are driving those independents into the arms of the Republicans right now, the issues are almost exclusively economic in nature and the concerns are principally about the ballooning amount of debt (particularly as it relates to long-term entitlement programs and public-employee pension obligations) and jobs.

An economic populist wouldn't stand a chance.

______________________________________________________

Sven, I have to disagree with you on that.  The Democrats have been so inept and bought off by corporate interests that they can not and will not be the left economic populists that they need to be.

But there are signs of hope:

I was talking the other day with a Democratic candidate for the Iowa legislature whose district would be a more conservative western suburb of Des Moines. He is getting a good response at the doors of voters, even Republicans, when he talks to them about the maldistribution of wealth in this country.

Sven, remember the recent poll that said that forty percent of those Americans polled thought that the health care "reform" should have gone FARTHER.

Remember the recent poll (which I can not find now), which indicated that when those Americans were polled, a large percentage of them preferred the more equitable distribution of wealth (like in Sweden) as an ideal system, under which they would like to live.

Is the American "working class" storming the barricades? No. But these are signs of hope for the possibility of a renewed US Left.

takeitslowly

Well, my posts might not be getting love on rabble but at least two men i respect alot agree with me, Gore Videl and Daniel Choi

"Dreadfully. I was hopeful. He was the most intelligent person we've had in that position for a long time. But he's inexperienced. He has a total inability to understand military matters. He's acting as if Afghanistan is the magic talisman: Solve that and you solve terrorism ... we've failed in every other aspect of our effort of conquering the Middle East or whatever you want to call it."
Talking about Obama's efforts at health care reform, he adds, "He fucked it up. I don't know how because the country wanted it. We'll never see it happen."

http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/blog-1001-gore-vidal-obama-a-disappointment.html

Lt. Dan Choi, a gay soldier discharged from the U.S. Army under "don't ask, don't tell," said Thursday

 

"You have lost my trust and I am not gonna vote for Barack Obama after what he did yesterday," Choi said in an interview with CNN today.

 

 

"When Congress enacts a law that's unconstitutional, whose job is it to strike it down? The court's," Choi said. "I understand the judicial branch is now the only branch of government that is filling its mandate to the Constitution."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/10/21/dan-choi-barack-obama_n_771634....

George Victor

George Victor wrote:

 

Top Companies Aid Chamber of Commerce in Policy Fights
By ERIC LIPTON, MIKE McINTIRE and DON VAN NATTA Jr.
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, now a leading force against Obama administration policies, has received sizable donations from top corporations including Dow Chemical and Goldman Sachs.

 

And that was largely made possible, only a few weeks ago,  by a Supreme Court to the right of Vlad the Impaler.

 

 

Choi does not understand that the Supreme Court's decision to allow corporate funding will ensure the demise of the only political faction in the U.S. that is trying to work on his behalf.  You'd think that someone in his position would be more politically conscious of what is happening around him on the RIGHT.

takeitslowly

But unlike Choi, do you understand what it is like to be told that you are not good enough to serve country because of what you are? I understand exactly why he no longer trust the double speak of the Obama administration. The most important thing a person have, imo, is their dignity and Choi is only doing what any self respecting person would do by expressing his total dismay at the Obama administration.

takeitslowly

But unlike Choi, do you understand what it is like to be told that you are not good enough to serve country because of what you are? I understand exactly why he no longer trust the double speak of the Obama administration. The most important thing a person have, imo, is their dignity and Choi is only doing what any self respecting person would do by expressing his total dismay at the Obama administration.

George Victor

takeitslowly wrote:

But unlike Choi, do you understand what it is like to be told that you are not good enough to serve country because of what you are? I understand exactly why he no longer trust the double speak of the Obama administration. The most important thing a person have, imo, is their dignity and Choi is only doing what any self respecting person would do by expressing his total dismay at the Obama administration.

 

I understand the concept "cutting off one's nose to spite one's face."

DaveW

josh wrote:
As for the midterms, there's no question, based on the generic polls, that Democrats will suffer losses in the house anywhere between 40 and 60 seats.  But the thing I'm seeing is that they're not doing as badly as one would expect from those polls in the individual races.  They're still leading, or close behind, in many seats thought to be lost.  So, the opportunity remains for them to minimize their losses.

I agree ...

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/24/opinion/24greenberg.html?ref=global

 [in 1998] ...Republicans doubled down on their misguided strategy - highlighting the impeachment and the ensuing scandal with a late advertising blitz.

And the result?

