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Sean in Ottawa

NDPP wrote:

This could go several places, I'll put it here because Iran could easily become the flashpoint of a nuclear armageddon. Don't forget to plan on attending an antiwar rally near you Saturday. It's important.

'The Most Dangerous Situation That Humanity Has Ever Faced': Doomsday Clock Now 100 Seconds To Midnight

https://go.shr.lc/2vht8MA

"Citing the worsening nuclear threat and inaction on the climate crisis, scientists issue a historic warning about the risk of global conflagration..."

Good to put it here on anywhere.

The danger is fed by a willingness to demonize groups of people -- something many people do and we should all watch for and avoid ourselves.

kropotkin1951

Unfortunately it is getting harder and harder to get alternative media sources as the US has moved to use people killing sanctions as a tool to limit who can use the internet platforms controlled by Western billionaires. I posted this link in the Iraq thread for a different quote about but found this part relevant to an Iranian thread as well.

The message of the million man march was impossible to miss: the main stage of the event featured a huge banner with the words “GET OUT AMERICA” printed in giant upper case English letters, while protesters carried signs that featured slogans like “Americans elect moron criminals & the rest of the world suffers destruction,” “Trump is destroying America and the world,” and, perhaps most ominously, “You arrived vertically but will leave horizontally.”

The most comprehensive English language coverage by far was, ironically, from Iranian-government owned channel Press TV, who had live video feeds of the events with round-the-clock coverage and commentary in English. Ironic because last week Google deleted Press TV from its platforms, including YouTube, making it far harder for Western audiences to access it. The media attack on the public’s ability to hear alternative opinions continued as Facebook announced that, because of U.S. sanctions, it was legally compelled to remove all content that contradicted the Trump administration’s position on Soleimani’s assassination or shared an Iranian government perspective. “We operate under U.S. sanctions laws, including those related to the U.S. government’s designation of the IRGC and its leadership,” a Facebook spokesperson said. This is particularly problematic as Soleimani was, according to American surveys, “the most popular Iranian public figure” with over 80 percent of the country having a positive or very positive opinion of him. This effectively means that the Trump administration has control over the opinions that the world – and Iranians themselves – see on social media.

https://www.mintpressnews.com/iraq-million-man-march-tell-us-troops-leav...

Sean in Ottawa

Iranians are often less supportive of their involvement in other countries than some people in those countries becuase many of them resent the priority when they are struggling.

As well it is worth noting that the Iraq government is closer to the Iranian government than many of the people on the street. These mass protest that have been happening against the Iraq government may now move to protesting the Americans as the population there is frustrated that neither their governmetn, the Iranian government or the Iraq government are listening to them. Each have a different agenda but it does not coincide with the people. Also noteworthy is the degree to which Hia clerics in Iraq are criticizing the Iranian involvement and are very much more populist than the governments of Iraq or Iran.

The presence of foreign troop in Iraq is very much disturbing and distracting from resolution of divisions that exist there and overlaying a whole new set of problems. If the Americans thought there was a role for them to play positive to Iraq, Trump's strike blew it away. 

NDPP

Important points. As is obvious with the Assange/Manning/Snowden cases, there is a concerted attempt to demonize, suppress or silence views that deviate from western master-narratives designed to support its hegemonic domination and geostrategic power-plays.

Sean in Ottawa

NDPP wrote:

Important points. As is obvious with the Assange/Manning/Snowden cases, there is a concerted attempt to demonize, suppress or silence views that deviate from western master-narratives designed to support its hegemonic domination and geostrategic power-plays.

Certainly but we should not see everything as a side in pro and anti-Western presence. 

Those against Western invovlement may not all be decided about what they want. Part of the problem with imperialism is that it prevents resolutions to other important divisions. 

BTW -- one of the leaders of the protests there has in the past been pro Iran and anti Iran. (I was told his name an hour ago but I cannot spell it)  He was protesting the Iranian invovlement in Iraq just weeks ago and thanks to the American aggression is now sounding less hostile to Iran as he engages with the issue of American presence. It is not unusual for people on the ground to change sides to go from what is one problem to have to then unite to deal with a great problem. 

 

NDPP

Fars News farsnews.com an Iranian news source has now been blocked, presumably by the US regime. Iranian readers can still access it at farsnews.ir and for now it appears their english twitter feed is still accessible. Figured if Washington didn't want me reading it perhaps it was worth a look. It was...

