The Coup in Egypt

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Rikardo
The Coup in Egypt

No one has opened this topic on Babble it seems.  Some on the Left see this as the People speaking. But others like Doug Bandow (antiwar.com, etc.) and Brendon O'Neill (spiked.com) as well as others on Counterpunch see the hand of the US and a similarity to Algeria in 1992 where the army intervened against the Islam Salvation Front with the support of the Algeria Socialist Party and France.  Many of the anti-MB (Muslim Brotherhood) people are Westernized liberals.  Will the MB, who won the election only a year ago turn to the tactics used by the frustrated losers in Algeria?

Issues Pages: 
autoworker autoworker's picture

Rikardo wrote:

No one has opened this topic on Babble it seems.  Some on the Left see this as the People speaking. But others like Doug Bandow (antiwar.com, etc.) and Brendon O'Neill (spiked.com) as well as others on Counterpunch see the hand of the US and a similarity to Algeria in 1992 where the army intervened against the Islam Salvation Front with the support of the Algeria Socialist Party and France.  Many of the anti-MB (Muslim Brotherhood) people are Westernized liberals.  Will the MB, who won the election only a year ago turn to the tactics used by the frustrated losers in Algeria?

There are also many professionals amongst Morsi's following. We'll see. If no elections are held before this year's end, then it's a coup. Of course events in Syria, and Turkey could effect that outcome. This is only the beginning of the next chapter of another book of what's now an epic that began in 1919. There's also a parallel, lamentable, Western narrative to compliment that saga.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

The military overthrew an elected government. It is a coup. If the MB boycotts any elections conducted by the military whatever government that is elected will lack legitimacy. It is unlikely the military cares. They never cared about a lack of legitimacy the entire time they propped up Mubarak. The Muslim Brotherhood would be well advised to boycott elections, establish a shadow government that has the legitimacy of having been democratically elected, and plan to return to power with a mandate to purge the military, bureacracy, and to sieze and dismantle private owned corporations with too much economic and political power.

What the MB has is time. The Egyptian economy will not get better, corruption and the kleptocracy will continue as before, the lives of young Egyptians will not improve, and illegitimate government imposed by the military will eventually falter and fail as the discontented take to the streets once more.

autoworker autoworker's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:

The military overthrew an elected government. It is a coup. If the MB boycotts any elections conducted by the military whatever government that is elected will lack legitimacy. It is unlikely the military cares. They never cared about a lack of legitimacy the entire time they propped up Mubarak. The Muslim Brotherhood would be well advised to boycott elections, establish a shadow government that has the legitimacy of having been democratically elected, and plan to return to power with a mandate to purge the military, bureacracy, and to sieze and dismantle private owned corporations with too much economic and political power.

What the MB has is time. The Egyptian economy will not get better, corruption and the kleptocracy will continue as before, the lives of young Egyptians will not improve, and illegitimate government imposed by the military will eventually falter and fail as the discontented take to the streets once more.

Yes, a coup is a coup is a coup. But, once elected, didn't the MB hijack democracy? What of the persecution of minorities? Perhaps it's prudent to hit 'reset', and try again in the near future.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

Quote:
Yes, a coup is a coup is a coup. But, once elected, didn't the MB hijack democracy? What of the persecution of minorities? Perhaps it's prudent to hit 'reset', and try again in the near future.

Then why shouldn't that apply to any democratically elected government? Our own Conservative Party has hijacked democracy, and has demonized many segments of society. Do you prefer the military evict them and impose marshall law to overthrowing them at the polls? Certainly Obama, who has less of a mandate than Morse had, as he won runoff elections, has hijacked democracy, murdered Americans with drones, and imposed a surviellance state. Should the Pentagon depose him?

You can say what you want about Morsi, and I certainly didn't like him, but he was elected in Egypt's most free and fair elections ever. And he was deposed by a military coup. So what democratically elected government in Egypt will ever be safe from the military? None. Unless Morsi is returned, democracy in Egypt is a sick joke.

autoworker autoworker's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:

Quote:
Yes, a coup is a coup is a coup. But, once elected, didn't the MB hijack democracy? What of the persecution of minorities? Perhaps it's prudent to hit 'reset', and try again in the near future.

