Cuban Prison Hunger Striker Orlando Zapata Tamayo Dies

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sanizadeh

Fidel wrote:

I was referring to the essay on this very subject concerning the 75 Cuban dissidents and written by a well known U.S. dissident and former CIA specialist on Latin America, Philip Agee, and quoted in several posts above.

Thanks, I read that, but Agee's piece was also very vague, merely stating that "every one of the 75 dissidents arrested and convicted was knowingly a participant in US government operations to overthrow the government". Do you know what specifically this person whad done for which he had been sentenced?

Unionist

Sanizadeh, if you're so interested in the juridical details, why don't you research the matter and get back to us with the answers? Who is it that you would like to provide you with this information?

sanizadeh

Sure. because Fidel was speaking with authority on the subject, I thought he might already have the details. I'll double check and let you know.

 

Unionist

[editorial note] If NDPP is reading this thread, could you please scroll up and fix up your post #14? It screwed up the entire balance of the thread. Thanks. And kropotkin, please check your post #52.  [ /end note]

Snert Snert's picture

Quote:
He was not convicted of letter writing he was convicted of Disrespecting the Government.  In Canada it is called Contempt of Court and is virtually the same crime.

 

Except that we maintain a separation between the Judicial branch and the government. Would you (and I'm actually asking) support the prosecution of a Canadian for disrespecting Stephen Harper's government? Like, if Stevie said "Stop criticizing me for prorogueing" and someone refused to? I would find that chilling. And we'd all find this place nearly empty.

 

Quote:
And what do you think our prison officials response would be to aboriginal protesters who want to be treated differently in our jails because they were arrested for refusing to stop protesting the theft of their lands and resources by multi-national corporations.

 

To build Healing Lodges, support special spirituality and community based programs for Aboriginals, and other similar different treatment that we actually already do?

 

Quote:
you only seem to have a problem when the protests are protesting to bring about a regime change you want.

 

Actually, no.

 

I couldn't care less about the political opinions of others. I care about their actions. When I "have a problem" with a protest, it's not because I don't want people to believe what they believe, it will be because of what they've done in order to convince others. And I really don't mind if the law takes the same approach. I'm not the thought police, and I don't want the government to be the thought police either. Action police I'm OK with.

 

 

 

NDPP

Fidel said:

" The "dissidents" knew they were breaking Cuban laws and were caught, and now they are paying the price."

NDPP here's the 'price'. You can tell a lot about a country by how it treats its political prisoners.

Amnesty Prisoner of Conscience Orlando Zapata Tamayo 'Unrecognisable' after 85 Day Fast Over Beatings

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/feb/24/cuba-political-hungerstriker...

"He stopped eating solid food on December 3 to protest against what he said were repeated beatings by guards and other abuses at Kilo 7 Prison in the eastern province of Comaguey. His back was 'tattooed with blows' from beatings according to his mother. Two weeks ago she reported he was 'skin and bones, his stomach is just a hole' and that bed sores covered his legs. He was so gaunt nurses were unable to get intravenous lines for fluids into his arms and used veins on his neck instead..."

 

kropotkin1951

He was not convicted of letter writing he was convicted of Disrespecting the Government.  In Canada it is called Contempt of Court and is virtually the same crime.  Note that the only mens rea required is that you know you have been told to stop and you openly defy the court.  Also of interest is the fact that writing letters if they bring the courts into disrepute is also a crime in Canada.

And what do you think our prison officials response would be to aboriginal protesters who want to be treated differently in our jails because they were arrested for refusing to stop protesting the theft of their lands and resources by multi-national corporations.

You don't like the Cuban system so you presume it is illegitimate but in Canada where we have at least as many restrictions on our rights you accept that as justifiable to enhance peace order and good government.  

I personally don't like either the Canadian or the Cuban method of dealing with dissidents but you only seem to have a problem when the protests are protesting to bring about a regime change you want.

