NDP BC invades sovereign Wet'suwet'en territory, RCMP arrest defenders

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NDPP

Wet'suwet'en Protests: Here's What's Happening Across Canada (and vids)

https://globalnews.ca/news/6558170/wetsuweten-protests-canada-update/

[Ruling class, corporate] tensions remain high across Canada as railway blockades and protests in support of the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs enter a third week. The chiefs and their supporters are calling on the BC government to withdraw permission for the project to proceed. Here's a quick look at what happened across Canada over the weekend - and what we can expect this week.

Meanwhile, supporters of the hereditary chiefs said they had returned to camps along a road leading to a Coastal GasLink worksite. Members of the First Nation have also said they are maintaining the eviction order served to Coastal GasLink to leave their traditional territories..."

SHUT THIS SHIT DOWN! (and vid)

https://twitter.com/KanahusFreedom/status/1229552666088329216

And TMX too!

 

#NoTreatyNoJurisdictionNoPipelines  #wetsuwetenstrong  #ShutDownCanada

Paladin1

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Actually there are so many practical answers that people do not want to hear becuase it breaks down the objections.

Can you answer some of mine for me if I ask?

Quote:
Indigenous people when they point to unresoved land claims they do not ask for the impossible. They ask to be a partner in resource management - to get a share and they ask for social justice and economic justice.

Tell that to the majority of the Wet'suwet'en people and 20 surrounding bands that want the pipeline to go through and the jobs and money that come with it.

But I'm getting ahead of myself. Can I ask a few practrical questions of you?

NDPP

Exclusive Leaked Video of Trudeau 'Freak-Out' At Wet'suwet'en Cabinet Meeting! (and vid)

https://twitter.com/showmekittys/status/1229250628951478272

"Holy shit..!"

Sean in Ottawa

Paladin1 wrote:

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Actually there are so many practical answers that people do not want to hear becuase it breaks down the objections.

Can you answer some of mine for me if I ask?

Quote:
Indigenous people when they point to unresoved land claims they do not ask for the impossible. They ask to be a partner in resource management - to get a share and they ask for social justice and economic justice.

Tell that to the majority of the Wet'suwet'en people and 20 surrounding bands that want the pipeline to go through and the jobs and money that come with it.

But I'm getting ahead of myself. Can I ask a few practrical questions of you?

I do not speak for Indigenous people -- I can only answer questions about my opinions but I will try.

The majority of the nation's people have not said anything. An elected band council who speaks for administration of the Indian Act to deliver social services has agreed. And they did this under economic blackmail and outside of their jurisdiction. This has been explained above in this thread.

The withholding of adequate fudning to Canadian standards for social services and health is dividing the community. 

NDPP

Despite a clearly  expressed national consensus in favour of the Wetsuweten position -  we still have no agreement to halt the pipeline or move it to an alternate route, as suggested by the hereditary chiefs whose pristine territories will be destroyed as a result of the present plan. Let alone recognition of their unextinguished and continuing sovereignty and the consequent illegality of any incusion by Ottawa or Victoria.

(There is no pressing market for either this climate killing methane fracked gas or the equally destructive dirty dilbit from the Trans Mountain project, or any further expansion of the ecocidal Alberta Tar-Sands, via the Teck mine, in any case.) Canadians have an obligation to stop these outlandish environmental disasters.

We still have no removal of the RCMP invasion force from those unceded territories. We still have no meetings with the concerned hereditary chiefs, despite months of requests, with Trudeau, Horgan or indeed any other senior cabinet minister with a mandate to actually effect a solution. What is really going on here?

I believe that the Trudeau regime has decided upon a very cynical negotiating strategy, the same as we see being used against the Ontario teachers by the Ford government. Delay, deny and stonewall until such time as the general public's support of the striking teachers evaporates. Then when the situation has turned truly toxic and the public goodwill evaporates, the tide shifts against the teachers - destroy the strike by 'ordering' them back to work. This is I believe also the Trudeau plan to crush the upsurge of Indigenous sovereignty, force a return to the status quo, and continue Canadian colonial oppression and dominance over Indigenous affairs. This will and must be resisted by all.