Then why shouldn't that apply to any democratically elected government? Our own Conservative Party has hijacked democracy, and has demonized many segments of society. Do you prefer the military evict them and impose marshall law to overthrowing them at the polls? Certainly Obama, who has less of a mandate than Morse had, as he won runoff elections, has hijacked democracy, murdered Americans with drones, and imposed a surviellance state. Should the Pentagon depose him?

You can say what you want about Morsi, and I certainly didn't like him, but he was elected in Egypt's most free and fair elections ever. And he was deposed by a military coup. So what democratically elected government in Egypt will ever be safe from the military? None. Unless Morsi is returned
, democracy in Egypt is a sick joke.

Ask me about Canada when there's blood in our streets. In the meantime, the military is the only functioning institution in Egypt. I hope democracy gets back on track, there, and elsewhere in the Arab world.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i see things different..sort of. for instance it’s not the harper gov that hijacked democracy it was the corporations, the elite, capital. everything all neat and tidy with no real challenge on the electoral front. or so i see. we have yet to confront that demon. we settle for harper..the puppet.

..not so in egypt. they are facing their demon..the military/neoliberalism. and yes they have divisions just as we do here and would have if we ever took the struggle to that level. but there’s a segment of egyptions that are determined to make change. the risks are high but so are they globally. this struggle is new, it is not part of the old and history counts but still this is new as it teaches us how to confront the forces that are raining destruction and austerity on our heads. take the streets 1st then concern yourself about elections. direct democracy. a place we need to go imho.

eta: just so you know there was/is a discussion going on here.

http://rabble.ca/babble/activism/egyptian-revolution-iv

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from democrcy now but out of egypt, recently the gov signed a secret agreement with the imf. no one was consulted. the details are yet to be released but count on brutal poverty. points were made that this will be a reason to come back out in large numbers as well the need confront authoritarianism.

Rikardo

Interesting opinions.  Macleans' Michael Petrou reminded me that the Egyptian election (unlike Canada) gives voters a second choice for one of the top two so that that the elected have a majority (over 50%) instead of the 35% that sometimes elects a New Democrat in Canada (for 4 years at $160,000 a year).  Wonder why the NDP never pushed for the more democratic Preferential (Alternate) Vote, like in Australia, etc. ?? Anyway, Morsi only got 25% in the first vote and won over the former PM in the second. Living in Quebec I'm wary of "activists" (last spring) who think they represent the "people".

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Egypt: coup or continuation of the revolution?

In this short documentary, the Mosireen collective in Cairo shows why, despite facing grave challenges, the revolutionary process in Egypt continues.

“We are not alone. The whole world is going through a revolutionary phase that will take us to a new era. Brazil. Egypt. Turkey. Chile. Greece. Spain. It is obvious that people now understand that ballot boxes are just a means for the elite to monopolize power. People express their real opinions in the street. All of this is threatening the hegemony of powerful states. Regimes are trying to contain revolutionary moments everywhere. June 30 in Egypt is just one example… It is our responsibility not to let our revolution be stolen from us again. Glory to the people! The revolution continues!”

English and Portuguese subtitles available (click the captions button):

http://roarmag.org/2013/07/egypt-coup-or-continuation-of-the-revolution/

 coup or continuation of the revolution?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Rikardo wrote:

Interesting opinions.  Macleans' Michael Petrou reminded me that the Egyptian election (unlike Canada) gives voters a second choice for one of the top two so that that the elected have a majority (over 50%) instead of the 35% that sometimes elects a New Democrat in Canada (for 4 years at $160,000 a year).  Wonder why the NDP never pushed for the more democratic Preferential (Alternate) Vote, like in Australia, etc. ?? Anyway, Morsi only got 25% in the first vote and won over the former PM in the second. Living in Quebec I'm wary of "activists" (last spring) who think they represent the "people".

..i've always looked at the que students as "the people". i don't think i'm wrong in this.

Rikardo

 Counterpunch is good on Egypt. Is this "the people" ?

Check http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/07/18/on-those-protest-numbers-in-egypt/

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Rikardo wrote:

 Counterpunch is good on Egypt. Is this "the people" ?

