Egyptian Revolution III

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Catchfire Catchfire's picture
Egyptian Revolution III

Continued from here.

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Omar Suleiman and Canadian complicity in torture

Quote:
Ahmad El Maati's suit will go on, as will others, swimming against the current of wilful official evasion and censorship. In Canada and in Europe, claimants against governments guilty of complicity in heinous violations of human rights commonly fight with one hand tied behind their backs, given claims of state privilege and an induced climate of paranoia surrounding the "war on terror."

Somewhere in the testimony that Judge Iacobucci was not allowed to publish, however, there is almost certainly at least one statement from a CSIS agent or an official from DFAIT describing El Maati's ten-hour interview with a man who wanted to be seen - by Canadian officials on the other side of that glass, maybe the odd American as well - to be taking a full and fair history of El Maati's treatment in Syria and Egypt. That statement could confirm El Maati's educated guess that his interrogator was Omar Suleiman.

But Canadians cannot be allowed to see that statement, as they cannot see any testimony concerning US agencies like the CIA. The public admission that representatives of the government of Canada co-operated with Omar Suleiman in the interrogation of a Canadian citizen - without actively attempting to protect and repatriate him - could, after all, damage Canada's relations with the government of Hosni Mubarak.

Or that was, at least, the official excuse, as it remains a convincing argument to the Ontario Court of Appeal with any testimony about liaisons between Canadian and US authorities in the illegal detention and torture of a Canadian citizen.

Unionist

So the new military rulers, in record time, have sworn allegiance to the U.S. and Israel (through their gratuitous promise to "respect treaties"); moved against the demonstrators in Tahrir Square; and banned strikes.

If this is the road to democracy, I wish the travellers bon voyage.

 

NDPP

The Fall of Mubarak and the Bankruptcy of Western Empires  - by Rosal L Blanc

http://www.decolonialtranslation.com/english/the-fall-of-mubarak-and-the...

"After 3 decades of military and economic support for the Mubarak dictatorship, and of sending billions of dollars annually to sustain it, the first declarations of western leaders following the fall of Mubarak have been to sell us the idea that it was their 'liberal democratic principles' that have prevailed...Now the wolves disguise themselves as sheep.

The same leaders that up to a few days ago were trying to instill fear about 'political Islam' to justify support for the dictator Mubarak, today appear as if they were anti-Mubarakians all their lives.

Our task of solidarity in the first world does not consist of putting ourselves in a position to determine these debates in public opinion. Our task is to impede the imperialist/zionist maneuvers, hold our governments accountable and unconditional solidarity to the radical democratization and right to self-determination of the people of the Middle East.

Our chants to our imperialist governents:

Hands Off The Middle East! Down With The Zionist/Imperialist/Dictatorships! Support For Democratization In The Entire Middle East! Down With Zionist Colonialists In Palestine! If You Want To Democratize Begin By Democratizing Your Own Countries Without Interfering In The Third World!"

NDPP

Egyptian Army Hijacking Revolution Activists Fear

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/egypt

"Egypt's revolution is in danger of being hijacked by the army, key political activists have warned, as concrete details of the country's democratic transition period were revealed for the first time.."

NDPP

The Uprising in Egypt: Toward a Marxist Analysis

7:30 PM Thursday, Feb. 17, 290 Danforth Ave - Greek Canadian Democratic Hall, Toronto

(between Broadview and Chester TTC Stations)

Welcoming Remarks: Miguel Figueroa CPC

Main Speaker: Mohamed Fetaih, Egyptian National Association for Change

Caissa

Speculation is swirling over whether deposed Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak is ill, with some reports saying he's in a coma, some saying he's fine and others saying he's depressed.

Newspapers in Egypt and Saudi Arabia, citing anonymous sources close to the former president, have reported in the last couple of days that Mubarak is seriously ill and, according to some stories, may be in a coma.

Reuters said a military source told the agency Tuesday that Mubarak was "breathing" but would not be more specific.