Senior MP: US Attempting to Reactivate ISIL in 5 Iraqi Provinces

https://twitter.com/EnglishFars/status/1220589831526539264

kropotkin1951

There are some very interesting polling findings in this piece.

3. Attitudes Toward OtherSecurity Challenges(p. 13)

The public’s doubts about the value of trying to addressing other contentious issues through diplomacy and mutual compromise has grown. On the JCPOA, seven in ten now think the experience shows it is not worthwhile for Iran to make concessions, because other powers will not follow through—up from two thirds in January 2018. Four in ten believe that signing the JCPOA at the time was the right thing to do, but a fifth think Iran should have held out for a better deal and a third think Iran should not have negotiated over its nuclear program at all. On Iran’s ballistic missile program, a majority says the issue is non-negotiable, and three in five view the program as an effective deterrent. Those open to negotiating on Middle Eastern regional issues havedropped to four in ten. A large majority thinks Iran should act punitively whenever there is evidence of violation of Iranian territory or an attack on an Iranian vessel or aircraft, and not prioritize avoiding a wider conflict.A three-in-five majoritycontinues to support keeping Iranian military personnel in Syria—essentially unchanged from three years ago. Three in four think that even if Iran were to halt the Iranian Public Opinion under “Maximum Pressure”5IRGC’s activities in Syria and Iraq, there would either be little effect on U.S.relations, or the United States would try to extract more concessions through sanctions. When asked to choose between building up Iran’s power in the region or seeking to negotiate mutually acceptable solutions, there is no majority position among Iranians, but slightly more prefer building up Iran’s power. A large majority perceive recent attacks on Saudi refineries as justified.At the same time, majorities remain positive about some international agreements and proposals. Three quarters say Iran’s joining the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) was a good idea.As in the past, two thirds would favor a nuclear weapons-free zone in the Middle East that would include both Islamic countries and Israel.

4.Views of the United States(p. 22)

Over four in five express negative attitudes toward the United States—the highest level recorded in 13 years, including during the Iraq War. A clear majority now has the perception that the United States did not fulfill its JCPOA obligations even before the Trump administration. Majorities experience that there are fewer imported medical and humanitarian goods available compared to a year ago, and believe that the United States has a policy of blocking these goods.Asked to think whether, if a different U.S. president is elected in 2020, the United States might return to the JCPOA, more think this unlikely than think it likely.

7.Attitudes on Corruption(p. 34)

A clear majority of Iranians feel that the nation’s economy is not being run for the benefit of all the people. A majority thinks Rouhani’s administration is trying only a little or not at all to fight corruption, and fewer than three in ten say it has increased its efforts over the last year. The judiciary—headed since March 2019 by Raisi, a conservative who ran against Rouhani in 2017—receives much better marks, with over seven in ten saying it is trying to fight corruption, and three in five saying its efforts have increased since last year. Majority perceptions of the judiciary’s resolve against corruption grew sharply from May to August, as did the favorability ratings of Raisi.

Views of Political Figures(p. 36)

General Soleimani remains the most popular Iranian public figure among those tested, with eight in ten viewing him favorably. Second is Foreign Minister Zarif, viewed favorably by two thirds. Ebrahim Raisi—who ran unsuccessfully for president in 2017 and was made the head of Iran’s judiciary in March 2019—has seen significant growth in popularity since May and is now viewed favorably by nearly two thirds. For the first time, a little under half of Iranians view President Rouhani favorably. Mohammad Ghalibaf, ex-mayor of Tehran—who also ran for president in 2017 but stood down in favor of Raisi—is favorably regarded by three in five. Ex-president Ahmadinejad is seen favorably by a modest majority. As in the past, a large majority says it expects to vote in the Majlis elections coming in February 2020.

9. Views of the Revolutionary Guard(p. 38)

Majorities are broadly supportive of the IRGC. Four in five say the IRGC’s activities in the Middle East have made Iran more secure—a view that has increased since May. At home, three in five say the IRGC performed very well in its emergency response in the severe March-April floods. Asked whether the IRGC should be less involved in construction projects and economic matters, only three in ten agree.

10. Climate and Weather Issues(p. 39)

Well over four in five Iranians are concerned that they will be personally harmed by global climate change. Even in the current economic contraction, almost two thirds say they want the government to place a higher priority on protecting the environment. (Severe March and April floods after years of drought conditions may have played a role in responses.)Asked about organizations’ work in emergency response to the floods, Iranians gave their highest marks to the Iranian people themselves—followed by the Red Crescent Society, the military,and the IRGC. Lowest marks went to international aid organizations.