Check http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/07/18/on-those-protest-numbers-in-egypt/

..yes i do consider them the people. that is if your refering to those who came into the street.

eta:

..you seem to have a definition of people that i disagree with. from what i see it's unnecessarily narrow. practically all my adult life i've been an activist. which is around 45 years. i think in tactics and strategies a lot and did while i worked. but i am people. so are my friends and the people i go to demos with or who i picket with on the dtes. whether you agree or not. who are not the people in this case is neoliberalism the military the police the media the corporations. it's a mistake to try and seperate people when in the midst of picthed battle. alliances are made at a grassroots level then changes happen. new alliances take place.  it is a time of learning and if we can't learn how to make real change our goose is cooked. elections don't do it anymore. all the politicos no longer have the power to carry out anyones demands except those that call the tune. we take charge ourselves if were every going to get out from this "cliff" we are on the edge of. many people see it this way. direct democracy is emerging globally and this is it's manifestation.

autoworker autoworker's picture

Are Coptic Christians people?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..yes they are. and in no way do i agree with what has happened to them. people can be so fucked up sometimes. there is a need for a better world than the one were living in. thats my point.

autoworker autoworker's picture

I've been taught to believe that a measure of a democracy is determined by the treatment of it's minorities. IMO, Morsi's government failed that test. What we are witnessing now is the result of that failure, and that of Egypt's economy.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..nicely put about the minorities. i have heard this often and ascribe to it myself.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

autoworker wrote:
Frustrated Mess wrote:

Quote:
Yes, a coup is a coup is a coup. But, once elected, didn't the MB hijack democracy? What of the persecution of minorities? Perhaps it's prudent to hit 'reset', and try again in the near future.

Then why shouldn't that apply to any democratically elected government? Our own Conservative Party has hijacked democracy, and has demonized many segments of society. Do you prefer the military evict them and impose marshall law to overthrowing them at the polls? Certainly Obama, who has less of a mandate than Morse had, as he won runoff elections, has hijacked democracy, murdered Americans with drones, and imposed a surviellance state. Should the Pentagon depose him?

You can say what you want about Morsi, and I certainly didn't like him, but he was elected in Egypt's most free and fair elections ever. And he was deposed by a military coup. So what democratically elected government in Egypt will ever be safe from the military? None. Unless Morsi is returned , democracy in Egypt is a sick joke.

Ask me about Canada when there's blood in our streets. In the meantime, the military is the only functioning institution in Egypt. I hope democracy gets back on track, there, and elsewhere in the Arab world.

 

There was no blood on the streets of Egypt for decades under Mubarak. So Mubarak had greater legitimacy than the elected government of Morsi?  And don't kid yourself that if people demanding an overthrow of Canada's government occupied a central square in Ottawa there wouldn't be blood. 1918? And that was just a march.

It is disturbing to me people will defend tyranny in the name of democracy.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

Egypt’s new power dynamic, following the July 3 coup that ousted Morsi, is eerily familiar. Gone are the Islamist rulers from the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood. Back are the faces of the old guard, many closely linked to Mubarak’s reign or to the all-powerful generals. And for a seemingly broad array of Egyptians, that’s exactly the way they want it.

 

At least there's no blood in the street. It's back in the dungeons and police torture rooms where it belongs.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/after-morsis-ouster-egypts-old-guard...

NDPP

Egypt: Do You Support A Military Coup D'etat in Egypt?

http://www.voltairenet.org/article179418.html

"Thierry Meyssan answers those of our readers who are worried by his support for the military coup d'etat in Egypt. For him, the coup did not put an end to democracy but to the confiscation of power by a putschist cult, the Muslim Brotherhood.

It was therefore legitimate, and was approved by all the other political parties and religious leaders before being celebrated in the streets.

The problem is not so much the intervention of the army, but its capacity to follow the road map towards democracy which it has negotiated with the political and religious leaders..."

autoworker autoworker's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:

autoworker wrote:
Frustrated Mess wrote:

Quote:
Yes, a coup is a coup is a coup. But, once elected, didn't the MB hijack democracy? What of the persecution of minorities? Perhaps it's prudent to hit 'reset', and try again in the near future.

Then why shouldn't that apply to any democratically elected government? Our own Conservative Party has hijacked democracy, and has demonized many segments of society. Do you prefer the military evict them and impose marshall law to overthrowing them at the polls? Certainly Obama, who has less of a mandate than Morse had, as he won runoff elections, has hijacked democracy, murdered Americans with drones, and imposed a surviellance state. Should the Pentagon depose him?

You can say what you want about Morsi, and I certainly didn't like him, but he was elected in Egypt's most free and fair elections ever. And he
was deposed by a military coup. So what democratically elected government in Egypt will ever be safe from the military? None. Unless Morsi is returned , democracy in Egypt is a sick joke.