Quote:

 

An intent to bring a court or judge into contempt is not an essential element of the offence of contempt of court. That was decided in R. v. Hill (1976), 73 D.L.R. (3d) 621 (B.C.C.A.). McIntyre J.A., speaking for a unanimous court said at p. 629:

Even, however, if the cases could not be distinguished on their facts, it is my opinion that an intent to bring a Court or Judge into contempt is not an essential ingredient of this office. In Canada the proposition stated in R. v. Gray, [1900] 2 Q.B. 36 at p. 40, by Lord Russell of Killowen has been accepted. He said:

Any act done of writing published calculated to bring a Court or a judge of the Court into contempt, or to lower his authority, is a contempt of Court. That is one class of contempt. Further, any act done or writing published calculated to obstruct or interfere with the due course of justice or the lawful process of the Courts is a contempt of Court.

These words have received the approval of the Supreme Court of Canada in Poje et al v. A-G. B.C. (1953), 105 C.C.C. 311 and in Re Duncan (1957), 11 D.L.R. (2d) 616. In my view, they express the law as it now stands in this country.

The word "calculated  as used here is not synonymous with the word "intended". The meaning it bears in this context is found in the Shorter Oxford English dictionary as fitted, suited, apt.....

[28]   As to the mens rea of the crime of criminal intent, the law was neatly summed up by Hill J. in R. v. Peel Regional Police Service where at page 17 he stated:

The mens rea of the crime of criminal contempt, the intention or mental state of the alleged contemner, may be wilfull or knowing behaviour or reckless disregard or indifference that the conduct at hand would tend to undermine the authority of the court: United Nurses of Alberta v. Attorney-General of Alberta (1992) 71 C.C.C. (3d) 225... As stated by McLachlin J. at 253 of the United Nurses of Alberta decision:

Therefore, when it is clear the accused must have known his or her act of defiance will be public, it may be inferred that he or she was at least reckless as to whether the authority of the court would be brought into contempt.  

Quote:

http://www.theinquiry.ca/Contempt.hide.php

 

 

Quote:

Zapata jailed since March 2003, had gone on a hunger strike to protest against prison conditions which denied him the choice of wearing white dissident clothes instead of prison uniform. 

kropotkin1951

Snert you don't like Cuba and apparently you don't want or need to know anything about their judicial system before you presume somehow it is less independent than ours.  Why is it you think they don't have any more independent judges than Canada does?  You realize of course that our government directly appoints judges and they are often political allies.

But you have no problem with our government locking up FN's leaders because they dispute the right of the government to do what it wants with their lands and resources.  They were peaceful they just refused to stop protesting when the court said stand aside and let the mining companies mine explore and mine for uranium.  So what rights do they have?  Did they get to vote for the government that stole their land and resources?

I condemn both Canada and Cuba for their human rights abuses against protesters you only condemn Cuba that says everything about your committment to people's struggles against unjust laws and governments.

NDPP

j.m. wrote:

As for Fidel "Just Doin' It", I wonder how aware he is of what he is wearing given his current health. Can anyone confirm or provide insight into this?

NDPP

Lula says in the following piece that Fidel's sharp as a tack so presumably his fancy NIKE threads are his own stylin consumer choice. And since the Cuban leadership also gets a nice piece of this capitalist action perhaps it's good for business besides. The first article records Lula's assessment of Fidel and the last -  the profitable relationship between Cuba and multinational corporations doing business there:

Lula's Silence on Death of Cuban Dissident Provokes Criticism:

http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/311346,lulas-silence-on-death-of...

"When it deals with countries that it is friendly with, as is the case with Cuba, Brazil says nothing, even if there are evident human rights violations. When the case involves countries with whom it is not so friendly, Brazil is capable of being quite strident. Cuban dissident Manuel Cuesta said 'Lula should have complained. We are talking about universal values, which the Lula government defends very well.."