But the agency also reported that a source close to Mubarak said the former president was taking phone calls at his resort in the Egyptian port city of Sharm-el-Sheikh.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2011/02/15/mubarak-ill-reports.html#ixzz1E7oOoZDL

Enduro Man Enduro Man's picture

Unionist wrote:

So the new military rulers, in record time, have sworn allegiance to the U.S. and Israel (through their gratuitous promise to "respect treaties"); moved against the demonstrators in Tahrir Square; and banned strikes.

If this is the road to democracy, I wish the travellers bon voyage.

 

Democracy in Egypt is unlikely in the near future.  The Army there controls the economy and the mass media.  The generals will never allow a civilian leader to wield real power in that country.  They've far too much to lose.

If there's going to be a revolution then Egyptians had better get cracking.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

[url=http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2011/majdian140211.html]A Glorified Military Coup in Egypt: An Aborted Revolution or the Genesis of a Genuine Revolution?[/url]

Quote:
The Egyptian military decided to oust a widely-resented dictator as it witnessed the growing threat of a potential revolution being born in Egyptian streets. Had it been allowed to continue for a few more days, the uprising could have grown into a full-fledged revolution which potentially could smash the Egyptian state. To save the state, the military took charge and overthrew the stubborn dictator. The dictator was thrown overboard in order to save the dictatorship.

But how can one explain the jubilation of Egyptian people if what took place in Egypt was in essence a military coup d'état? One straightforward answer seems to be that the majority of Egyptians think of the army as a national institution and a force for good. Perhaps they still see it as the army of Gamal Abdel Nasser. However, there is another possible explanation for equating a military coup with a revolution: Egyptians had lowered their expectation of what a genuine revolution could achieve to the mere act of ousting Mubarak. This in turn could be explained by thirty years of brutal rule that had destroyed organizational structures of opposition groups, jailing and eliminating potential leaders. The eighteen-day uprising in Egypt suffered from the absence of a strong and charismatic leadership. It also failed to produce one in the course of the events. The uprising also lacked broad and effective organizational forms.

 

Caissa

Egyptian pro-democracy leaders held a victory march on Friday to celebrate the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak's nearly 30-year rule one week ago.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2011/02/18/egypt-march.html#ixzz1EKEj9B4L

NDPP

Why Did Egyptians Succeed, Where Americans Fail?  -  by Eric Walberg

http://www.counterpunch.org/walberg02182011.html

"It seems that Egypt's suffering and oppression are something alien to Western experience. But this is far from the truth. As the fervour spread like wildfire during the first few weeks, I recalled how the leftist community in Toronto is just as self-righteous and eager for change, how neoliberalism has left Canadian society with yawning income disparities not much different than those of Egypt. but the very idea of such a spectacular event as happened here to address issues and social justice is impossible to imagine there or in the US.."

American Zionism Against the Egyptian Pro-Democracy Movement - by James Petras

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=23297

"One of the least analyzed aspects of the Egyptian pro-democracy movement and US policy toward it, is the role of the influential Zionist power configuration (ZPC). What is striking about Obama's twists and turns in policy toward the mass popular struggles in Egypt is how closely it repeats and implements the policy positions of the US Zionist power configurations clearly presented in the '52 organizations' propaganda organ The Daily Alert.."

NDPP

Egyptian Junta Clamps Down on Strikes - by Chris Marsden

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2011/feb2011/egyp-f23.shtml

"Egypt's mlitary regime has threatened to illegalise strikes in the face of the ongoing social unrest following the removal of President Hosni Mubarak. Alongside direct repression of the working class, the junta is working hard to co-opt the bourgeois and petty bourgeois 'opposition movements' in order to lend credibility to its claims of preparing a transition to democratic, civilian rule. The most damning indictment of those vying to be part of the putative democratic replacment for direct military rule is their readiness to discuss with the junta, even as it threatens more repression of the working class..."