Ask me about Canada when there's blood in our streets. In the meantime, the military is the only functioning institution in Egypt. I hope democracy gets back on track, there, and elsewhere in the Arab
world.

There was no blood on the streets of Egypt for decades under Mubarak. So Mubarak had greater legitimacy than the elected government of Morsi?  And don't kid yourself that if people demanding an overthrow of Canada's government occupied a central square in Ottawa there wouldn't be blood. 1918? And that was just a march.

It is disturbing to me people will defend tyranny in the name of democracy.

Actually, I was referring to the sectarian violence under Morsi's lack of control.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

They elected him and his party into power and now they find out he sucks, that's too bad. They should be stuck with him until the next election. If/when he loses and refuses to step down only then should the military do something.

 

autoworker autoworker's picture

Bec.De.Corbin wrote:

They elected him and his party into power and now they find out he sucks, that's too bad. They should be stuck with him until the next election. If/when he loses and refuses to step down only then should the military do something.

 

The only protests we've seen, in reaction to the military, has been from Morsi's supporters. Where are the other voices of objection?

NDPP

Egyptian Revolutionary Socialists Support US Backed Military Coup

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/07/16/rseg-j16.html

"As the army tightens its grip on Egypt, the reactionary implications of the July 3 coup are becoming ever more apparent. Pseudo-left groups who backed the coup... stand exposed as counter revolutionary organizations..."

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

autoworker wrote:
Bec.De.Corbin wrote:

They elected him and his party into power and now they find out he sucks, that's too bad. They should be stuck with him until the next election. If/when he loses and refuses to step down only then should the military do something.

 

The only protests we've seen, in reaction to the military, has been from Morsi's supporters. Where are the other voices of objection?

I'm just saying they elected him so they should be stuck with him till its time to vote him out. The military should be telling "the people" the same thing.

NDPP

Israel Reacts Positively to Egypt Coup

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/07/22/314947/israel-reacts-positively...

"Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has reacted positively to the recent military coup in Egypt that toppled the country's first freely elected President Mohamed Morsi.

Netanyahu, in rare remarks, said the fall of Morsi shows the weakness of political Islamic movements, Reuters reported on Sunday."

 

Egypt Army Steps Up Attacks on Gaza Tunnels After Morsi Ouster (and vid)

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/07/21/314931/egypt-army-ups-attacks-o...

"Palestinians in the Israeli blockaded Gaza Strip are in need of basic supplies as neighboring Egypt's military destroys more cross-border tunnels, Press TV reports.."

Egypt Army helps 'put Palestinians on a diet' and prepares them to be more receptive to upcoming 'negotiations' with Israel..

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

"The Jailers Should Be Jailed": Sharif Abdel Kouddous on the Embrace of Egypt’s Military Post-Morsi

http://www.democracynow.org/2013/7/16/the_jailers_should_be_jailed_sharif

NDPP

Egyptian Coup Leader Al-Sisi Threatens Mass Repression

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/07/26/egyp-j26.html

"...The MB-led anti-coup Pro-Democracy Alliance accused the military of issuing 'an explicit call for civil war".

 

 US Only Trusts Egypt's Army to Keep Stability: Analyst (and vid)

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/07/25/315454/us-trusts-egypts-army-to...

"Those of us who were in Algeria in the 90s remember what happened there when a vote was overturned by the military and it is very difficult not to think that may very well happen again in Egypt with severe consequences for the whole region.." Interview with ME expert Christopher Walker in London.

 

Prosecutor Orders Ousted Egypt President Morsi's Arrest Over Hamas Links (and vid)

http://rt.com/news/egypt-morsi-detained-hamas-624/

"Morsi has been held in an unknown location since he was removed from office on July 3 by the military."

NDPP

At Least 80 Dead, over 700 Injured in Egypt Clashes - Health Ministry (photos, vid)

http://rt.com/news/egypt-dead-clashes-brotherhood-664/

 

Israeli Ambassador Calls Al-Sisi a 'National Hero For All Jews'

http://middleeastmonitor.com/news/middle-east/6617-israeli-ambassador-ca...

"...According to Israeli Radio, the ambassador...said, 'Al Sisi is not a national hero for Egypt, but for all Jews in Israel and around the globe."

NDPP

Cairo Killings Product of Conspiracy: Shakar Rizk (and vid)

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/07/28/315956/cairo-killings-product-o...