Democrats surprised everyone: no net losses in the Senate and a net gain of five seats in the House - the best showing for the incumbent president's party in a midterm election since 1934. Newt Gingrich resigned.

wage zombie

The unpredictable Election

Quote:

This is the most unpredictable election in my memory, and, indeed, I can't even think of one that rivals it.

I'm not alone in that assessment. Just as Nate Silver was projecting a 50-seat gain for the GOP in the House, he couched in the caveat that the uncertainty of the races could mean as small a pickup for the Republicans as 20 seats, and as much as 80 seats. Such a wide range of possible outcomes made a few people smirk at the "prediction." But from where I sit, that's a pretty appropriate assessment of the landscape.

In short, there are very few outcomes in nine days that would surprise me. And that is because so little about this election cycle is definitively known.

NDPP

Fascist America, Is This Election the Next Turn?

http://www.alternet.org/story/148588/fascist_america:_is_this_election_t...

"According to Paxton, there are 3 quick questions that let you know you've crossed that fail-safe line beyond which an emerging fascist regime has too much power to be stopped..."

Republican Congressional Candidate Says Violent Overthrow of Government is 'On the Table'

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/texassouthwest/stories/...

"Republican congressional candidate Stephen Broden stunned his party Thursday, saying he would not rule out violent overthrow of the government if elections did not produce a change in leadership...In a rambling exchange during a TV interview, Broden, a South Dallas pastor, said a violent uprising 'is not the first option but it is 'on the table'.."

josh

Sven wrote:

And, if you look at the issues that are driving those independents into the arms of the Republicans right now, the issues are almost exclusively economic in nature and the concerns are principally about the ballooning amount of debt (particularly as it relates to long-term entitlement programs and public-employee pension obligations) and jobs.

An economic populist wouldn't stand a chance.

When a group of voters, who will respond to a economic populist appeal, are presented with faux populism and no populism which one do you think they will choose?  And other voters, for whom upper middle class teabagism holds no appeal, will not even bother to vote.

 

Sven Sven's picture

More evidence that it is the independent voter who decides who has power in America: [url=Politico.com[/url]. ">http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1010/44092.html][=blue][u]Poli... The polls are generally indicating a decisive shift by independents from supporting the Dems to supporting the Repubs -- which, to me, belies the claim that independents are angry because Obama failed to govern enough to the Left.

George Victor

Right on, Sven.....gosh, what am I saying?   But then, if you see how the Republicans are using the old populist spiel again, and the average voter hasn't the foggiest...   Read Robert Reich's After-Shock to understand that the average person is frightened shitless about their inability to stay solvent, hold on to the house, eat...  They don't know that people of wealth set them up for the fall, three decades back.

josh

Sven wrote:

More evidence that it is the independent voter who decides who has power in America: [url=Politico.com[/url]. ">http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1010/44092.html][=blue][u]Poli... The polls are generally indicating a decisive shift by independents from supporting the Dems to supporting the Repubs -- which, to me, belies the claim that independents are angry because Obama failed to govern enough to the Left.

If many independents are switching their support, and Obama has not governed sufficiently as a left/populist, how does it follow that more would have switched had he done so?  After all, as you say, independents went for Obama in '08, when he promised, among other things, to raise taxes on the wealthy and have a public option.  The former has yet to come to pass, and he abandoned the latter.  If they voted for him when he was promising an agenda further to the left than how he has governed, how would governing more to the left have cause more to switch?  The answer:  "it's the economy, stupid."  As to that:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/25/opinion/25krugman.html?_r=1&ref=opinion

George Victor

Krugman:

"The tragedy here is that if voters do turn on Democrats, they will in effect be voting to make things even worse.

The resurgent Republicans have learned nothing from the economic crisis, except that doing everything they can to undermine Mr. Obama is a winning political strategy. Tax cuts and deregulation are still the alpha and omega of their economic vision."

 

 

It would be so nice to see Sven put himself on the line (not just baiting) and say what he thinks of Krugman's summation of the situation....a dumbed down U.S.electorate is about to do itself injury by returning Republicans to power.

NDPP

The World Liberal Opportunists Made - by Chris Hedges

http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/the_world_liberal_opportunists_made_...

"The legitimate rage being experienced by disenfranchised workers towards the college-educated liberal elite, who abetted and did nothing to halt the corporate assault on the poor and the working class of the last 30 years is not misplaced. The liberal class is guilty."

