NDP BC invades sovereign Wet'suwet'en territory, RCMP arrest defenders

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NDPP

'RCMP Pensions Invested in CGL'

https://twitter.com/AgentNdn/status/1232736470517108736"

"Revelations about RCMP pensions being invested in CGL explain why police are enforcing injunctions for said company when it doesn't even have proper permits. RCMP can no longer maintain even the pretense of neutrality or professionalism. They must leave Wetsuweten territory.

#WetsuwetenStrong  #RCMPout  #NoTreatyNoJurisdictionNoPipelinesNoRCMP  #ShutDownCanada

NDPP

'Just Resign Already'

https://twitter.com/mrjohnmuller/status/1232847337342558209

"You're fucking joking John Horgan. That was your plan? Demand they give up their biggest and best bargaining chip before you even sit at the table? Just resign already."

[email protected]

#WetsuwetenStrong  #SovereigntyIsTheAnswerCanadaIsTheProblem  #JustinLies  #ShutDownCanada

NDPP

Meet The New Deception Party (NDP)

https://twitter.com/RussDiabo/status/1232874050655047680

'Don't worry John I got your back*, I appointed myself critic of Indigenous Issues, we can double team those other Indians opposing the CGL Pipline!'

https://youtu.be/CvXhyM29Wbw

In BC, little is as it appears to be...

#NoDifferenceParty  #DishonourOfTheCrown  #NeverTrustCanadianPoliticians #SovereigntyIsTheAnswerCanadaIsTheProblem  #WetsuwetenStrong  #ShutDownCanada

NDPP

"We continue to see reports of new blockades popping up in different locations..."

https://twitter.com/ricochet_en/status/1232814499297742848

#WetsuwetenSolidarity  #ReconciliationIsDead  #ShutDownCanada #thetimeisnow

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..2.24 min youtube video

Rail blockades escalate, disrupt commutes

...

Wet’suwet’en protesters standing on the highway, at Mount Newton X-Road, in Central Saanich. #yyj

Link

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Meeting back on with federal, B.C. governments: Wet'suwet'en hereditary chief

A meeting between the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, the federal government and the British Columbia government is set to take place Thursday after it was abruptly cancelled Wednesday, one of the leaders of the First Nation said.

Chief Na'Moks, who also goes by John Ridsdale, said the meeting is scheduled in the afternoon and will continue Friday.

"It was abundantly clear to us that both levels of government had cancelled the discussions we had planned," he said.

By Wednesday evening, he said he and the other hereditary chiefs were told the cancellation was due to a "miscommunication."

He said talks broke down after they refused to ask other First Nations and their supporters to remove rail blockades throughout the country.

"In our law, we can't do that," he said. "We can't tell another sovereign nation what to do and we would not expect them to do that to us.".....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..good 6 min interview

Metro Morning

As the police arrest protesters in Tyendinaga, Jesse Wente questions the myths that Canadians believe about themselves

Pondering

epaulo13 wrote:

Meeting back on with federal, B.C. governments: Wet'suwet'en hereditary chief

A meeting between the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, the federal government and the British Columbia government is set to take place Thursday after it was abruptly cancelled Wednesday, one of the leaders of the First Nation said.

Chief Na'Moks, who also goes by John Ridsdale, said the meeting is scheduled in the afternoon and will continue Friday.

"It was abundantly clear to us that both levels of government had cancelled the discussions we had planned," he said.

By Wednesday evening, he said he and the other hereditary chiefs were told the cancellation was due to a "miscommunication."

He said talks broke down after they refused to ask other First Nations and their supporters to remove rail blockades throughout the country.

"In our law, we can't do that," he said. "We can't tell another sovereign nation what to do and we would not expect them to do that to us.".....

Government keeps trying to play bully then when it doesn't work they want to talk.

All this delaying was to gain public support for police action against the blockades. They are trying to figure out how many people they would have to arrest and even if they can arrest their way out of this without putting hundreds of people in jail and even then they couldn't be sure the tracks wouldn't be sabotaged in the wilderness. They don't have enough police, RCMP and military to guard the rail lines throughout Canada. 

They are really scared now. They should never have forced a showdown between First Nations and Canada. First Nations now know they have the power to cripple Canada. I took the train across Canada. There are miles and miles of track.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Supporters of the indigenous Wet'suwet'en Nation's hereditary chiefs block access to the Port of Vancouver as part of protests against the Coastal GasLink pipeline on Feb. 24, 2020.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

For immediate release Thursday February 27th

At 8am this morning, Kingston community members took to the tracks, occupying the main railroad through Kingston at the Gardiners Street Overpass. We act in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs and the Mohawk Nation, against the RCMP, the OPP, the governments of Canada, BC and Ontario, and against the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

The Kanyen'kehá:ka (Mohawk people) who we have worked with in the past taught us about the Two Row Wampum and our responsibility to do our own organizing in our own majority-settler community, and to hold our government to account.

We join the tens of thousands of Indigenous People, settlers and immigrants on this land known as Turtle Island to disrupt the only thing that government and corporate power recognizes: the conduits of corporate interests and business as usual. The railroad has always been a colonial tool for resource extraction and is a key component of an economy that is stripping the earth, and leaving its water poisoned, its animals pushed to extinction, and its climate in destructive chaos. We are acting for Indigenous sovereignty, and the end of an economy which values profit over people and the land.