11. Media and News Consumption(p. 41)

Domestic television channels are a news source for three quarters of Iranians, though the audience has declined slightly since January 2018. Two thirds find their news on the internet, and this practice has been growing. Two thirds use social networking apps for news. After these, satellite television programs and newspapers lag far behind. The numbers of people relying on domestic television aswell as VOA and BBC news programs have declined significantly since the rise of social media in Iran.

https://cissm.umd.edu/sites/default/files/2019-10/Iranian%20PO%20under%2...

Sean in Ottawa

I asked an Iranian about this survey. They just laughed at me.

So here is the question: how do you convince a person in Iran to share an opinion not friendly to the government and feel safe.

Polling is problematic in places that take people away in the middle of the night never to be seen again - for their opinions. 

You think polling is a problem  here where only 95-99% hang up when you make a connection? (Yeah that is the rate -- auto dialer does number after number, person introduces themselves over and over again until someone agrees to answer). Then we presume they speak for all those who do not. When you have a government that kills its own citizens as easily as they do, it might be a good idea to answer and give the results you think the government wants - Or at least the opinions they would not consider throwing you in jail for.

kropotkin1951

Whatever Sean. Here is the polling company information and methodology for those who may want to make up their own minds on sources. Apparently they have some ability to poll people despite the inherent problems with polling in this digital age.

The Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM)

The Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM)The Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM) at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy conducts research, education, and outreach about how powerful trends associated with globalization are affecting international security. It focuses on strategies to increase international cooperation, especially where powerful technologies—with both beneficial and dangerous uses—are becoming widely available to states and non-state actors. To learn more about CISSM, visit www.cissm.umd.edu.

IranPoll

IranPoll® is an independent full-service opinion research company headquartered in Toronto, Canada, focusing exclusively on Iran. A division of People Analytics, IranPoll conducts research on Iranian public opinion using various modes of data collection including telephone polling (including a monthly Omnibus), in-depth interviews, focus groups, and online panel (B2B and 51k-member B2C). IranPoll operates multiple polling call centers with 106 calling stations and conducts over 160,000 interviews per year in Iran. Relying on scientific opinion research methods, IranPoll was able to provide a fully accurate prediction of the outcome of Iran’s May 2017 presidential election, which was published by The Economist before the initial official results were declared. Complementing its extensive field capacity, IranPoll’s databank is the single most comprehensive databank of Iranian opinion polls containing more than 3,000 questions on 430 topics and subtopics frommore than 350 probability sample surveys conducted from 2006 to present. Through its exclusive access to this databank, IranPoll provides its clients with evidence-based consultancy on issues relating to Iran and the Iranian people.The completion of this studywas supported partially by funds from t

 

https://cissm.umd.edu/sites/default/files/2019-10/Iranian%20PO%20under%2...

Sean in Ottawa

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Whatever Sean. Here is the polling company information and methodology for those who may want to make up their own minds on sources. Apparently they have some ability to poll people despite the inherent problems with polling in this digital age.

The Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM)

The Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM)The Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM) at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy conducts research, education, and outreach about how powerful trends associated with globalization are affecting international security. It focuses on strategies to increase international cooperation, especially where powerful technologies—with both beneficial and dangerous uses—are becoming widely available to states and non-state actors. To learn more about CISSM, visit www.cissm.umd.edu.

IranPoll

IranPoll® is an independent full-service opinion research company headquartered in Toronto, Canada, focusing exclusively on Iran. A division of People Analytics, IranPoll conducts research on Iranian public opinion using various modes of data collection including telephone polling (including a monthly Omnibus), in-depth interviews, focus groups, and online panel (B2B and 51k-member B2C). IranPoll operates multiple polling call centers with 106 calling stations and conducts over 160,000 interviews per year in Iran. Relying on scientific opinion research methods, IranPoll was able to provide a fully accurate prediction of the outcome of Iran’s May 2017 presidential election, which was published by The Economist before the initial official results were declared. Complementing its extensive field capacity, IranPoll’s databank is the single most comprehensive databank of Iranian opinion polls containing more than 3,000 questions on 430 topics and subtopics frommore than 350 probability sample surveys conducted from 2006 to present. Through its exclusive access to this databank, IranPoll provides its clients with evidence-based consultancy on issues relating to Iran and the Iranian people.The completion of this studywas supported partially by funds from t

 

https://cissm.umd.edu/sites/default/files/2019-10/Iranian%20PO%20under%2...