The obvious path to a solution is for the government to immediately schedule honourable nation-to-nation talks with the Wetsuweten hereditary chiefs, to discuss compliance with their just demands. Why is this not happening yesterday? Obviously not enough pressure upon the governments to do so. Solution: MAKE MORE!

#EcocideIsGenocide  #NoTreatyNoJurisdictionNoPiplines  #ShutDownCanada 

Talks Now!

[email protected]

[email protected]

NDPP

"Ironically, the surest way to [reconciliation] is to use the almighty balance-sheet. If we can make the cost of ignoring us higher than it is to deal with us, they will deal. That's the Canadian way' - A Manuel-

NDPP

The Current: Wet'suwet'en Protests (CBC Radio)

https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-63-the-current/clip/15761254-wets...

"Today on The Current: In the second week of rail blockades over a proposed pipeline on Wet'suwet'en territory, what should the government do to resolve the stand-off with protesters?"

"...If they were serious about resolving this, the prime minister would have jetted himself out there, as well as Premier Horgan and gone to meet, instead of sending ministers with limited mandates. To me that's not taking it seriously. The heads of government should be there meeting with the Wet'suwet'en nation's hereditary chiefs to get this thing resolved quickly..."

NDPP

"The Prime Minister's lack of leadership is the problem. Justin Trudeau says the relationship with Indigenous Peoples is the most important - but his actions show otherwise. He must come back to Canada and meet with the hereditary chiefs."

https://twitter.com/TheJagmeetSingh/status/1228474916623863808

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..here's the live video trudeau feed 

LIVE: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is speaking in the House of Commons regarding the protests outside the Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory.

Over the weekend, Trudeau cancelled his trip to the Caribbean to meet with leaders there and instead met with members of his cabinet.

Members of the Mohawk territory say they’re not lifting the protest until the RCMP leave the Wet’suwet’en territory.

Rail services has stopped in many parts of the country and the Mohawks of Tyendinaga say they’re not going anywhere until the Wet’suwet’en peoples say they can leave.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..trudeau speech just started 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..trudeau bla bla bla. scheer disgusting, lying, racist rant.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..blanchet hard to hear as translation is overridden by his voice. seems though to be leaning toward a progressive approach.  

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..singh calling trudeau to account.

..singh used the word colonisation but used it in the context of something in the past not current.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..may best speech. it rips conservative and liberal position apart.

"this is a land issue, a title issue, a justice issue and only very incidentally a pipeline issue."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Who’s banking the Coastal GasLink pipeline?

quote:

1) JPMorgan Chase

JPMorgan Chase is the #1 backer of TransCanada Pipelines Ltd., and therefore of the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

JPMorgan Chase is the lead agent on the majority of the company’s loans. TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. currently has four loans worth a total of about $9.8 billion. Two of those, totaling $5.5 billion, were signed in December 2018 and increased the subsidiary’s available credit by two thirds. (We recently wrote up the details of those transactions.) JPMorgan Chase was the lead agent — the bank responsible for arranging the deal and coordinating between TransCanada and its lenders — on both of those new loans. That makes it the lead agent on more than half of TransCanada Pipeline Ltd.’s current credit. It’s also a lender to the company’s other two lines of credit.

JPMorgan Chase is one of two key bond underwriters. TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. issued nine bonds, totaling $9.3 billion, in 2018. JPMorgan Chase was a lead manager — one of two banks directing the bond sale — on eight of those nine transactions.

This makes JPMorgan Chase the #1 banker of TransCanada Pipelines Ltd., and therefore of Coastal GasLink pipeline, despite an Environmental and Social Policy (see p. 17) that expects clients to obtain free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples.

2) Bank of Montreal

Bank of Montreal is the lead agent on two older loans to TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. that add up to about $4.3 billion. It’s also a lender to the two new loans and participated in one 2018 bond sale.

3) Deutsche Bank

Deutsche Bank was the other lead manager, alongside JPMorgan Chase, on eight bonds (worth approximately $8.7 billion) that TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. issued in 2018. The German bank was also a lender to all four current loans.

4) Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce was the sole manager on one of the nine bonds issued by TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. in 2018, as well as a lender to all four current loans.