We oppose the recent acts of brutality by the OPP against Mohawk warriors on their land in Tyendinaga. These attacks have been justified by suggesting that a Mohawk presence on their own land disrupts Canadian communities’ access to food, fuel, and chlorine to purify water. At the same time, access to clean water and food has not been a reality for many Indigenous communities for decades. We ask you what it says about the priorities of the Canadian government that they will act within days to ensure the movement of goods to bolster settler wellness, but continue to ignore toxic water alerts and mercury poisoning in communities occupied by the original caretakers of this land?

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Petition to the House of Commons in Parliament assembled

Whereas:

  • Canadian constitutional law is accountable to the human rights obligations outlined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP);
  • Canada has also committed to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's report "Calls to Action";
  • The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has called on Canada to: immediately suspend work on the Coastal GasLink pipeline until free, prior, and informed consent is obtained from Indigenous Peoples; immediately cease the forced eviction of Wet’suwet’en Peoples; prohibit the use of lethal weapons against Indigenous Peoples and guarantee no force will be used against them; withdraw the RCMP and associated security and policing services from traditional lands;
  • Hereditary Chiefs have the right to grant consent, or not, for activities on their territories; and
  • The Coastal GasLink project has the potential to release massive amounts of methane through the extraction, transport, liquefaction and regasification processes.

We, the undersigned, citizens and residents of Canada, call upon the House of Commons in Parliament assembled to commit to upholding the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action by immediately:.....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from mar/19

B.C. left holding massive bill for hundreds of orphan gas wells as frack companies go belly-up

Nearly 400 kilometres north of Fort St. John is a large, leaking fracking pond owned by Ranch Energy Corporation, a Calgary-based company that went into receivership last year leaving 700 gas wells in B.C. and a sea of debt.

The storage pond is filled with 113,000 cubic metres of sludge and water that may be contaminating soil and groundwater through a documented leak in its outer lining, according to the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission.

Twenty months ago, the commission issued an order to Predator Oil BC Ltd., the company that sold Ranch the wells, to empty the pond and test for contamination.

But nothing has been done. Ranch’s receiver, Ernst & Young, says it’s an expense the estate cannot afford.

The story of Ranch — pieced together by The Narwhal from a review of receivership documents and B.C. Oil and Gas Commission documents — highlights some of the mounting financial and environmental problems created by B.C.’s fracking industry.

And that’s even before a fracking blitz gets underway in the province’s Peace region, already covered by thousands of wells, to supply gas for the $40 billion LNG Canada project that will ship liquefied natural gas overseas.

quote:

Three oil and gas companies went belly-up last year

When companies like Ranch become insolvent, the provincial government is left holding much of the substantial clean-up bill for the industry equivalent of a dine and dash.

Ranch was just one of three companies operating in B.C. that went belly-up last year, leaving a forecast $12.3 million deficit in the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission’s orphan site reclamation fund, according to the commission’s annual service plan.

quote:

Ranch also owes $1.88 million to the B.C. ministry of finance, $478,000 to the B.C. Transportation Financing Authority, $93,000 to BC Hydro, $7,500 in carbon taxes, and almost $500,000 more to the government for various unpaid bills, receivership documents show. (B.C.’s finance ministry said it could not disclose the nature of the outstanding bills due to privacy concerns.)

swallow swallow's picture

Alberta motion, from Jason Kenney's twitter:

"Be it resolved, that the @LegAssemblyofAB unequivocally denounce the illegal blockading of Canada's core infrastructure, including railways, pipelines, ports & roadways & call for the law to be enforced without delay.”

The Alberta NDP voted in favour. 

The BCNDP is colonizing as we speak. 

The Sask NDP supports pipeines too. 

All 3 parties are enemies of human rights. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..the manitoba ndp also supported pipelines when in power not so long ago.

Khan: We who have been colonized should support Indigenous protests

Migrants have allowed ourselves to be co-opted into a vision of unity that conveniently ignores the history of where we have chosen to call home.

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..1.5 min video

It’s takes village to stop a genocide — Mohawks set up giant tent

Even as a train rolled by last night, Mohawks gathered in a harsh rainstorm to put up a massive series of tents to house people on Wyman Rd. The people are building infrastructure and capacity for those willing to stand up against RCMP and OPP bullying on unceded indigenous lands. Supporters of the Wet’suwet’en and Mohawks are invited to come and join the camp. Bring your own tents, plan to stay a while, follow the direction of camp organizers, bring what you need to support yourselves, and come be a part of history.

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Buffy Sainte-Marie & Tanya Tagaq "You Got To Run (Spirit Of The Wind)"

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THIS HOUR: Release from the B.C. RCMP says they’ve reached an agreement to withdraw from the Morice Forest Service Road to allow negotiations to happen. That was a key precondition for the #Wetsuweten hereditary chiefs. http://bc.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=2130&languageId=1&contentId=63473… #cdnpoli #bcpoli #WetsuwetenStong

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Pipeline construction paused as Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs prepare to meet federal, provincial ministers

Construction on a natural gas pipeline in northern B.C. has been paused for two days as Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs prepare to meet with provincial and federal ministers in hopes of resolving an impasse over the First Nation's land and title rights.

Chief Na'Moks, one of several hereditary chiefs opposed to construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline across Wet'suwet'en traditional territories, said the chiefs agreed to the meeting after TC Energy said it would stop work in the Morice River area near Houston, B.C.