NDPP

A Revolution Against Neoliberalism?  by 'Abu Atris'

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/opinion/2011/02/201122414315249621....

"If rebellion results in a retrenchment of neoliberalism, millions will feel cheated.."

NDPP

Egypt Protesters Dispersed by Force

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2011/02/2011226221957428.html

"Army uses batons to break up demonstrations in capital Cairo demanding purging of Mubarak loyalists from government. 'Military police used batons and tasers to hit the protesters', Ahmed Bahgat, one of the protesters, told the Reuters news agency by telephone. 'The military is once again using force. But the protesters have not responded.'

Protesters say they want the resignation of the government of Ahmed Shafiq, the current prime minister, the immediate release of political prisoners and the issuing of a general amnesty.

The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, the ruling military council, later apologized for the military's response and said the situation 'wasn't intentional'.."

Fidel

Well at least they don't have any illusions about trying to slide democracy in through the front door, like electing some wishy-washy Jack Layton type social democratic party or anything. Because that would take all the fun and excitement out of watching desperate people in far off countries getting their heads busted in the streets fighting a US-backed military dictatorship armed to the eye teeth.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

Egypt seizes Mubarak family funds

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110228/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_egypt

Quote:
Egypt's top prosecutor seized all the funds of ousted leader Hosni Mubarak and his family on Monday and banned them from travel abroad, the latest humiliation for the once-powerful family.

During the 18-day pro-democracy uprising, unconfirmed reports that Mubarak and his family might have amassed billions, or even tens of billions of dollars over their three decades in power fueled protesters already enraged over massive corruption and poverty in Egypt. Mubarak, the top ruling party leaders and other cronies, and the powerful military have all profited richly from the corrupt system.

Caissa

Egypt's military rulers say the prime minister appointed by ousted President Hosni Mubarak has resigned, meeting a key demand of the opposition protest movement.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2011/03/03/egypt.html

 

Caissa

Egypt's new Prime Minister, Essam Sharaf, has pledged to meet the demands for democratic change sought by protesters, and to resign if he fails.

He made the comments in an address before thousands gathered at Cairo's Tahrir Square before Friday prayers.

The former transport minister told the crowds that he drew his "will and determination" from the people.

Mr Sharaf replaced Ahmed Shafiq, who was appointed in the dying days of the regime of Hosni Mubarak.

He was named as head of the transitional caretaker government by the army on Thursday.

On Friday, it was announced that a referendum on constitutional reform in the country would be held on 19 March. Elections for parliament and to choose a new president are scheduled within six months.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12650638

NDPP

The Middle East Feminist Revolution  - by Naomi Wolf

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/opinion/2011/03/201134111445686926....

"The role of women in the great upheaal in the Middle East has been woefully under-analysed. Women in Egypt did not just 'join' the protests - they were a leading force behind the cultural evolution that made the protests inevitable. And what is true for Egypt is true to a greater or lesser extent, throughout the Arab world. When women change, everything changes - and women in the Muslim world are changing radically.."

NDPP

Roots Of The Arab Revolts and Premature Celebrations  - by James Petras

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article27617.htm

"The very socio-economic structures and political conditions which detonated the pro-democracy mass movements, the unemployed and underemployed youth organized from 'the street', now present the greatest challenge: can the amorphous and diverse mass become an organized social and political force which can take state power, democratize the regime and, at the same time, create a new productive economy to provide stable well paying employment,  so far lacking in the rentier economy? The political outcome to date is indeterminable, democrats and socialists compete with clerical, monarchist and neoliberal forces backed by the US..."

NDPP

When Egypt's Revolution Was at the Crossroads  - by Esam al-Amin

http://www.counterpunch.org/amin03092011.html

"Here are 12 decisive moments that played a crucial role in maintaining the momentum of the revolution, ultimately changing the history of the region and the world.."