The Canadian bank also advised TransCanada on a November 2018 deal that sums up TransCanada’s backwards direction: the sale of its stake in wind energy facilities in Quebec, to the tune of $630 million, in order to fund Coastal GasLink pre-development costs.

5) 17 other banks

At least 17 other global banks are also supporting TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. in a range of roles on its current lines of credit and recent bond sales. These include: Alberta Treasury Branches, Bank of America, Barclays, Citi, Crédit Agricole, Credit Suisse, Desjardins, Export Development Canada, HSBC, Mizuho, MUFG, National Bank of Canada, Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank, SMBC, TD, and Wells Fargo.*

bekayne

NDPP wrote:

Despite a clearly  expressed national consensus in favour of the Wetsuweten position 

Source?

NDPP

I'm far from a fan of any of them, but Elizabeth May's contribution to this debate was far superior to Trudeau, Scheer or Singh's.  Meanwhile Justin Trudeau continues to dodge the first step of any possible solution: the necessity of honourable nation-to-nation talks between himself and the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs. His continuing refusal to accommodate their repeated requests for such talks has become manfestly insulting not only to Indigenous peoples but to all who genuinely seek a just solution to this crisis. If he can meet with oligarchs in Davos or warmongers at NATO, surely he can and should meet with the Wet'suwet'en.

[email protected]

Sovereignty Is The Issue - Canada is the Problem

NDPP

bekayne wrote:

NDPP wrote:

Despite a clearly  expressed national consensus in favour of the Wetsuweten position 

Source?

NDPP wrote:

Open your eyes and smell the coffee.  But as always, present company excepted.

bekayne

NDPP wrote:

bekayne wrote:

NDPP wrote:

Despite a clearly  expressed national consensus in favour of the Wetsuweten position 

Source?

NDPP wrote:

Open your eyes and smell the coffee.  But as always, present company excepted.

This coffee strong enough for you?

http://angusreid.org/coastal-gaslink-wetsuweten/

wet'suwet'en protest angus reid

NDPP

I think I already know, but only fair to ask: Which side are you on?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Letter of Support of the Unist’ot’en Camp

The Vancouver Secondary Teachers Association (VSTA) is writing in support of the Unist’ot’en Camp near Houston, BC.  We are concerned about the unjust treatment of the Wet’suwet’en people by the Federal Government’s use of the RCMP to forcibly remove them from their unceded and traditional lands.  The Provincial Government of British Columbia, as well as the Federal Government have both committed to uphold the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.  Article 8.2.b of the Declaration states that “States shall provide effective mechanisms for prevention of, and redress for any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing them of their lands, territories or resources.” The treatment of the Wet’suwet’en people is in direct contradiction to the aforementioned article.

Canada has made a solemn commitment to reconciliation and as Public School teachers, in light of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, we have been tasked and honoured with the duty of working towards building relationships between settlers and Indigenous people.  The only way that our nation will ever be able to achieve true reconciliation is by treating all Indigenous peoples with respect, which includes respecting their rightful claim to protect their territory.  We call upon your government to its promise and commitment to the TRB Calls to Action as well as the United Nation’s Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..elizabeth may on power play.

Link

Sean in Ottawa

bekayne wrote:

NDPP wrote:

bekayne wrote:

NDPP wrote:

Despite a clearly  expressed national consensus in favour of the Wetsuweten position 

Source?

NDPP wrote:

Open your eyes and smell the coffee.  But as always, present company excepted.

This coffee strong enough for you?

http://angusreid.org/coastal-gaslink-wetsuweten/

wet'suwet'en protest angus reid

Support or opposition to further consultation is probably based on different assessments of what that means.

Everyone supports this consultation as a way forward. However, there are probably a majority who oppose the pipeline supporting this consultation assuming that the opposition of the chiefs will continue. Those in support of the pipeline also support consultation but likely think that the chiefs can be bought off. Once we move forward this will be reconciled and new lines will be drawn either in support or opposition.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

What's really illegal? The defence of unceded Wet'suwet'en territory or provincial permits for Coastal GasLink pipeline?

quote:

I asked Huson what she wanted to tell our readers. The first words that came out of her mouth was that she was not a "protester".

"I'm following Wet'suwet'en law by occupying my land," Huson declared.