"The Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs thank our supporters for their tireless dedication and now the chiefs need time to have discussions with B.C. and Canada in an atmosphere of wiggus (respect)," read a statement from the Office of the Wet'suwet'en on Thursday.

RCMP have also agreed to stop patrols on the Morice Forest Service Road while the meeting is underway, a statement confirmed.

The long-sought meeting between the ministers and hereditary chiefs is set to be held at a hotel in Smithers, B.C., and continue Friday. Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett arrived in the northwestern town on Thursday morning.

B.C. Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation Scott Fraser will arrive from Victoria in the afternoon. Earlier Thursday, the minister said he was eager to find a "path forward."

quote:

The talks on Thursday and Friday will be a preliminary round of discussions. Whether the chiefs and governments decide to proceed with further meetings will depend on what progress is made.

The statement from the Wet'suwet'en office said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and B.C. Premier John Horgan declined their invitations to meet "at this time."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..translated by my browser

Kahnawake chief Joe Norton links indigenous mobilization to global climate fight

In a statement that went unnoticed this week, the grand chief of the Mohawk Council of Kahnawake, Joe Tokwiro Norton, linked the current struggle of Aboriginal people across Canada directly to the global climate movement.​

Norton has accused Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and other politicians of not understanding the issue of the solidarity movement towards the community of Wet'usuwet'en, British Columbia, which opposes the authorities' decision federal authorities to impose the construction of a gas pipeline on its territory without having previously obtained the consent of its hereditary chiefs.

"No one here is going to do Mr. Trudeau's dirty work," said Norton on Wednesday. Our people demonstrate peacefully on our own territory. The Prime Minister, and all the other politicians, should understand what is at stake. It is not just an Aboriginal dispute. It is also an issue that affects the millions of people concerned about climate change and the voracity of companies who constantly want to expand the exploitation of fossil fuels and who, therefore, seek to allow these fuels to drain to markets in pipelines. "

It is not the first time that indigenous people have combined their fight for the respect of their lands with campaigns waged around the world against the unrestrained exploitation of oil and gas, the combustion of which dangerously warms the planet. Representatives of indigenous communities took part in the big climate demonstration on September 27 in Montreal with Greta Thunberg.

But in the context of the current crisis, Mr. Norton's words have a particular resonance because they inscribe the solidarity movement for the community of Wet'usuwet'en in an international and much broader movement. His statements are reported in Iori: Wase , an online newspaper from Kahnawake. They had little or no echo in the French media in Montreal.....

Pondering

That narrative is undermined by the fact that the Wet'usuwet'en do not oppose the pipeline going through their territory. They just want a detour that would still go through it but in areas that are already disturbed.  This is about a larger issue than just that one pipeline but the issue is indigenous sovereignty not climate change although many who support them are motived by climate change.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..another way to look at it..you can make a wheel with spokes with indigenous sovereignty at the center. the spokes are related/connected issues..not separate. 

ie..if indigenous folk see themselves as caretakers of mother earth how can that be separated from climate change.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..the other pipeline proposed could very well be tactical. lets not forget the forces attacking them that include violence, lies, poverty, genocide..people need to do what they need to to survive. 

Aristotleded24

Counter-protester removed from Winnipeg demonstration:

Quote:

Police removed a man who had tried intervening in the protests. The man was seen entering one of the circles, before being physically ousted by protesters. The man was eventually taken away by police. Some of the protestors told CTV News they were a little shaken up by the incident.

"There was just one individual who I guess was angry at the protest. I think it was a lack of understanding," one protestor said.

"A man decided to breach our circle and put his hands on Indigenous women. He put his hands on me," another protestor said.

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Talks between Wet’suwet’en and Canadian state won't produce a quick fix

quote:

On Thursday, Coastal GasLink agreed to pause pre-construction work on Wet’suwet’en territory for two days to allow for talks, and the RCMP have agreed to stop patrols and pull out of a mobile detachment nearby. The hereditary chiefs met with federal Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett on Thursday, with plans to meet with her B.C. counterpart, Scott Fraser, on Friday.

In the longer run, however, a reconciliation between the two sides seems more difficult: the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs’ want a permanent halt to the pipeline, but the B.C. government has been unwilling to stop the project. And the federal government would like the solidarity blockades to end, something the hereditary chiefs have said they won’t ask other nations to do.

Though sparked by Coastal GasLink, the Wet’suwet’en solidarity movement has also tapped into an older anger that can be traced back to the founding of the Canadian state.

Nearly every aspect of life as an Indigenous person in the country is regulated by either the colonial Indian Act or a piece of Canadian law that followed, a profoundly frustrating way to live, said Tara Williamson, an Anishinaabe/Nehayo scholar and research fellow with the Yellowhead Institute, a think-tank focused on Indigenous self-determination.

There are fundamental truths at play.

Canada’s foundation and continued existence relies on land stolen from Indigenous peoples. It relies on broken treaties that were supposed to create a nation-to-nation relationship⁠ and on the occupation of unceded territories where no agreement even exists. And it relies on the trauma inflicted by those processes, then and now.

People living on scores of First Nations reserves continue to live under boil-water advisories, despite election promises from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Youth suicides are a longstanding crisis in Indigenous communities, as are higher levels of poverty and violence.