We had a party today with a couple dozen Iranians and we talked about this poll. It was quite interesting.

No the issue you ignore is that no company or methodology can get over the fact that people are reluctant to speak against a government in a state like this.

Several of these people also expressed concerns that people may work for good companies or universities and still not be trustworthy. Corruption is rampant and the state and authorities are not trusted by those who oppose them. Soliciting what would include anti-government opinions cannot be done reliably no matter what the methodology is if people feel any expression of an anti-government opinion is unsafe.

But what the fuck do I know these are only Iranians speaking about Iran? -- of course you know best your royal imperial highness.

kropotkin1951

I am merely posting things that I think people will find interesting. I am sure that your circle of Iranian friends do not suffer from confirmation bias so indeed anything you say should be taken as representing the breadth and depth of the political discourse that takes place in Iran.

However despite your obvious "authority" on this subject I still come here to chat and discuss politics so I really don't care what you say to me or how you insult me I will continue to post articles and my opinions.

kropotkin1951

Here is an interesting article with a lot of good history embedded in it.

Over the past three weeks, many analysts have focused on how the assassination of General Qassem Soleimani will affect the Iran-US confrontation in the Middle East. Little attention has been paid, however, to the effect his death will have on the internal affairs of Iran.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/mystification-qassem-soleimani...

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Interesting indeed. Thanks for the link.

Sean in Ottawa

kropotkin1951 wrote:

I am merely posting things that I think people will find interesting. I am sure that your circle of Iranian friends do not suffer from confirmation bias so indeed anything you say should be taken as representing the breadth and depth of the political discourse that takes place in Iran.

However despite your obvious "authority" on this subject I still come here to chat and discuss politics so I really don't care what you say to me or how you insult me I will continue to post articles and my opinions.

Mixed with my angry responses to you I actually include content and logic. You just attack. This is why I have no respect for you at all. You also have an agenda that is clear from your posts and despite the fact that everyone here has a bias you never let logic or facts get in the way of what you want to say.

Your stuff in response to people is not so much interesting as deeply biased and due to your attitudes immune from logic or facts You are impossible to argue with becuase you do not engage except to attack points of view and people but never get into what actually has been said either logically or factually.

It is true that often when you are clearly not responding to what someone has said you post soemthing actually interesting at the same time as an attack. Classic deflection to make people not notice that you ignored the content of other posts.

I have never seen you respond on actual content such as the question of why would people in Iran would feel comfortable answering a survey with an anti-government opinion given that anti-government opinions can get you killed.

If you do not think that the opposition in Iran fears government in a way that does not happen here you are delusional.

Sean in Ottawa

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Here is an interesting article with a lot of good history embedded in it.

Over the past three weeks, many analysts have focused on how the assassination of General Qassem Soleimani will affect the Iran-US confrontation in the Middle East. Little attention has been paid, however, to the effect his death will have on the internal affairs of Iran.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/mystification-qassem-soleimani...

While the article is interesting it is also controversial. It makes several points about the upcoming election and includes what appears to be a contradiction.

At one point it speaks to the election as being crucial and how reformists and moderates hope to make a comeback. All the people who have spoken to me about this say that the chances for reformists are virtually nonexistent. The reason is twofold: first the best candidates (as the article acknowledges) have been barred from running. Secondly, those who are running face the challenge that supporters are torn between voting for them and boycotting the election which gives that entire side a massive disadvantage. I am not hearing any hope whatsoever for any movement towards anything reformist or moderate -- only a question of how much damage will be done in the other direction.

When it comes the the death of Soleimani, the article is also not completely in line with many of the things I have been hearing. First, his strategy is not without considerable controversy - particularly in times of restricted resources. But there are also two impacts not mentionned here: first, whether or not you agree with him he was widely regarded as one of the more intelligent and strategic thinkers in the Supreme leader's immediate circle. The regime will feel the loss of this and some are suggesting that the quality of some of the decisions may be reduced even if the general direction is maintained.

Another point is that his strategy has been to use engagement in a two way strategy -- not just to project power. When the regime has been challenged and needs to crack down, it imports loyalists from these allied groups in other countries as extra muscle in cracking down. These are loyalists more to the cause of the Shia religion and the broader vision it has of the middle east, and the IRG and supreme leader, than the state of Iran itself or the people. It remains to be seen if without Soleimani pressing the acuse if the same strategies will be followed without any changes. Iranians tend to beleive that many who were firing on them during protest were not actually Iranian. 