She went on to describe how the province had "mismanaged every resource extractive industry that ever hit our territories".

Her father's territory was polluted by seepage of acidic waste from the Equity Silver Mine. This peaked in the 1980s and continued for many years after that.

"They had a breach of a tailing pond where [people in his] territory did salmon fishing," Huson said. "They can't hunt there anymore. And it's still not cleaned up."

That led to subsequent fights by the Wet'suwet'en against another mining project. 

But the highest-profile battle has been over the Canadian state's attempt to create an energy corridor through unceded Wet'suwet'en territory.

First, there was Enbridge's Northern Gateway project, which was eventually vetoed by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after various court battles.

Next, there was an attempt to push through the Pacific Trails pipeline, which would have delivered fracked natural gas to a Chevron LNG plant in Kitimat. Chevron is not proceeding, so that pipeline project appears to be dead.

The latest pipeline project is being advanced by Coastal GasLink, which is owned by TransCanada, New York–based KKR, and AIMCo, which manages Alberta public-sector pension funds.

quote:

Meanwhile, Tait declared that Wet'suwet'en laws would never support a project as destructive as the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

"We’re just in too delicate a position at the headwaters of the Wedzin’kwa [Bulkley and Morice rivers]," she said at the time. "Our whole society is structured around our salmon runs and access to our territories. So it’s at odds with our values.”

In a commentary on Straight.com, Unist'ot'en legal counsel Kate Gunn and Bruce McIvor wrote that the Supreme Court of Canada has concluded the province's issuance of permits—like the ones for the Coastal GasLink project—"is not based on established legal authority".

"It is based on the fact that the Province has proceeded, for over 150 years, to make unilateral decisions about Indigenous lands," Gunn and McIvor wrote. "The fact that the Province has acted since the 1860s as though it has full authority to decide how Indigenous peoples’ lands are used does not make doing so legal or just."

NDPP

That Is Why We #StandWithWetsuweten

https://twitter.com/Weasel_Woman/status/1229433741874876417

"When I was a kid, my grandma (now 96) taught me about the Japanese Internment in 1942. The Canadian government and RCMP took my family from their home and imprisoned them for the next four years. It was all 'legal' but it was wrong..."

#NoTreatyNoJurisdictionNoPipelinesNoRCMP  #LANDBACK  #StandWithWetsuweten  #thetimeisnow

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..while at the center of the struggle is as may puts it "this is a land issue, a title issue, a justice issue and only very incidentally a pipeline issue." the legal issue is being won by wet'suwet'en. governments and corporations are resorting to brute force. this will not get them far today as there is a larger struggle happening on a global scale.

..in canada climate justice has, as i've said many times, is the banner that most struggles are uniting under. the struggle re corporate domination, the destruction of the enviroment, neoliberal austerity policy. this climate justice is united with the wet'suwet'en and other indigenous struggle like tmx and the tarsands project. one of the main reasons other than the justice issue is the ability of the indigenous folk to force the powers that be to the table. to shut down canada. no other sector in canadian progressive society has that ability. 

..there will be no agreement coming from consultaion in the wet'suwet'en matter because we are at a crossroads. at the root of it is power/capitalism needs to extract and control everything and politicians are their puppets. vs the 99% who cannot continue to exist under those conditions.   

..there is maybe a possibility that another route is chosen and that maybe canada and bc will give even more cookies to the lng project. but this will not end the struggle nor the players involved. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Thomas King asks: What do whites want?

What do Indians want? Great question.The problem is, it’s the wrong question to ask.

quote:

But I’d just as soon forget the question entirely. There’s a better question to ask, one that will help us understand the nature of contemporary North American Indian history. A question that we can ask of both the past and the present.

What do Whites want? No, it’s not a trick question. And I’m not being sarcastic. Native history in North America as writ has never really been about Native people. It’s been about Whites and their needs and desires. What Native peoples wanted has never been a vital concern, has never been a political or social priority.

The Lakota didn’t want Europeans in the Black Hills, but Whites wanted the gold that was there. The Cherokee didn’t want to move from Georgia to Indian Territory (Oklahoma), but Whites wanted the land. The Cree of Quebec weren’t at all keen on vacating their homes to make way for the Great Whale project, but there’s excellent money in hydroelectric power. The California Indians did not ask to be enslaved by the Franciscans and forced to build that order’s missions.