Sean Carleton, an assistant professor at Mount Royal University who studies the history of Indigenous-settler relations, said the battle between the Wet’suwet’en and the backers and supporters ofCoastal GasLink is a repetition of an old pattern. It usually goes something like this, he said: Canada wants something. Indigenous people want to negotiate. Canada doesn’t like it and uses force to get its way.

If political leaders don’t want the same processes to play out again and again, they need to try something different and form real nation-to-nation relationships, he said.

“We've seen conflict after conflict transpire in a very predictable way,” he said. “Learn from it so that we don't have to do this again.”....

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Alderville First Nation Chief Dave Mowat and Council have issued a statement declaring their full support for Wet’suwet’en.

The statement reads as follows:

Alderville First Nation Chief and Council declare our full support for the Wet’suwet’en hereditary leaders and peoples and the struggle in protecting their aboriginal title and land base. In 1997 the Delgamuukw decision brought down by the Supreme Court of Canada provided an in-depth account of aboriginal title claimed and proven by the Wet’suwet’en and Gitxsan peoples in British Columbia. This case is critically important and is a core element in this current dispute. Aboriginal title is not a fiction, it is not simply an inconvenience for those corporate and political agendas that help drive the erosion of aboriginal lands, of natural resources, literally of biodiversity. It is real and must be understood and respected or any hope for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s reconciliation agenda is dead.

The history of Alderville First Nation is in part one of encroachment and the imposition of colonial law designed to break the back of the people. We too have had our immense struggles in holding on to and protecting our rightful place, our lands, and presence in society. Our voices historically have been silenced too often. As a result, we fully support the voice of the Wet’suwet’en and the requirement of their full, free, prior and informed consent not only over the natural gas project occurring at present but for all such projects that stand to impact their lands. Anything less is unacceptable because to reiterate, their aboriginal title is real and intact!

Chief and Council also respect the concern and the focus our membership is placing on this issue, and in our young people for your willingness to engage and stand up in support. This is a turning point in Canadian history, and we are all a part of that history. We also ask that peaceful expressions of support be employed (in all instances across Turtle Island), and that education and the understanding of aboriginal title remain at the centre of that support. Learn it, discuss it, express it in a way that educates and informs. By not losing sight of this and by understanding its critical importance in this struggle the collective voice of Alderville First Nation shall be heard loud and clear alongside the Wet’suwet’en and all Indigenous people!
Chi Miigwech
The Chief and Council of Alderville First Nation

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Nishnawbe Aski Nation..The Rally in Support of Land Protectors and Rights Holders

Meegwetch to @FWFN1 Chief Collins, Elders, drums, and community members for standing up for the peaceful assertion of the rights of Indigenous peoples. @gcfiddler 

NDPP

Palmater: Clearing the Lands Has Always Been At The Heart of Canada's Indian Policy

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-clearing-the-lands-has-a...

"...Now referred to as Indigenous reconciliation, the goal is still the same: to clear the lands of Indigenous peoples in order to boost settlement and extraction of resources. This singular focus formed the basis of the violent colonization of Indigenous lands and peoples and, ultimately, is why Canada has been found guilty of genocide by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Canada's complex set of laws, policies, practices actions and omissions have created an infrastructure of violence toward Indigenous peoples and the continued dispossession of their lands.

We must be honest about what is going on..."

 

#SovereigntyIsTheAnswerCanadaIsTheProblem  #Decolonize  #landback  #ThePeoplesUnitedCanNeverBeDefeated  #MMIWG  #WetsuwetenStrong  #Tyendinaga  #RiseUp

NDPP

'The News Reports What The RCMP Says, Not What They Really Do. The Lies Continue...'

https://twitter.com/Gidimten/status/1233146703991230464

"At 8:53 am this morning, the RCMP was seen patrolling the Morice Forestry Road, breaking the agreement with Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs to withdraw RCMP during talks with the Federal and Provincial Governments. Solidarity Actions continue across Canada demanding full withrawal of RCMP..."

Trudeau/Horgan: Why Are You Breaking An Agreement You Made? 

[email protected]    [email protected]

#RCMPout  #JustinLies #EcocideIsGenocide  #NoTreatyNoJurisdictionNoPipelinesNoRCMP  #WetsuwetenStrong #SovereigntyIsTheAnswerCanadaIsTheProblem  #ShutDownCanada  #thetimeisnow

NDPP

Listuguj Railway Blockade In Solidarity With Wet'suwet'en Land Protectors

https://twitter.com/angelharksen/status/1233180320058531841

'If they arrest us, they arrest us.' - Hereditary Life Chief Gary Mettalic

 

Bruce Clark: Occupiers' Justice, Canada's Broken Constitution And Ongoing Genocide

https://dissidentvoice.org/2015/11/occupiers-justice-canadas-broken-cons...

"...The Trudeau government that took offiice on Nov4th, 2015, has no greater task than that of mending Canada's broken constitution, ending the dark era of occupiers' justice and establishing Canada as a constitutional democracy under the rule of law. The genocide must be admitted so that reconciliation based upon the whole truth can occur. It must show that there can be no 'perfect crime' in a constitutional democracy under the rule of law even when - especially when - the legal establishment itself is the criminal."