Prisoner Death a Setback in Cuba - US Relations

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE61P53420100226

"Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, [Spain] a socialist and long time advocate of close ties with Havana, lamented Zapatero's death and demanded that Cuba free political prisoners and respect human rights. "That is a fundamental demand of the entire international community,' he said in the Spanish Parliament. Cuba watchers said the dissident's death was a setback for the Cuban government's diplomatic efforts to bring pressure to bear on the US to drop the embargo..."

Re; the Swooshification of Fidel

Branding Cuba: La Vida Nike

http://www.alternet.org/story/13135/branding_cuba:_la_vida_nike/

"Cuba is once again open for business and courting capitalist investment on its own terms. The government remains a 51% partner in most major enterprises on the island. Investors are happy with these terms since they are basically investing in an island wide monopoly...And with the capitalists back in town come the billboards as Cuba is once again adorned with multinational corporate 'art' touting a consumerist message..

The swoosh is property. It's a brand. In Cuba it's currently controlled by a Spanish corporation Cidesport S.A... For a small minority, the nuevo riche, Cubans who receive money from abroad or who work in the tourist industry and receive tips in US dollars, Cuba's new preferred currency, NIKE products are now available...They cost considerably more than other comparable Chinese or Vietnamese products, with the markup split between Cidesport and NIKE. Nike produces nothing. They simply own the swoosh. Cuba, with a population of 11 million, presents both a market and virgin territory for branding..

The US State Department, while rhetorically committed to its arcane embargo, also recognizes the potential of the Cuban market. Under pressure from US based corporations, it has been punching big business friendly loopholes through its own regulations...

Staring in 1995, for example, the Clinton Administration allowed US corporations to spend money in Cuba registering trademarks with an eye towards securing a foothold in the Cuban market. To date brands such as Hard Rock Cafe, Nutrasweet, Heinz, Gillett, Sbarro, Clairol, Radisson, Coca Cola, Mcdonald's, Warner-Lambert, Calvin Klein, Playboy, Direc TV, Conagra, Zippo, MCI, Sara Lee, Monsanto, Pizza Hut, UPS and Wrigleys Gum have all stepped up to the plate,l registering their Cuban trademarks..."

'Socialism'...yeah right.

Fidel

Snert wrote:

Quote:
He was not convicted of letter writing he was convicted of Disrespecting the Government.  In Canada it is called Contempt of Court and is virtually the same crime.

 

Except that we maintain a separation between the Judicial branch and the government. Would you (and I'm actually asking) support the prosecution of a Canadian for disrespecting Stephen Harper's government? Like, if Stevie said "Stop criticizing me for prorogueing" and someone refused to? I would find that chilling. And we'd all find this place nearly empty.

Our 22 percent stooges in Ottawa fear not democracy. They know full well that an elaborate matrix of well-funded corporate-friendly newz media and Bay Street oligarchy are on side with the stoogeocracy. Canada's colonial administrativeship is well insulated from democratic and free market forces. In Cuba, all that stands between them and the way it was before 1959 are father figures of the revolution and basically what amounts to an idea that has withstood the test of time. Imperialists have tried to murder this idea around the world through cold war and continuing today. And they will never succeed in killing this high minded ideal for people's democracy - rule by the people, for the people and of the people.

Viva La Revolucion!

K.E. Smith

This may help things: www.therealcuba.com/

RosaL

K.E. Smith wrote:

This may help things: www.therealcuba.com/

You have opened my eyes. I particularly recommend the Glenn Beck video Wink 

A_J

RosaL wrote:
K.E. Smith wrote:
This may help things:
">www.therealcuba.com/

You have opened my eyes. I particularly recommend the Glenn Beck video Wink 

I can kind of excuse a little nuttiness amongst some of the Cuban exiles. "Those to whom evil is done do evil in return" and all that.

Generation Y however is a good blog about what's really going on in Cuba (and no, there's nothing even remotely like Glenn Beck there).