Lastly the divisons within the government seem to be a little under-emphasized. The struggle between the elected and unelected branches of the governemnt are very significant. An example is the Assad meeting in Iran, not only was the foreign minister and President not there -- they did not even know the meeting was happening. the elected government is weaker as an institution than most outside the country can imagine an elected government being.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

http://www.yahoo.com/news/irans-president-rouhani-reportedly-threatened-172444233.html 

Well look at that… I’m actually jealous they seem to have an adult in the room as president.  ;->

kropotkin1951

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Mixed with my angry responses to you I actually include content and logic. You just attack. This is why I have no respect for you at all. You also have an agenda that is clear from your posts and despite the fact that everyone here has a bias you never let logic or facts get in the way of what you want to say.

Your stuff in response to people is not so much interesting as deeply biased and due to your attitudes immune from logic or facts You are impossible to argue with becuase you do not engage except to attack points of view and people but never get into what actually has been said either logically or factually.

It is true that often when you are clearly not responding to what someone has said you post soemthing actually interesting at the same time as an attack. Classic deflection to make people not notice that you ignored the content of other posts.

I have never seen you respond on actual content such as the question of why would people in Iran would feel comfortable answering a survey with an anti-government opinion given that anti-government opinions can get you killed.

If you do not think that the opposition in Iran fears government in a way that does not happen here you are delusional.

NDPP

PUSHBACK: Israel Has Played A Key Role in US Aggression Towards Iran (Must Watch!)

https://youtu.be/Kg5D6sqvfpA

"As the Trump administration's stated rationale for killing Qasem Soleimani and Abu Mahdi al Muhandis collapses, journalist Gareth Porter has pieced together the overloaded background.

Porter reports that the assassination was in fact the culmination of a lengthy provocation campaign involving Mike Pompeo, John Bolton and the Israeli government, which carried out a number of under-reported bombings inside Iraq and Syria in the months prior.

Porter's latest book with John Kiriakou is The CIA Insider's Guide to the Iran Crisis."

Sean in Ottawa

NDPP wrote:

PUSHBACK: Israel Has Played A Key Role in US Aggression Towards Iran (Must Watch!)

https://youtu.be/Kg5D6sqvfpA

"As the Trump administration's stated rationale for killing Qasem Soleimani and Abu Mahdi al Muhandis collapses, journalist Gareth Porter has pieced together the overloaded background.

Porter reports that the assassination was in fact the culmination of a lengthy provocation campaign involving Mike Pompeo, John Bolton and the Israeli government, which carried out a number of under-reported bombings inside Iraq and Syria in the months prior.

Porter's latest book with John Kiriakou is The CIA Insider's Guide to the Iran Crisis."

While true, I do not think this is unknown and it goes back to the start of the administration. But yes.

kropotkin1951

This should come as little surprise to most people on this board. The US is apparently lying about the reasons for the assassination. Once again the best way to tell if an American official is lying about intelligence reports is to watch and see if their lips are moving.

The Trump administration has not released a single piece of evidence showing that the Iraqi militia Khataib Hezbollah, which has ties to Iran, was responsible for the attack on K-1. The group has denied carrying out the attack.

...

"We as Iraqi forces cannot even come to this area unless we have a large force because it is not secure," Brig. Gen. Adnan said of the area from which the rocket attack was launched. "How could it be that someone who doesn't know the area could come here and find that firing position and launch an attack?"

In response to the Times report, Jamal Abdi, president of the National Iranian American Council, tweeted: "Al-Qaeda attacked the U.S. on 9/11 and we went to war with Iraq. If this report is true, ISIS attacked the U.S. and we nearly went to war with Iran."

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/02/07/bombshell-iraqi-officials-s...

 

 

NDPP

According to the Canadian courts, who have awarded millions of dollars in seized Iranian assets to US 911 claimants, it was Iran that was behind 911. It is things like this that come to mind anytime someone starts preaching about Canada's commitment to 'the rule of law' and our 'non-political', 'impartial' and 'impeccable' justice system.

Sean in Ottawa

NDPP wrote:

According to the Canadian courts, who have awarded millions of dollars in seized Iranian assets to US 911 claimants, it was Iran that was behind 911. It is things like this that come to mind anytime someone starts preaching about Canada's commitment to 'the rule of law' and our 'non-political', 'impartial' and 'impeccable' justice system.