Updated with Addendum and Letter from Life Chief Gary Metallic: Notice to Trudeau (Nov. 2015)

Dear Mr Trudeau,

Second notice is hereby served to Canada whom you represent, that our 17th District, Gespegawagi Hereditary Tribal Council and its families whom we represent, will in no way be legally bound by any agreements that are finalized and signed regarding Indian Act associated Mi'kmaq self-government and the Comprehensive Land Claims process.

Canada and its federally created Band Councils under the Indian Act are for legal purposes one federal body. How then can Canada negotiate with itself in extinguishing our Aboriginal titles to our ancestral lands? Who represents our Aboriginal land titles guaranteed under the Royal Proclamation of 1763? For all legal purposes, it cannot be the Indian Act Band Councils because they were created in the late 1800s, and being an extension of Canada, they are in a profound conflict of interest..."

 

#UsurpationIsGenocide  #SovereigntyIsThe AnswerCanadaIsTheProblem  #Listuguj  #WetsuwetenStrong  #landback #NoJusticeNoPeace  #StopThatTrain  #thetimeisnow

NDPP

The Full Release from the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs earlier today. They are meeting with federal and provincial ministers today and tomorrow for preliminary talks after RCMP and CGL agreed to withdraw from the Morice Forest Service Road. (Feb 27, 2020)

https://twitter.com/ricochet_en/status/1233193198597656578

"The Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs have invited Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Premier John Horgan to Wet'suwet'en Territory to meet. However, both have declined at this time. Therefore the Hereditary Chiefs have agreed, as a first step, to meet with Ministers Bennet and Fraser from federal and provincial governments on Wet'suwet'en territory this Thursday and Friday.

The Hereditary Chiefs have agreed to this meeting due to the agreement by the RCMP to stop all patrols on the Morice Forest Service Road, the closing of the CISO outpost, and that Coastal GasLink (CGL) ceases all work and security patrols on the Upper Morice as a demonstration of good faith to create breathing room for these upcoming conversations.

The Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs thank our supporters for their tireless dedication and now the Chiefs need time to have discussions with BC and Canada in an atmosphere of wiggus (respect)*. The Hereditary Chiefs have committed to keep the road free of obstructions for the passage of Wet'suwet'en people and their guests without interference..."

*Should there be any further disrespect, as the refusal to meet by Trudeau and Horgan would seem to be, please advise immediately so that the appropriate corrective measures can be applied promptly to encourage a more receptive and sensitive attitude towards these critical preliminary exploratory talks. Again it has become clear, that when dealing with the Canadian and BC governments, more stick than carrot seems to produce the best results. All those who support you in this important endeavour for Indigenous sovereignty and environmental sanity, wish you the very best wishes in your dealings with our difficult corporate-servile , colonialist governments and their representatives. Perhaps you'll have better luck than the Canadian people do at getting them to do the right thing. In the meantime we'll be keeping the barricades warm...Wiggus!

Dear Justin Trudeau and John Horgan: Don't fuck it up this time or there will be hell to pay we promise. And you WILL meet with these Chiefs anon too. Or your political futures end. You choose. We promise.

[email protected]      [email protected]

 

#Wiggus  #WetsuwetenStrong  #SovereigntyIsTheIssueCanadaIsTheProblem  #NoTreatyNoJurisdictionNoPipelinesNoRCMP  #EcocideIsGenocide  #NoJusticeNoPeace  #Decolonize  #MMIWG  #Solidarity  #HealingOurNationsOfUnitedResistance #thetimeisnow

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Wet’suwet’en Territory, February 27th, 2020

We are seeing many pre-emptive and presumptive news reports, erroneously confirming that we have come to an agreement with the RCMP and the state. Before talks had even begun, mainstream and right wing media was reporting an end to the discussion, seeking to quell dissent and silence support for our position.

We confirm that discussions have begun today, but the terms of the discussions have yet to be determined and agreed upon.

We have not yet received, as a gesture of respect from the RCMP, the written confirmation that our demands will be met and upheld while discussions are ongoing, nor that discussions will continue after February 28th.

Please stand by and watch our pages and that of Gidimt’en Checkpoint for progress and updates. We thank you for your continued solidarity and support in this pivotal and stressful time.

Media Contact:

Freda Huson
[email protected]

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Indigenous civil rights blockades should be met with a new diplomacy, not violence

Canada is at a critical crossroads. The Wet’suwet’en conflict brings us to a deciding moment in Canada, one that will shape the future of the nation. The divisive conflict is about land, Indigenous law, human rights and the nature of civil disobedience.

quote:

The national support for the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs includes the support of an increasing number of First Nations and non-Indigenous Canadians from coast to coast to demand the removal of the RCMP presence on Wet’suwet’en territory.

Indigenous resistance to encroachment on their own lands is being viewed as unlawful rather than as a conscientious act of civil disobedience, similar to historical figures like Rosa Parks, M.K. Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. Peaceful demonstrations by Indigenous Peoples and allies are acts of conscientious objection to laws that need to be re-examined if we are to move to peaceful co-existence, joint resource governance and wealth management.

Indigenous protesters and allies are standing up against unjust laws by making injustice visible to a larger public.

Increasing numbers of non-Indigenous people are demonstrating their support for the hereditary chiefs across Canada. Those people have been viewed by the premier of Alberta as creating “anarchy”, and by the leader of the Conservative Party as needing to “check their privilege” rather than as people of conscience engaging in the right to protest.

quote:

Since the hereditary chiefs did not sign the agreements signed by the band councils, Coastal GasLink did not meet the standards of Articles 18 and 19 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), which affirms that “states shall consult and co-operate in good faith with Indigenous Peoples through their own representative institutions.”