 

DaveW

one more time:

it ain't over till it's over

http://www.newsweek.com/2010/10/25/how-the-democrats-can-prevail.html?from=rss

Still, for the Democrats to retain control of the House, a number of things have to happen. First, the base has to get re-fired up. Recently Obama has been drawing big crowds reminiscent of the heady days of '08. He has to keep at it. Second, Obama must do more in the next week to make his economic case, and to clarify the choice facing voters: which party and which candidate has a reasonable chance of making things better? The White House has garbled its message on this until now. Obama must persuade voters to allow him more time, and to give his policies a chance to work.

 

George Victor

Quote:

"The legitimate rage being experienced by disenfranchised workers towards the college-educated liberal elite, who abetted and did nothing to halt the corporate assault on the poor and the working class of the last 30 years is not misplaced. The liberal class is guilty."
 
 
Somehow, the sources for this idea (Hedges) and people who just mindlessly repeat it (NDPP) conveniently forget that from the mid-90s takeover of Congress until the end of the Bush regime (2008) it was Republicans who fashioned the U.S. (world) economy. The "liberal class" is guilty of an obvious selfishness, the neo-con, oil-fed, racist class is guilty of deceit and naughtiness for playing games with such a dumb, politically immature crowd.
I'll stick to Joe Bageant's "dumb as a bag of hair" explanation for the whole shootin' match.
In his latest feedblitz piece, he notes how the demise of American working-class opportunity really began thirty years ago with Reagan:
Algorithms and Red Wine
Life is lived anecdotally, not algorithmically. And anecdotal evidence is not allowed in the new digital corpocracy. As one poster on Democratic Underground put it, "Anecdotal now has this enforced meaning such that no one is supposed to believe what they experience, what they see, hear, taste, smell, etc.

George Victor

Bageant, in Italy:

And I look at the faces of these young men and women, who are among the brightest, best educated and common good oriented the world has to offer. A taxi's headlights flash through the window of the darkened bottiliberia. Each face is illuminated for a moment, then golden dimness again prevails. And I am saddened.

I do not expect that the world they have inherited will show them one ounce of mercy. But it is heartening to see clear competent minds drawing the right conclusions.

And I ask myself, what chance does America's far less informed, and purposefully misled public stand against all this?

One shudders.

NDPP

Good piece GV. One shudders indeed.

Sven Sven's picture

While it is certainly possible that all of the polling is wrong and that the Dems will retain control of the House, [url=The">http://cookpolitical.com/][u]The Cook Political Report[/url] (which the Bible of non-partisan election analysis in America) is now predicting that the Repubs will have a 20- to 40-seat majority (and possibly more) in the House after next Tuesday's election.

The Cook Political Report is also predicting that the Senate will (barely) stay in Democrat hands (in part because only about 1/3 of the 100 Senate seats are up for election in this election cycle, in contrast to the House where all 435 seats are up for election next week).

jrootham

I just saw the polling for Grayson.  He looks like toast.  Fuck.

 

 

Sven Sven's picture

jrootham wrote:

I just saw the polling for Grayson.  He looks like toast.

Yeah, the polling numbers look to be unchanged from a month ago (Grayson still down by 7%).

George Victor

Sven wrote:

jrootham wrote:

I just saw the polling for Grayson.  He looks like toast.

Yeah, the polling numbers look to be unchanged from a month ago (Grayson still down by 7%).

 

Yeah, and you still refuse to take a position yourself, Sven.  What a wuss.  Small wonder the Land of the Free isn't.

NDPP

Say No or Surrender

http://chris-floyd.com/articles/1-latest-news/2038-say-no-or-surrender-p...

"And if we are about to get another gaggle of rapacious, rightwing geese flapping into the corridors of power, it is precisely because the Democrats long ago sold out, lock, stock and millions of smoking barrels to the corporate-militarist elite, leaving no genuine institutional outlets of opposition to corporate rapine, continual war and state tyranny with the American political system.."

The Democratic Party has become the enabler...and the eager, avid enactor--of the same sinister, inhumane, corrosive and murderous politics that liberals, progressives, dissenters, true patriots (call them what you will) once fought so hard to resist.."

 

George Victor

Yeah, exactly the situation as it is explained to your average citizen out there and undoubtedly why they are so motivated to bring about change, all other intervening factors considered, of course. Laughing

Joe Bageant would not argue with that...although he always wants to add the factor of a dumbed-down populace, for some reason.

NDPP

"Empire inflicts a warped and hyper-attenuated state of being upon its citizens, all the distortions of national character present in privileged grotesques and ordinary monsters...The US Empire is dead meat."