I agree -- that was a money grab and nothing else.

Sean in Ottawa

Iran has 2 cases of the corona virus. This is a big deal if it goes further. I hope that they are able to get cooperation from the world to combat this.

Sean in Ottawa

There are a lot of concerns about this Iran situation with Cronavirus. Here are some issues:

1) Iran has an advanced modern medical system. It is one of the more strong parts of their infrastructure. It is suffering from the lack of parts and money due to sanctions but is known to have excellent doctors and systems.

2) Iran is claiming two people just died there of the Crona virus. Worse, these people contracted it without having left the country.

3) See point one: it is not credible that they would only identify cronavirus after the people died. It is virtually certain, according to all sources I am hearing from, that it has been there a while and the government suppressed it. If you have two deaths in a modern health care system, where the people did not arrive from overseas, due to this illness, then you certainly have a lot more with the disease. (See death rate.) Not believable that they do not know given the advanced medical system.

4) The government is at the end of an election campaign. This is a campaign unlike most elections in that the result is a foregone conclusion -- the hardline Conservatives will win. The reason  is that 14,000 candidates have been barred from standing for the election -- due to not being among other things of good character, religious enough -- read hard line enough. This includes many of the candidates for the reformers and sitting representatives. As well, reformist parties have declined to release lists of candidates to support in protest. Many are calling for a boycott and many Iranians (other than hard liners) are saying that there is no point voting given how pathetic and ineffective the government has been on the reform side. Instead, the election result most anticipated is not the winner but the participation rate. See this issue in context of cronavirus fears and you see why the government may have wanted to conceal the problem until after the election.

5) The Iranian government may have wanted to conceal this but now may need to have international cooperation. there should be a concern that the US which is sharing with all international efforts could try to exclude Iran (maybe excuse of bioweapon etc. could be made). This would be serious. I can see the US at least considering this as the reaction would be what they want -- to close their borders as they think they can topple the regime due to its weakness. The US regime is not very bright so they may not realize that anything that threatens Iranian people directly will not be taken well by the American Iranian diaspora which is largely at least split when it comes to a hard line against the Iranian government. This is similar to the reaction to threats to bomb cultural sites. The most anti-Iranian government activists were furious with the President over this. Same thing in Canada: the Iranian community is divided on the government but not on the welfare of the people.

6) It is not clear that the Iranian government is in a position to easily survive a crisis closing the border. The Iraq border is now closed. Iran is still allowing direct flights to China, one of the only countries to do this and some in the government are saying that they are not yet people see it happening. The most important land border of Iran when it comes to emergencies is likely with Turkey. If Turkey shuts the border this is devastating for the regime. If they do not, Europe will likely consider something on their border with Turkey if Turkey has a problem with an outbreak in Iran and does not manage their border. BTW-- one of the issues in Iran is known smuggling of oil and gas. The revolutionary guard do this on a grand scale and individuals do it on a small scale (one reason why the price increase to retail stations was met with such anger last fall -- and this is the reason for it. The regime is corrupt and the Guard make money by selling the country's oil (the money gets laundered off shore in places like Canada btw and enriches the Guard but not the Iranian people). Other countries closing the border for health purposes could harm some of the smuggling operations.

6) Bottom line, Iran under sanctions is fragile. There are many lives at risk here not just from the disease but the economic fallout

7) We should expect that if this develops into a health emergency in Canada there will be some controversy especially if the Iranain government is at least partly responsible. We could be in the position of having to suspend criticism in order to provide immediate held to the people of a humanitarian nature, even while being concerned that the government is not a honest, good, corruption free partner. As always, the safety of the people should be placed above political concerns including any that might be justified relating to management of the problem. 

8) Pulling back on the sanctions would be a humanitarian reaction that should happen. Bad behaviour on the part of both the US and the Iranian government could make this more difficult. These are bad times to be an Iranian in Iran. I hope Canada will get pressured to show some humanitarian leadership despite anger over the lack of appropriate cooperation regarding the air crash investigation.

Sean in Ottawa

Nowruz mubarak - to any Iranians seeing this thread. Wishing this year is better than the last.

Douglas Fir Premier

Iran to pardon 10,000, including 'security' prisoners

Iran is to pardon 10,000 prisoners, including some charged with political crimes, in honour of the Iranian new year on Friday, according to state TV.

It was not stated whether the pardons would include the British-Iranian aid worker Nazanin Zachary-Ratcliffe – who was freed on Tuesday for two weeks as part of a separate programme under which 85,000 have temporarily been released because of coronavirus.