Chief Alexander McKinnon from Nak'azdli First Nation, one of the elected band chiefs of the twenty band councils along the pipeline route, told CBC that in his community three councillors voted for the pipeline and three against it.

Chief McKinnon decided to vote in favour of the agreement despite a community referendum in which 70 per cent voted against the pipeline. He said his reasons for signing included both pressure from Coastal GasLink as well as his intention to ensure his community would have a voice on environmental decisions.

quote:

As an increasing number of Canadians stand together with Indigenous peoples to support reconciliation and the rights of Indigenous Peoples, we must look at this as a civil rights movement.

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Jams for the Land: Fundraiser for the Gidimt'en Yintah Access

Felicita's Campus Pub

3800 Finerty Rd, Victoria, British Columbia

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Canada Lays Bare the Lie it Calls “Reconciliation”

The Canadian state today is in the throes of a historic crisis of its own making, as it stands off against the Wet’suwet’en Nation, an Indigenous nation in northern British Columbia (BC) that is blocking construction of the Coastal GasLink (CGL)1 pipeline through their land (called the Yintah). The CGL pipeline would bring fracked gas from northwestern British Columbia to a planned LNG Canada liquid natural gas terminal on the BC coast at Kitimat that is to be built by an international fossil fuel consortium.2 Condensate, a byproduct of the fracking, will also be used as diluent needed to send tar sands oil through another planned pipeline, the TransMountain Expansion pipeline.

quote:

In many locations, standing injunctions and preemptive injunctions have been used to clear protests, but these have continued to be organized. Early on February 22, Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) moved in on the Tyendinaga railside encampment, but in response, a number of other blockades and occupations sprouted across the country. The mobilizations show no sign of ending soon.

Seeking to discredit the Wet’suwet’en traditional government and their supporters, the coordinated messaging of colonial governments and ruling class media has centred on disingenuous arguments that the Wet’suwet’en are “divided” – therefore the colonizer must decide! Some Indian Act bands on the pipeline route have consented to the project, but the traditional government of the Wet’suwet’en has not. And while the Ottawa-imposed Indian Act administration of the Wet’suwet’en may support the pipeline, its remit does not run to title and rights, which are the purview of the hereditary chiefs, a fact that Canada and BC know well. Nevertheless, despite lacking consent, the NDP-Green government of the province of British Columbia decided to plough ahead with the project, issuing all permits required and ante-ing up $5.35-billion in direct subsidies alongside a federal tax break of $1-billion. Courts granted injunctions against the Wet’suwet’en, once again deeming resource extraction of greater importance than the well-being and wishes of Indigenous communities.

For fractions of Canada’s ruling class, this carbon extraction project is a matter of economic and political urgency. In elite political circles, Alberta’s perennially offside politics are suddenly being framed as a national unity crisis of the highest importance, allegedly requiring both the federal government and Alberta to desperately expand Alberta’s carbon export capacity at any cost in order to address Alberta’s economic crisis, which is largely the result of collapsing demand for its expensive and dirty petroleum output. Large sums of money, including public pension fund monies and private capital, have already been committed to these heavily subsidized fossil fuel projects.

quote:

Recognizing Indigenous Title and Rights – and upholding FPIC – are Canada’s only way out

Yet despite all Canada’s attempts and its endemically Orwellian rhetoric on Indigenous rights, Indigenous Peoples are still here. Today as a result of the internet and social media, Indigenous people and nations are networked across Canada and North America. Decades of movement building and grassroots education and organization have laid the groundwork for today’s resistance. Indigenous intellectuals and journalists can now disseminate their message through social media and independent media, even while mainstream media continue to reflect the blinkered perspectives of their tiny social world. Younger generations who are cutting their teeth on climate change activism also understand solidarity more fluently, and are very conscious of Indigenous rights and the colonial character of the settler state.

This has resulted in an uprising that is the nightmare of Canada’s security state and political and economic elites, one they cannot get out of until they own up to the choice before them and reckon with what they have so far willfully postponed. There can be no “reconciliation” until Canada “gets over it” and breaks with colonial domination and theft as its core policy toward Indigenous people by recognizing Indigenous title and fully implementing UNDRIP, including the essential principle of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent. •

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'Revolution is alive': Canada protests spawn climate and Indigenous rights movement

Since a police raid on an Indigenous territory at the start of February, a wave of civil disobedience has surged over Canada.

Mohawks in Ontario and Quebec have erected rail blockades that paralyzed passenger and freight travel on some lines. Other protesters – Indigenous and non-Indigenous – have followed suit, blockading tracks across the country. Thirty-seven people were arrested in Toronto this week for standing on commuter tracks during evening rush hour, paralyzing the city’s Union Station.

Social media has lit up with fiery rhetoric over the climate crisis and Indigenous rights. Street marches have filled cities and towns across the country with the sounds of beating drums and chanting voices.

The movement has amassed an unprecedented array of allies at home and abroad. Greenpeace has thrown its weight behind this anti-pipeline, pro-Indigenous rights movement – as have independent groups as far afield as San Francisco and London.