"...What I saw on the ground this morning was a real catastrophe that happened on the Egyptian earth. It is a coup that is controlling the country."

NDPP

Egypt Army Launching Counter-Extremist Operation in Sinai (and vid)

http://rt.com/news/egypt-army-sinai-operation-681/

"Egypt's military forces have started a massive operation against armed extremists in the northern Sinai Peninsula, reports in the Egyptian media say.

According to information published by the Egyptian Army, 'had the Morsi regime continued for a few more months...there would have been a declaration of an emirate of Northern Sinai...And that would be the equivalent of Waziristan in Pakistan, or Northern Mali..."

NDPP

Egypt Reconstitutes Mubarak's 'Atrocious' Secret Police

https://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/07/30-10

"Egypt's military-backed interim government announced Monday it is bringing back Egypt's infamous secret police units..

'It's a return to the Mubarak era,' Aida Seif-el-Dawla of the Nadeem Center for Rehabilitation of Victims of Violence and Torture told the Guardian.."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The Egyptian coup splits the Middle East

The Arab Spring continues to rage in Egypt, exposing conflicting interests at play

The military coup in Egypt has divided the Middle East and North Africa while creating bizarre new bedfellows. Supporting the coup are Syria and the conservative Gulf monarchies and pro-Western Jordan that have been preeminent in backing the anti-Syrian regime. Turkey and Tunisia have joined Iran in opposing it. While Israel, Libya, Yemen and Hamas in the Gaza Strip have withheld comment, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas has praised the Egyptian army for its action. Algeria urges Egyptians to reach consensus based on unity, national reconciliation and respect of the constitution. Evidently, scars were left by the decade-long civil war that consumed nearly 200,000 Algerian lives after the military junta cancelled a second round of elections in 1991 when the Islamic Salvation Front was poised to win a two-thirds majority in the parliament.

Since December 2010 the region has been in the throes of turmoil variously called the Arab Spring, Arab Awakening or Arab Revolutions - focused on giving citizens the right to choose their governments freely. The common aim has been to end autocracies, be they secular nationalist or monarchical...

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/opinion/The-Egyptian-coup-splits-the-Mid...

josh

From last week:

The Obama administration will tell lawmakers Thursday that it won’t declare Egypt’s government overthrow a coup, U.S. officials said, allowing the United States to continue providing $1.5 billion in annual military and economic aid to the Arab world’s most populous country.

William Burns, the State Department’s No. 2 official, will hold closed-doors briefings with members of the House and Senate just a day after Washington delayed delivery of four F-16 fighter jets to Egypt. It was the first U.S. action since the military ousted Mohammed Morsi as president, imprisoned him and other Muslim Brotherhood members and suspended the constitution earlier this month.

The administration has been forced into difficult contortions to justify not declaring a coup d’etat, which would prompt the automatic suspension of American assistance programs under U.S. law. Washington fears that halting such funding could imperil programs that help to secure Israel’s border and fight weapons smuggling into the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, among other things seen as critical to U.S. national security.

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/obama-administration-plans-to-say-it-does-not-consider-morsis-ouster-a-coup.php

NDPP

Egypt: Coups Modern and Postmodern  -  by Eric Walberg

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/08/05/317296/egypt-coups-modern-and-p...

"Already the early enthusiasm for Egypt's 3 July coup is waning..."

NDPP

West, Allies Targeting Islamic Political Groups  -  by Catherine Shakdam

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/08/05/317245/west-targeting-islamic-p...

"...In a matter of months, Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood went from being the country's ruling party with not only a ruling president but a parliamentary majority, something that even deposed President Hosni Mubarak could never achieve, to a renegade faction the media are portraying as an amalgam of religious fanatics with criminal tendancies..."

NDPP

Israeli Drone Bombs Egypt

http://www.roitov.com/articles/sinaidrone.htm

"Was this a casus belli event? Can Egypt declare war on Israel following the latter's aggression of Egyptian citizens on Egyptian land?

The AP news agency quoted two senior Egyptian defence sources claiming that the Israeli airstrike had been coordinated with the Egyptian authorities.

AP's report and the ongoing reactions within Egypt show that this is not a casus belli. Israel and the military dictatorship in Egypt have declared war on the Egyptian people."

NDPP

Gazans Suffer As Result of Imposed Restrictions by Egypt (and vid)

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/08/12/318293/gazans-suffer-as-result-...