 

NDPP

Egypt: Peering Into the Revolution's Crystal Ball  - by Eric Walberg

http://www.opednews.com/articles/Egypt-Peering-into-the-re-by-Eric-Walbe...

"the burning question today is: will the US-imposed neoliberal order survive in Egypt?...

Will Egypt be the next Venezuela?"

NDPP

'Egypt Now Much Same As Mubarak Era' (and vid)

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/169836.html

"What happened is that you have gotten rid of a symbol, Hosni Mubarak. Nothing else has changed really.."

NDPP

Egyptian Workers Face US Backed Counter-Revolution

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2011/mar2011/pers-m25.shtml

"The promulgations this week in Egypt of a decree banning strikes and protests has laid bare the real character of the military controlled regime that succeeded the US backed dictator Hosni Mubarak. In the past few weeks, the counterrevolutionary aims and methods of the regime headed by Field Marshal Tantawi have become ever more open..."

NDPP

El Baradei: Soros's Man in Cairo  - by Maidhc O Cathail

http://dissidentvoice.org/2011/02/elbaradei-soros's-man-in-cairo/

"...'I hope President Obama will expeditiously support the people of Egypt,' Soros wrote in his Post ope-ed. 'My foundations are prepared to contribute what they can.' If the Egyptian people have as much sense as they have courage and determination, however, they will tell this self described 'committed advocate of democracy and open society' what to do with his 'philanthropy' and his Nobel laureate..."

Fidel

Most of the panelists on Steve Paikin's [url=http://www.tvo.org/cfmx/tvoorg/theagenda/index.cfm?page_id=7&bpn=779991&... Debate: Middle East Expectations[/url] tended to agree that in each of the countries there is much poverty and corruption in spite of the leaders of Syria, Bahrain, Tunisia, Egypt etc promising to reform and democratize institutions in those countries years ago.

They mentioned high unemployment rates across millions of youth and young people in those countries. Thabit Abdullah and Mohammad Fadel both said that "socialistic" policies for wealth redistribution are what's needed to lift from poverty millions living on $2 dollars or less per day.

One of the panelists touched off some controversy when he mentioned that post-communist societies in Eastern Europe, for example, have failed for the most part to deliver on promises of jobs and poverty reduction. In many cases the poverty has only increased after the switch to western style democracy.

NDPP

Egypt Revolt At The Centre Of Wide Social Chaos

http://libcom.org/news/egypt-revolt-center-wide-social-chaos-30032011

"[Just] as all ancient and recent geopolitical schemes designate this area as crucial, also the governments and the military staff of the major imperialist countries give the same importance to it..."

al-Qa'bong

Quote:
For Charles Krauthammer, a popular conservative columnist and one of the chief theorists of democracy promotion, the current upheavals have been all about Bush. "Everyone," Krauthammer insisted on March 4, "is a convert to George W. Bush's freedom agenda" now.

If this is true, then it behooves us to ask what Krauthammer defines as the 'freedom agenda'. It turns out that, according to Krauthammer (all that talk about 'regime change' from 2002 to 2003 notwithstanding), the chief principle of the 'freedom agenda' can be reduced á la Abrams to the rather pedestrian insight that "Arabs are no exception to the universal thirst for dignity and freedom".

But Krauthammer does not stop there and advances quickly from the banal to the absurd. Apparently, in Krauthammer's words, "the Bush Doctrine set the premise" for the current revolutions, upsetting age old structures of power in the Arab world. Really? Did the Arab public truly require Bush's imprimatur on democracy before they rose up to demand greater justice and freedom with the tools provided by democratic discourses?

What US conservatives never saw coming

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vaudree

Someone put an anti-Egyptian Military song on line. Someone tagged it. Whether you agree or disagree with it, it shouldn't have been tagged.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-rIKrX0_W4&skipcontrinter=1

You don't care much for a stranger's touch
But you can't hold your man and you can't hold much
And when it comes down to the end
You can't tell your enemies from your friends
But ain't it better than being alone, ain't it better than being alone

... no

Who knows who is friend or foe right now
Thus, one is loyal to ideals - that certain actions are wrong no matter who does them. If torture is wrong, then it is wrong not matter who is tortured. If kangaroo court Military trials are wrong for your friends, they are wrong for your foes also.