The protests are dialing up the pressure on the prime minister, Justin Trudeau, who came to power promising both to repair Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples, and to make meaningful environmental policy changes.

Now people are calling his bluff. “Reconciliation is dead, revolution is alive,” protesters shout – the mantra of a burgeoning Indigenous rights movement.

quote:

The response from the Mohawks – thousands of miles across the country – was immediate and uncompromising, perhaps because they had lived through something similar.

In 1990, the Mohawks of Kahnawake and Kanesatake near Montreal participated in a 78-day revolt known as the Oka Crisis, over the planned expansion of a golf course on to a burial ground. For the Wet’suwet’en, the pipeline is the latest flashpoint in a decades-long fight over their exclusive rights to traditional territory, which at one point went all the way to Canada’s supreme court.

Though there are parallels between the two revolts, Diabo said the Wet’suwet’en movement has gained broader appeal because at its core, it is about Canada’s doublespeak on the environment.

Just six months ago, hundreds of thousands of Canadians joined climate strikes, including Trudeau himself – despite the fact that his government continues to pursue massive fossil fuel projects.

“We’re still debating the environment versus the economy,” Diabo said. “So it’s about their title and land rights – but this goes to the broader issues about Canada’s approach to climate change.”

quote:

Quebec’s premier, François Legault, even claimed without evidence that Kahnawake Mohawks had stockpiled AK-47s – an accusation swiftly denied by the Mohawks, who said Legault was trying to “incite a response”.Alberta, meanwhile, has proposed legislation that would jail pipeline protesters for up to six months and issue massive fines starting at $1,000 a day.

Glen Coulthard, an associate professor in the University of British Columbia’s political science and First Nations and Indigenous studies departments, and a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation, said governments are working hard to paint protesters in a negative light “to render these movements as insignificant – the acts of outside agitators – in order to discredit the broader issues being raised”.

But the participation of non-Indigenous people is critical to the Wet’suwet’en movement, said Diabo, adding that many Indigenous groups have stayed silent for fear of losing federal funding.

Sylvia McAdam, a founder of the Idle No More resistance movement and a University of Windsor law professor, as well as a Cree from Big River First Nation in Saskatchewan, said the participation of so many non-Indigenous people was heartening.

“Whether you’re protesting water [contamination], whether you’re protecting land, whether you’re speaking about white supremacy – those are all symptoms of the core issue,” McAdam said.

quote:

Successive Canadian governments have called for “reconciliation” with Indigenous peoples, but Coulthard argues that such calls have been little more than PR cover for land grabs and business-as-usual.

“Reconciliation attempts to create a business climate that is conducive to investment and legal jurisdictions that will facilitate non-Native economic development on Native land,” he said. “You’re seeing it fail. We’re witnessing it in real time.”

As the climate crisis becomes a top concern for a majority of Canadians, the Wet’suwet’en resistance movement represents an important shift in the country, said Coulthard.

“Canadians are recognizing that, in words and deeds, it’s Indigenous peoples who have demonstrated themselves as concerned about the environment and our long-term wellbeing. Canada sure hasn’t done that. The provinces sure aren’t doing it.

“So they’re getting behind people who have both stated historically – and have demonstrated right into the present – that they’re willing to take those obligations they have to the land seriously.”

quizzical

still at it i see. let's only listen to the smattering of Wet'Suwet'en voices  you wanna hear. grrrr

 

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quizzical wrote:

still at it i see. let's only listen to the smattering of Wet'Suwet'en voices  you wanna hear. grrrr

..it's more than a smattering.

..everyone involved in signing on to the pipeline knew they didn't have the authority to do so. knew of the  court decision. knew the hereditary chiefs were opposed. knew of the feasts held since 2011 opposing the pipeline. 

..and then there's this:

Chief McKinnon decided to vote in favour of the agreement despite a community referendum in which 70 per cent voted against the pipeline.

..grrr all you want..your case is weak. 

Sean in Ottawa

The Ipsos poll is very problematic. I have said to people here that I have worked in this area. The way you ask a question is under control of the client and they will do it based on the result you want. It is a real art and in some cases a science.

So you can with some pollsters put in a very biased preamble. This is the most crude. I doubt that Ipsos would accept soemthign too blatant. Subtle preambles can make it through. Another way is how you order the questions. For example -- in this case asking other questions about for example the dangers or implications on the economy can have people thinking what the client wants them to thinkby the time they get the question that you intend to be public. It can even be part of an omnibus poll with another poll on a differetn topic coming first and biasing the results. 

The biggest way to bias the results is to consider how a question will be read and what the opinions might be out there. In this case if you want to show opposition or support to the protesters you would ask a question on this directly. However if you want to imply more opposition you would word it this way. Let me explain: Anyone who oppses the protesters will respond with unfaourable to the question. however, those who support the aims of the protestors but who are concerned about their safety, those concerned about the saftery of the public, those concerned that this is not an effective tactic and will turn people against them, those concerned about impact on the economy, those concerned that more people will abandon rail (enivronmentally better than roads) and damage the environment, those who would have prefered other direct action such as blocking highways -- will all see the protests potentially unfavourably. Some could even misread the question and see the protest unfavourably becuase they consider it outragious that in 2019 they would be forced to protest in this way. The question does not make it clear why they view the protests unfavourably or clarify that they do not actually support the protestors.