"..Immediately after the ouster of Egyptian president Mohammad Morsi, the number of people allowed to leave Gaza dropped to less than a hundred a day. Now both Israel and the Egyptian military are violating the rights of Palestinians.."

NDPP

'War Zone': Scores Killed in Egypt Violence (and vid)

http://rt.com/news/egypt-police-disperse-protesters-471/

"State of emergency proclaimed..."

 

2,200 Killed in Security Forces' Crackdown on Cairo Sit-Ins: Muslim Brotherhood (and vid)

http://www.presstv.com/detail/2013/08/14/318628/50-killed-in-cairo-clash...

Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood says at least 2,200 people have been killed and 10,000 others injured in the crackdown by the Egyptian security forces on protest sit-ins..."

Unionist

The Guardian is [url=http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/14/egypt-clear-cairo-sitins-li... the horrendous events in Egypt as the military putschists murder peaceful protestors.

Interesting to see that "Vice-President" Mohammed El-Baradei, the cowardly opportunist who grabbed the coat-tails of the military when he couldn't get into power by democratic elections, has now apparently resigned. Turns out he can't stand the sight of blood. Should have thought of that before.

ETA: How could I have forgotten to mention that El Baradei is a Nobel laureate? My bad.

 

Unionist

Quote:

The 17-year-old daughter of Muslim Brotherhood politician Mohamed El Beltagy was among those killed in Cairo today, El Beltagy has confirmed.

Asmaa was shot at the larger encampment at Rabaa Al-Adawiya. Her brother, Ammar, also confirmed her death on his Twitter account.

"I do not send condolences to martyrs, including my daughter. These are brides and grooms who offered their souls for the sake of this country," El Beltagy said in remarks quoted by the pro-Brotherhood middle east monitor website.

[url=http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/14/egypt-clear-cairo-sitins-li... Guardian live blog.[/url]

 

Unionist

[url=http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/14/cairo-doctors-morsi-hospita... doctors struggle to treat Morsi supporters during bloody crackdown[/url]

• At least 278 dead as pro-Morsi camps stormed
• Bulldozers and live ammunition used in raids
• Doctor tells of 'barbaric' scenes at field hospital

NDPP

State of Emergency Declared in Egypt To Foil NATO-Backed Subversion

http://nsnbc.me/2013/08/14/state-of-emergency-declared-in-egypt-to-foil-...

"After the coup by abuse of democratic institutions has failed, Egypt is ripe for the Syrian model..."

NDPP

Unionist wrote:

The Guardian is [url=http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/14/egypt-clear-cairo-sitins-li... the horrendous events in Egypt as the military putschists murder peaceful protestors.

Interesting to see that "Vice-President" Mohammed El-Baradei, the cowardly opportunist who grabbed the coat-tails of the military when he couldn't get into power by democratic elections, has now apparently resigned. Turns out he can't stand the sight of blood. Should have thought of that before.

ETA: How could I have forgotten to mention that El Baradei is a Nobel laureate? My bad.

 

He also sits with other high level sellouts  on George Soros' International Crisis Group (ICG) and I suspect he's only repositioning himself to further exploit political possibilities later...

josh

In my view Morsi and the Brotherhood leadership bear a good deal of the blame for derailing the transition, since a democratic transition is a pact among various political forces, and he broke the pact. If Morsi was what democracy looked like, many Egyptians did not want it. Gallup polls trace this disillusionment.

But the Egyptian military bears the other part of the blame for the failed transition. Ambitious officers such as Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, Morsi’s Minister of Defense, were secretly determined to undo Morsi’s victory at the polls. They said they wanted him to compromise with his political rivals, but it seems to me they wanted more, they wanted him neutered. When the revolutionary youth and the workers and even many peasants staged the June 30 demonstrations, al-Sisi took advantage of them to stage a coup.

http://www.juancole.com/2013/08/transition-military-dictatorship.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+juancole%2Fymbn+%28Informed+Comment%29

Unionist

josh (quoting Juan Cole) wrote:

In my view Morsi and the Brotherhood leadership bear a good deal of the blame for derailing the transition, since a democratic transition is a pact among various political forces, and he broke the pact. If Morsi was what democracy looked like, many Egyptians did not want it. Gallup polls trace this disillusionment.