 

Unionist

[url=http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-egypt-crackdown-2011... army crackdown on Cairo protesters shocks Egyptians[/url]

Quote:
In a predawn raid Saturday that stunned the nation, Egyptian soldiers stormed Tahrir Square to disperse about 2,000 protesters angry at the ruling military council for failing to deliver democracy and bring corrupt officials to justice after the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.

The capital's central square, a scene of celebration two months ago when Mubarak fell from power, became a surprise battlefield as soldiers beat protesters and tore down tents. One demonstrator was shot dead and 71 others were injured. The military said its troops fired only blanks, but protesters said the air was peppered with live ammunition.

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

Here is footage from the massacre.  Not only did a number of people die that night they also hauled off the soldiers seen at the beginning of the footage for a fate to terrible for me to imagine.

So when is NATO going to liberate Egypt. I expect that our parties will all invoke the D2P since the government is murdering peaceful demonstrators in the streets. How much more can we stand before we intervene?

 

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&I...

NDPP

Egypt's Islamists: The Big Bad Wolf  -  by Eric Walberg

http://dissidentvoice.org/2011/04/egypts-islamists-the-big-bad-wolf/

"...This comparison between the communists and the Islamists is perhaps startling, but these two forces must be recognised as the main protagonists against the imperialists during the past century...The West has used and no doubt will continue to try to use Islamists when convenient to promote its imperial agenda. That it frowns on Egypt's MB today is a good sign.."

NDPP

US Groups Helped Nurture Arab Risings  -  by Ron Nixon

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/15/world/15aid.html

"A number of groups and individuals, directly involved in the revolts and reforms sweeping the region, including the April 6, Youth Movement in Egypt, received training and financing from groups like the International Republican Institute, the National Democratic Institute, and Freedom House, a nonprofit human rights organization based in Washington..

According to one diplomatic cable, leaders of the April 6 Youth Movement in Egypt told the American Embassy in 2009 that some members of the group had accused Ahmed Maher, a leader of the January uprising and other leaders of 'treason' in a mock trial related to their association with Freedom House which more militant members of the movement described as a 'Zionist organization.'

A later cable shows that the group ousted the members who were complaining..."

NDPP

Egypt's Revolution And The US: Mubarak's Fatal Error  -  by Eric Walberg

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=24428

"...leading politicians and businessmen are being driven to court in their Mercedes and driven away in a Black Maria.."

Northern Shoveler Northern Shoveler's picture

NDPP wrote:

Egypt's Revolution And The US: Mubarak's Fatal Error  -  by Eric Walberg

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=24428

"...leading politicians and businessmen are being driven to court in their Mercedes and driven away in a Black Maria.."

Thanks it is always nice getting perspectives from people actually in Cairo.

Quote:

Mubarak's fatal error was to ignore the highly sophisticated nature of US politics, where graft and violence are arts carefully honed over many years of electoral slugging matches. It is this sophistication that Egypt lacks, not any innate sense of real democracy, in the sense of respect for others and acknowledgment by rulers of their responsibility to their subjects. It turns out that the so-called undemocratic Egyptian political system, and the supposedly unsophisticated Egyptian people, are in fact light-years ahead of Americans in their political savvy, their sense of moral outrage, their courage in facing down evil and putting a stop to it.

Caissa

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak could be executed if he is convicted of ordering the killing of protesters, Egypt's justice minister says.

"One of the charges he is facing is complicity in the killing of martyrs and issuing the orders for premeditated the killing of those people," said Justice Minister Mohamed Abdelaziz al-Juindy. "This is a charge with a harsh punishment -- the death penalty."