 

 

NDPP

But our friend and ally the UK, a lickspittling American lacky like Canada, will not be releasing the political prisoner and publisher Julian Assange from prison or the kangaroo court process he has been subjected to. He  is also a good example of someone deliberately punished and tortured by being forced to endure  almost a year of 'quarantine' with the addition of an enforced state of virtual incommunicado. With each fresh step in his persecution cheered on by the usual 'progressives' here who believe whatever the Guardian or NYT says.

NDPP

How Victims of the US 'Maximum Pressure' Campaign Are Coping With Coronavirus

https://t.co/h4Lsr5hdnV?amp=1

"Despite crippling sanctions, years of war, military intervention and a 'maximum pressure' campaign that has only increased since the coronavirus began, victims of America's heavy-handed foreign policy are rising to the challenge. With the country scrambling to handle the crisis, nations are refusing to sell the Islamic Republic medical supplies for fear of running afoul of US sanctions.

In one of this tweets [Iran FM] Zarif expressed his frustration in the strongest terms, 'It is immoral to let a bully (US) kill innocents,' he said. And this is precisely what US sanctions are doing. The US and its EU and UK [and Canadian] allies have systematically imposed sanctions upon target nations with the knowledge that these measures collectively punish the ordinary people in these nations..."

Sean in Ottawa

NDPP wrote:

But our friend and ally the UK, a lickspittling American lacky like Canada, will not be releasing the political prisoner and publisher Julian Assange from prison or the kangaroo court process he has been subjected to. He  is also a good example of someone deliberately punished and tortured by being forced to endure  almost a year of 'quarantine' with the addition of an enforced state of virtual incommunicado. With each fresh step in his persecution cheered on by the usual 'progressives' here who believe whatever the Guardian or NYT says.

I was hoping in the thread for today that we could emphasize recognition of the terrible time Iranians are having everywhere in the world given this is a truly awful new year especially for them and the last year has been unbelievably bad. 

Anyway I will go back to the Iranian in this house... 

NDPP

I share best wishes for Nowruz Mubarak greetings to Iranians here and there. I have Iranian friends too.  I have no idea why you would take umbrage or might seek to defend sanctions, but obviously as with the demonization of China over coronavirus, one is free to hold forth (with or without an Iranian) as you wish. I'm sure if you had a mind you could also  find in Canada a Venezuelan to tell us all about the evil dictatorial regime there and why they might deserve to be deprived of the necessaries of life for democracy and US regime change, as is the case, as well. But it's wrong, because these hurt people not leaders.

Douglas Fir Premier

NDPP wrote:

But our friend and ally the UK, a lickspittling American lacky like Canada, will not be releasing the political prisoner and publisher Julian Assange from prison or the kangaroo court process he has been subjected to. He  is also a good example of someone deliberately punished and tortured by being forced to endure  almost a year of 'quarantine' with the addition of an enforced state of virtual incommunicado. With each fresh step in his persecution cheered on by the usual 'progressives' here who believe whatever the Guardian or NYT says.

I quoted the second paragraph not for the reference to Nazanin Zachary-Ratcliffe (whose situation I'm entirely unfamiliar with), but for the news that 85,000 prisoners had been released. That, to me, seemed noteworthy.

But, it was reported in the Guardian, so maybe we should not accept that as fact. Maybe all 85,000 are still in prison.

Sean in Ottawa

NDPP wrote:

I share best wishes for Nowruz Mubarak greetings to Iranians here and there. I have Iranian friends too.  I have no idea why you would take umbrage or might seek to defend sanctions, but obviously as with the demonization of China over coronavirus, one is free to hold forth (with or without an Iranian) as you wish. I'm sure if you had a mind you could also  find in Canada a Venezuelan to tell us all about the evil dictatorial regime there and why they might deserve to be deprived of the necessaries of life for democracy and US regime change, as is the case, as well. But it's wrong, because these hurt people not leaders.

I take umbrage at lying assholes. I really have little patience for this tactic especially as there are a few on this site who do it. I do call it out when I see it and especially when they are doing about me. 

I posted a message in the Iranian thread to wish Iranians well in a bad year for their new year - you changed the topic and did not even acknowledge it in that post. Yes, I found that a bit offensive.

The rest of your post is lying bullshit.