Everyday is Halloween in Empire - by Phil Rockstroh

http://www.countercurrents.org/rockstroh261010.htm

Sean in Ottawa

Just heard President Carter on the CBC today.

I always liked him compared with everything else the US threw up but he really seems to have reached critical understandings.

He spoke of Iran when asked what to do if Iran had the bomb. He said their capacity if they did get the bomb would be very limited and if he were president he would be considering his intelligence as to whether he thought the country was suicidal before doing anything. He calls for full diplomatic relations with Iran or at least full communication and does not support the pressuring of that country as the US has been doing.

He was asked about the mid-east. There he said that the key  issue is that Israel and Egypt have lived up to the agreement with no violations but the problem today is that Israel had committed to leave the occupied areas and that occupation is the obstacle to any progress. Israels repeated violations of that agreement have distressed him through the years. He did not couch or qualify this in any way. This is the problem. Period.

Afghanistan he says was a US failure since if the country had been supported with aid earlier it would have been fine. He does not see the current war turning out well for anyone. He points out that he never used war on other countries during his presidency (I'd have to check this).

I did not hear the whole interview but that is some of what I got out of it.

al-Qa'bong

Quote:
He points out that he never used war on other countries during his presidency (I'd have to check this).

 

You could start by googling "zbigniew brzezinski afghanistan."

wage zombie
Rob8305

It's looking like the Dems are poised for a Kim Campbell style landslide and are going to be obliterated.

Some are thinking that they will lose 129 house seats and 15 senate seats. 39 and 10 are the numbers to flip control.

This may be the death of the democratic party.

DaveW

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Quote:
He points out that he never used war on other countries during his presidency (I'd have to check this).

 You could start by googling "zbigniew brzezinski afghanistan."

while you are at it, also google "Soviet army 85,000 Afghanistan Christmas day 1979"

Back to the subject: I have been an optimist, but Obama headed for bigger losses than initially seen. Let's hope he can still steer the ship somehow, or chaos.

 

 

Sven Sven's picture

DaveW wrote:

Back to the subject: I have been an optimist, but Obama headed for bigger losses than initially seen.

If you go back to the link in the OP, look at the "Battle for the House" chart just below the map of the USA.  The trend has been unmistakable throughout the month of October: The independent voters have been breaking hard for the GOP.

It's over for Dem control of the House.  The only remaining question is: How big will the GOP majority be?

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

Sven wrote:

If you go back to the link in the OP, look at the "Battle for the House" chart just below the map of the USA.  The trend has been unmistakable throughout the month of October: The independent voters have been breaking hard for the GOP.

It's over for Dem control of the House.  The only remaining question is: How big will the GOP majority be?

 

Yes its the independent voters are the ones who are flip flopping after only two years... this erratic voting behavior is killing us down here. It looks like two years of grid locked congress; that is not good.

 

Stargazer

Bec.De.Corbin - looks like you have a lot to deal with today and tomorrow. My thoughts are with you and all of my American friends these next two days. May sanity prevail, and failing that, we can offer you honorary Canadian citizenship (although once you see harper, you may want to pack up and go back)

jrootham

Real Clear Politics is Republican oriented.  FiveThiryEight is the gold standard for looking at polling and making projections.  Centrist Democrat in attitude with a ferocious attention to the facts.  

He is also projecting 232 Republican House members, which is 53 seat swing, I think.   However, he is also asserting that this election has a high degree of uncertainty.

NDPP

Sing It Clowns  -  by Arthur Silber

http://powerofnarrative.blogspot.com/2010/10/sing-it-clowns.html

"La commedia e finita. - the last line of Pagliacci, when everyone is dead, or as good as. For the moment, that is all that should be said about the historically historic election in history that is almost upon us..

And what is 'finished' is not merely the illusion of participatory democracy, (you actually believed that shit, dinnit ya? I did too when I was much stupider) but the United States in anything remotely approaching the form in which you had ever believed it to exist. It's over, done, kaput -- finita, baby...

And not so by the way:

this is especially addressed to all those -- on the right, the left and anywhere else -- who continue to cling to the fantasy that the US might yet be 'reformed' or 'saved'. Part of the genius of the system (and this form of genius is hardly restricted to the US; study some history when you're killing time someday) is that it's set up precisely to make 'reformation' and 'salvation' irreversible.

The system was set up on a course for this from the very beginning a hundred years ago. The system finally eats itself entirely, and then it's done. I'm telling ya, sweetheart, history. So I repeat: Sing it clowns..."

Maysie Maysie's picture

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