In his first television interview since taking office, the new justice minister said last week that Egyptian courts would not shy away from sentencing Mubarak to death if he is found guilty.

"If the crime is proven, then the court will not hesitate to issue the death sentence," he said.

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/meast/05/04/egypt.mubarak.justice/inde...

NDPP

Poll: Egyptians Want Islamic Rule

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/179413.html

"...A recent survey has found that a majority of Eyptians will back an Islamic democratic system in the North African country.."

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

Comrades from Egypt yesterday sent me tons of pictures and links about the Palestinian theme from yesterday's massive demonstrations all over Egypt.  Here is one person kissing this slogan which says:  "Against the will of America and Israel, Jerusalem is ours and Palestine is Arab."

 

Angry Arab

 

 

 

Quote:

"Thousands of Egyptians took to the streets on Friday to push their military rulers to do more to help Palestinians following the overthrow of the country's president Hosni Mubarak.  Many Egyptians felt Mubarak, a U.S. ally, was too soft on Israel and want their new government to take a much stronger pro-Palestinian stand.  The gatherings in Cairo, Alexandria and El-Arish come amidst preparations by activists to organize a march to the Gaza Strip on Sunday, May 15 -- which Palestinians mark as the anniversary of their 1948 displacement following the establishment of Israel.

  

Buckets of tears from Zionists to Mubarak

 

Caissa

The wife of deposed Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has turned over her property and funds to the state, a move designed to settle the corruption allegations against her, officials and lawyers say.

Mubarak and his wife, Suzanne, have been questioned about their financial dealings. Some estimates put Mubarak's holdings in the tens of billions of dollars.

The prosecution of former regime officials, including the Mubaraks, has been one of the main demands by the activists who led the uprising that forced Mubarak to step down on Feb.11

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2011/05/16/mubarak-wife-assets.html

NDPP

Ex-Egypt Spy Chief Suleiman Missing (and vid)

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/181816.html

"The former Egyptian intelligence chief, Omar Suleiman, who faces numerous lawsuits in the North African country, has gone missing following the ouster of ex-President Hosni Mubarak..."

Caissa

Egypt's decision to end its blockade of Gaza by opening the only crossing to the Hamas-ruled Palestinian territory this weekend could ease the isolation of 1.4 million Palestinians there. It also puts the new Egyptian regime at odds with Israel, which insists on careful monitoring of people and goods entering Gaza for security reasons.

The Rafah crossing will be open permanently starting Saturday, Egypt's official Middle East News Agency announced. That would provide Gaza Palestinians their first open border to the world in four years, since Egypt and Israel slammed their crossings shut after the Islamic militant Hamas overran the Gaza Strip in 2007.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2011/05/26/egypt-gaza-border-crossing...

al-Qa'bong

In an article that generally seems favourable to the cause of Palestinian rights, I found the following passage rather strange:

Quote:

There was a slogan on the streets of Seattle: "This is what democracy looks like." You can't love democracy and denigrate protest, because protest is part of democracy. It's a package deal.

Likewise, you can't claim solidarity with Egyptian protesters when they take down a dictator, but act horrified that the resulting government in Egypt, more accountable to Egyptian public opinion, is more engaged in supporting Palestinian rights. It's a package deal.

 

 

Egypt Opens Rafah Crossing: This Is What Democracy Looks Like

 

Why would anyone who supports greater political and social rights in Egypt be opposed to Palestinians having the same rights? Am I missing something here?

NDPP

Israeli Deputy FM Secretly Visits Egypt

http://www.voltairenet.org/Israeli-deputy-FM-secretly-visits

"Israeli Deputy Foreign Minister Daniel Ayalon has secretly visited Egypt and met with top officials from the ruling military council, a report says. The vist, which took place two weeks ago, is the first time an Israeli official has visited Egypt since the country's former President Hosni Mubarak was toppled in February.