I have not been defending sanctions against Iran or China -- I never have. I have wanted sanctions against that country pulled down and diplomatic relations established. This does not mean I think the government is nice - just that sanctions hurt the poorest and relations are essential. I have said here that the govenrment of Iran AND the government of the United States do not give a shit for the people. I am not black and white like you. I do not have to pick a side like a loyal soldier.

I have never demonized China over anything. 

I am not defenders of that government either but there are some people who can tell the difference between a people and a government. I have opposed demonization of China -- I have even brought up history of that country - I studied it and am interested in it. I have spoken out consistently about the racism that is coming at them from people over covid19.

My comments are for those people who can tell the difference between a country and a people and who do not live in a monochrome world. Too bad you are not one of them.

As for the suggestion that I have found some solitary Iranian that does not like the goernment -- again you are an ass. I am in touch at this moment with more Iranians than Canadians -- hundreds. Not your fucking business why.

They overwhelmingly are not supportive of the government there. As I said before, this does not mean they want the sanctions or that they like Trump. The anger agaisnt the killing of the general in Iraq was not support for the government. If you knew any Iranians -- for real -- I think you would have known the fury in the community here about the plane being shot down. I can see that you are incapble of reading, understanding and representing what I say here so I have no faith that you can accurately and honestly understand anything going on around you.

But you are right. I react strongly to people who are assholes. Sorry you qualified and got in the way. 

NDPP

The US, Iran, China & Perspectives on the Global Crisis (and vid)

https://twitter.com/Gh_Tari/status/1290541951587102720

"The Institute for North American and European Studies, hosted by Zeinab Ghasemi Tari. Guests: Alastair Crooke, Pepe Escobar and Seyed Mohammad Marandi."

NDPP

Iran's Zarif: US, Israel Nukes Threaten Our Region (and vid)

https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2020/08/06/631225/Iran-United-States-nucl...

"Iran's foreign minister says more than seven decades after the US nuclear massacre in the Japanese city of Hiroshima, Washington's infamous legacy lives on with that country and its staunch ally Israel now menacing the West Asia region wiht their nuclear arsenals.

'75 years ago today, the US gained the infamy of being the 1st and ONLY user of nuclear weapons. And against innocents. Today, US & Israeli nukes threaten our region. It's long overdue to end the nuclear nightmare and the doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction.'

Tehran is an NPT signatory that roundly rejects either development or possession of nuclear arms on religious and humanitarian grounds."

Yet Canada firmly supports both these malevolent nuclear threats to the region.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

International Community Counters Trump over U.N. Iran Sanctions

The Trump administration will reportedly announce sanctions on over two dozen people and entities related to Iran’s nuclear program as early as today. This comes after the U.S. unilaterally declared the reimposition of all U.N. sanctions against Iran. But the U.N., including fellow Security Council members and allies Britain, France and Germany, all say international sanctions against Iran have not resumed, and the U.S. has no legal standing to enforce such a move. Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Iran nuclear agreement in 2018.

NDPP

Rouhani calls Pompeo 'minister of crimes', dubs renewed US sanctions 'savagery' against Iranians amid COVID-19 Pandemic

https://on.rt.com/ar62

"...The Americans recently inflicted tens of billions of dollars in damages on Iran, President Hassan Rouhani exclaimed while talking to the nation on Saturday. The fresh round of punitive measures, which he called 'unjust, inhumane terrorist operations,' and 'savagery' towards Iranians, have stopped medicines and food from coming to the Islamic Republic as it continues to battle the coronavirus pandemic, he said..."

NDPP

US Imposes Crushing Sanctions on Iran, Defying Humanitarian Concerns

https://twitter.com/sanasaeed/status/1314264258914459649

"The US is doing everything it can [for Israel] to suffocate and crush the people of Iran. By imposing these sanctions, the US is cutting off Iranians from food and medicine. But it's the Iranians who are the monsters bent on destruction and death, right?"

Canada supports the stranglers.

NDPP

#ThereIsNoInsulin

https://twitter.com/s_m_marandi/status/1317889030634102784

"There's an acute shortage of insulin in Iran. Western regimes and media will try to blame Iran, but all know that the US 'maximum pressure strategy' is designed to kill Iranian citizens. The EU, Canada, Korea and other obedient regimes block Iranian assets and refuse to export medicine."

I'm sure nice Canada's Bob Rae at the UN will be right on this, no? Or ask the Nice Democratic Party (NDP) if they support this. If as I believe, they do, then obviously those Iranian diabetics must deserve it. See also #588 above

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