At a time when Juan Cole's government continues to shove billions of dollars up the backside of the murderous Egyptian military, I'm not entirely sure why it's important to cite his gratuitous insults against the democratically elected government of Egypt. If memory serves, Cole supported U.S. aggression against Afghanistan and Libya. I'm not surprised that he would be piling on against Morsi, at a time when the people of Egypt need to be left alone to defend their revolution.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Massacre in Cairo: Egypt on Brink After Worst Violence Since 2011 Revolution (video)


At least 525 people were killed in Egypt on Wednesday when security forces cracked down on two protest camps filled with supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi. The Muslim Brotherhood says the actual death toll tops 2,000 and has called new rallies for today. The Egyptian military has defended the crackdown and declared a state of emergency. We’re joined by three guests: in Cairo, Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous, who covered Wednesday’s violence and visited the makeshift field clinics overrun with the dead and wounded, and Lina Attalah, chief editor and co-founder of the Cairo-based news website, Mada Masr.

http://www.democracynow.org/2013/8/15/massacre_in_cairo_egypt_on_brink

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NDPP

Bloody Reckoning: Crisis-Torn Egypt's Future on a Knife Edge After Crackdown on Islamists (and vid)

http://rt.com/news/egypt-bloodshed-condemnation-future-519/

"The Egyptian military's crackdown on supporters of ex-President Mohamed Morsi has plunged the world's most populous Arab nation into its worst violence for decades. The country is teetering between a return to Mubarak-era autocracy and civil war.

The military's apparent wish to return to Mubarak-style rule indicates that the generals have failed to appreciate the changes in Egyptian society that have occurred since the ousting of the long-time leader in 2011...

The strain in [US-Egypt] relations was clear in the most recent US attempt to mediate in the ongoing crisis, when Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham last week pleaded with the Egyptian military to reinstate Morsi..."

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So Much for Mideast Democracy - by Eric Margolis

http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/07/eric-margolis/so-much-for-mideast-dem...

"The real story behind the military coup in Cairo led by General al-Sissi is much more complex than the western media is reporting. The counter-revolution of Egypt's 'deep government' was financed and aided by the US and Saudi Arabia, cheered on by Israel, the UAE, Britain and France. Tiny Qatar, that backed Morsi with $8 billion, lost its influence in Cairo. The Saudis will now call many shots in Egypt.

The overthrow of a moderate Islamist government will send a message to the Muslim world that compromise with the Western powers is impossible and only violent resistance can shake the status quo."

NDPP

John Baird Calls For Calm as Tensions in Egypt Escalate

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/john-baird-calls-for-calm-as-tensions-in-...

"Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird also issued a statement; expressing deep concern over the violence and calling on Egypt to implement much needed changes to ease tensions. 'We urge both parties to avoid violence, and engage in a meaningful political dialogue for the good of all Egytians.."

 

'Bloodbath That is Not a Bloodbath:' Why Egypt is Doomed  -  by Pepe Escobar

http://rt.com/op-edge/egypt-protests-terror-muslim-brotherhood-526/

"There's no other way of saying it; from Washington's point of view, Arabs can kill each other to Kingdom Come, be it Sunnis against Shiites, jihadis against secularists, peasants against urbanites, and Egyptians against Egyptians. The only thing that matters is the Camp David agreements: and nobody is allowed to delegitimize Israel.

Internationally, the big winners are Saudi Arabia (displacing Qatar), Israel (because the Egyptian army is even more docile than the Brotherhood, and --who else--the Pentagon, the Egyptian army's pimp. Nowhere in the Milky Way is this House of Saud/ spin as 'good for the Egyptian people.'

 

 

NDPP

Obama and the Egyptian Massacre

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2013/08/16/pers-a16.html

"Washington apparently failed to fully foresee the implications of allowing the military and its supporters in the liberal bourgeoisie to settle accounts with the MB. It now fears that with the latest massacre, the army has overreached itself, irretrievably destabilizing Egypt and undermining US Middle East policy.

The massacre of protesters in Cairo confirms again that US policy is not set by moral abstractions, but by a ruthless calculation of US imperialism's geopolitical interests. Various 'human rights' arguments served to manipulate public opinions and with the assistance of a corrupt media establishment, secure the support of layers of the middle class for imperialist policies..."

kropotkin1951

CTV News wrote:

John Baird Calls For Calm as Tensions in Egypt Escalate

Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird also issued a statement;

Canada supports "a transparent democratic system that respects the voices of its citizens, and that encourages and respects civil society and all other segments of the population," the statement said.

 

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