These issues will not distort a majority of the answers but a small number they can distort in one direction only if the question is artful. In this case I argue that it is as it is very unhelpful in terms of why but will be used to imply a lack of support. Just think if only 5% saw it in the terms I laid out above you would have a 10% swing from what might be an even split to a strong majority opinion.

At the end of the day polling is an art with serious ethical considerations. All-to-often we would need to know the disposition of the one asking the question (paying the pollster).

This question is the wrong quesiton -- you could have asked: do you support the aims of the protesters? Do you think the protests are justified? or do you think the pipeline should go through Indigenous territory over the expressed position of the Chiefs? Do you think that construction should ahve waited until the  Band councils and Chiefs had found an agreement? Do you think the Federal government ought to have considered the jurisdiction of the Band Council and the Chiefs and negotiated with the correct parties?  All those questions would produce different numbers. The questionned asked would probably produce the worst result from the perspective of the protesters.

quizzical

epaulo13 wrote:

quizzical wrote:

still at it i see. let's only listen to the smattering of Wet'Suwet'en voices  you wanna hear. grrrr

..it's more than a smattering.

..everyone involved in signing on to the pipeline knew they didn't have the authority to do so. knew of the  court decision. knew the hereditary chiefs were opposed. knew of the feasts held since 2011 opposing the pipeline. 

..and then there's this:

Chief McKinnon decided to vote in favour of the agreement despite a community referendum in which 70 per cent voted against the pipeline.

..grrr all you want..your case is weak. 

no actually it's not. but just keep on being a colonizer exploiting their divisions ignoring other Wet'Suwet'en voices and the expulsion of hereditary matriarchs and Chiefs because it aligns with your cause.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

National Student Walkout For Wet'suwet'en

Wednesday, March 4​

Everywhere

quizzical

just as i thought.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

quizzical wrote:

epaulo13 wrote:

quizzical wrote:

still at it i see. let's only listen to the smattering of Wet'Suwet'en voices  you wanna hear. grrrr

..it's more than a smattering.

..everyone involved in signing on to the pipeline knew they didn't have the authority to do so. knew of the  court decision. knew the hereditary chiefs were opposed. knew of the feasts held since 2011 opposing the pipeline. 

..and then there's this:

Chief McKinnon decided to vote in favour of the agreement despite a community referendum in which 70 per cent voted against the pipeline.

..grrr all you want..your case is weak. 

no actually it's not. but just keep on being a colonizer exploiting their divisions ignoring other Wet'Suwet'en voices and the expulsion of hereditary matriarchs and Chiefs because it aligns with your cause.

 

..you don't address the points i've made. you only attack me personally. 

..while it's true i'm a settler i am not a coloniser. i've fought against colonisation most of my adult life.

..in fact, i know that you know who the colonisers and violators of indigenous rights are in this case. canada, bc and cgl. 

bekayne

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

The Ipsos poll is very problematic. I have said to people here that I have worked in this area. The way you ask a question is under control of the client and they will do it based on the result you want. It is a real art and in some cases a science.

So you can with some pollsters put in a very biased preamble. This is the most crude. I doubt that Ipsos would accept soemthign too blatant. Subtle preambles can make it through. Another way is how you order the questions. For example -- in this case asking other questions about for example the dangers or implications on the economy can have people thinking what the client wants them to thinkby the time they get the question that you intend to be public. It can even be part of an omnibus poll with another poll on a differetn topic coming first and biasing the results. 

The biggest way to bias the results is to consider how a question will be read and what the opinions might be out there. In this case if you want to show opposition or support to the protesters you would ask a question on this directly. However if you want to imply more opposition you would word it this way. Let me explain: Anyone who oppses the protesters will respond with unfaourable to the question. however, those who support the aims of the protestors but who are concerned about their safety, those concerned about the saftery of the public, those concerned that this is not an effective tactic and will turn people against them, those concerned about impact on the economy, those concerned that more people will abandon rail (enivronmentally better than roads) and damage the environment, those who would have prefered other direct action such as blocking highways -- will all see the protests potentially unfavourably. Some could even misread the question and see the protest unfavourably becuase they consider it outragious that in 2019 they would be forced to protest in this way. The question does not make it clear why they view the protests unfavourably or clarify that they do not actually support the protestors.

These issues will not distort a majority of the answers but a small number they can distort in one direction only if the question is artful. In this case I argue that it is as it is very unhelpful in terms of why but will be used to imply a lack of support. Just think if only 5% saw it in the terms I laid out above you would have a 10% swing from what might be an even split to a strong majority opinion.

At the end of the day polling is an art with serious ethical considerations. All-to-often we would need to know the disposition of the one asking the question (paying the pollster).

This question is the wrong quesiton -- you could have asked: do you support the aims of the protesters? Do you think the protests are justified? or do you think the pipeline should go through Indigenous territory over the expressed position of the Chiefs? Do you think that construction should ahve waited until the  Band councils and Chiefs had found an agreement? Do you think the Federal government ought to have considered the jurisdiction of the Band Council and the Chiefs and negotiated with the correct parties?  All those questions would produce different numbers. The questionned asked would probably produce the worst result from the perspective of the protesters.

New poll

https://nationalpost.com/news/one-thing-canadians-arent-divided-on-blaming-the-government-for-the-blockades

For the question about the 1 Billion, that's as a "one time" payment.

MegB

Continued here.

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