[The] Unity deal between Palestinian factions Hamas and Fatah, the re-opening of the Rafah crossing, and gas deals between the two sides were among their discussions. Following the visit, the Rafah border crossing was closed and Egypt resumed exporting natural gas to Israel at artificially low prices.."

notaradical

After opening the Rafah Crossing, Egypt severely curtailed the influx of Palestinian travellers on June 4. As of June 22, the border admits only 300 Palestinians per day.

It seems as though the interim government and the military junta are at odds. The former vowed to open the crossings and the latter is flexing its muscle by closing it again.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

A [url=http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/jesse/2011/06/egyptian-revolution-phase-... rabble blog post[/url] by Jesse McLaren on the origins and development of the Egyptian Spring is a refreshing change from the conspiracy theories that would have us believe the whole dictator-toppling idea was cooked up in Washington.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

 

Egypt needs to open a cargo crossing (Apparently Israel controls all the cargo crossings into Gaza) so food stuffs, consumer goods and medical supplies not allowed by those crazy Israeli restrictions can pass freely through into Gaza. That's as important if not more so than people passing through.

al-Qa'bong

Quote:
...Bishara continues to describe the revolution as a "great event" and "historical". "Very few revolutions in history were more organised than the Egyptian revolution," he said. "The genius of the Egyptian revolution was that the people could have dispersed on 25 January, but they continued and realised that this is bigger than a 'Day of Anger' (on 28 January); that they have something in their hands they can't let go of." Suddenly, they "held their destiny in their hands and they heard the wings of history flapping. There can be no turning back."

The Egyptian people's participation in the revolution, he said, exceeds any other revolution in history where participation is almost always only one per cent, with the exception of the 1979 Iranian Revolution where seven per cent of the population took to the streets. In Egypt and Tunisia (which began the season of Arab revolutions when it ousted its president on 15 January), a massive "unit" which is "the people" moved and dreamed as one. "It's such a major progress in the history of mankind," said Bishara.

Revolution in their eyes

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

The CIA really knows how to work a crowd, eh, al-Q? [img]http://archive.rabble.ca/babble/biggrin.gif[/img]

al-Qa'bong

Yeah, either that or they had a spy in every home.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Jesse McLaren, in Part 2 of his rabble blog post, wrote:

The Arab spring is a huge threat to Western imperialism in the region, and the counter-revolution is taking a variety of forms: direct military intervention in Libya, indirect intervention through Saudi Arabia in Bahrain, and a combination of weapons sales and  "financial aid" in Egypt, and the government was just forced to reject the loan--citing the "pressure of public opinion".  But with the Eurozone in crisis, the funds are relatively small for such a large and strategic country as Egypt. Meanwhile the internal counter-revolution in Egypt is based on a combination of co-opting and attacking the revolution.

[url=http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/jesse/2011/06/egyptian-revolution-phase-...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Protests Spread In Egypt As Discontent With Military Rule Grows

July 11th, 2011 By Jack Shenker in Cairo:

Protests have brought Egypt‘s administrative and commercial nerve centres to a standstill , as government attempts to stem a growing wave of opposition to military rule succeeded only in galvanising demonstrators further.

The interim prime minister, Essam Sharaf, took to the airwaves late on Saturday pledging to “meet the people’s demands”, following mass rallies across the country in which Egyptians accused the ruling council of army generals of betraying the revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak this year.

In a short and strained address to the nation, Sharaf said all police officers accused of killing protesters would be stopped from working, and promised that the trials of former Mubarak ministers and other regime officials would proceed “as soon as possible”. He insisted that social and economic problems would be reviewed by the army-appointed transitional cabinet.

But activists dismissed the announcement as empty rhetoric and claimed it contained nothing substantive. “His speech sounded like one of these tricks of the old government,” Sherif, an engineer in his late 20s, told local news website Ahram Online. “If this government is unable to take serious steps, it should resign.”.....

http://www.thenewsignificance.com/2011/07/11/jack-shenker-protests-sprea...

 

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