What do Whites want? The answer is quite simple, and it’s been in plain sight all along.

Land.

Whites want land.

Sure, Whites want Indians to disappear, and they want Indians to assimilate, and they want Indians to understand that everything that Whites have done was for their own good because Native people, left to their own devices, couldn’t make good decisions for themselves.

All that’s true, from a White point of view, at least. But it’s a lower order of true. It’s a spur-of-the-moment true, and these ideas have changed over time. Assimilation was good in the 1950s, but bad in the 1970s. Residential schools were the answer to Indian education in the 1920s, but by the 21st century, governments were apologizing for the abuse that Native children had suffered at the hands of Christian doctrinaires, pedophiles and sadists. In the 1880s, the prevailing wisdom was to destroy Native cultures and languages so that Indians could find civilization. Today, the non-Native lament is that Aboriginal cultures and languages may well be on the verge of extinction. These are all important matters, but if you pay more attention to them than they deserve, you will miss the larger issue.

The issue that came ashore with the French and the English and the Spanish, the issue that was the raison d’être for each of the colonies, the issue that has made its way from coast to coast to coast and is with us today, the issue that has never changed, never varied, never faltered in its resolve, is the issue of land. The issue has always been land. It will always be land, until there isn’t a square foot of land left in North America that is controlled by Native people....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Power and Force in Canada: Wet’suwet’en Blockades and Occupation

Defenders and Leverage

Blockades and ‘illegal’ occupations are akin to labour strikes, in the sense that they hold hostage the priority of authorities in this country: productivity.

Note that the sovereignty of Indigenous nations has been repeatedly violated, especially in provinces like B.C. where most land, including big cities, is unceded. Legal precedents such as the Supreme Court ruling on Aboriginal title in the same area, affirms the use and occupation of unceded land as a validating Aboriginal title. However, the courts are a Canadian legal system, and although activists use them for legal disputes any legal ruling is one step abstracted from the human experiences.

To clarify, the legality is compelling and our legal system a legitimate authority. Our courts will need to increase clarity in moving forward. Reconciliation is largely dependent on the legal system recognizing Indigenous grievances as legitimate; from the missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and two-spirited people to disproportionate police violence.

That said, the injunction to remove Wet’suwet’en people from the pipeline route being enforced could have been the end of the story. But it is not, because of the blockades and occupations that halt productivity, so suddenly the Prime Minister decides that the issue is important enough to remain in the country.

Surely the left-wing block in B.C. would have still had marches in support, and some government officials would have reaffirmed their dedication to reconciliation. Eventually, the issue would be added to a long list of examples to be cited in political discussion.

It is only with the leverage that the momentum continues. Every relevant official in this country knows that there are consequences to ignoring the problem.

It is difficult to make the case that if the Mohawk blockade in Bellville was not so economically consequential the Minister of Indigenous Services would still be negotiating with them as equals. “There’s a lot more work to be done, and I have a few messages I need to go back to the prime minister with,” contributed to a public response that takes them seriously, in a way that land defenders in Wet’suwet’en territory were not afforded.

In short, movements like the Black Civil Rights or labour rights are successful when they find good leverage, and Wet’suwet’en self-governance is no exception. So, how do authorities respond?

At Gunpoint

On February 7th, 2020, a media account of the Gidimt’en clan posted a video showing four land defenders on a structure, asking an officer to stop pointing a gun on them.

The gun appears to be a rifle and can be seen pointed directly at the camera that one land defender is holding. Also in the video, some of the other police are speaking to what appears to be a media member with sound equipment.

One land defender says “They are making the media leave because they do not want them to see them pointing their gun at us. I have nothing, please take down your weapon,”.

This situation ended without loss of life, and the RCMP’s statement implies that there never should have been a concern in the first place.

 “The ERT member did not point the firearm at any protestor during the operation. The riflescope has a large objective lens which allows the viewer to observe people or objects without pointing a rifle at anyone,”.

This explanation is highly contested. The officers had binoculars. The police vastly outnumbered the land defenders, which appeared to be unarmed. The person who has the gun pointed directly at him was filming from a place with good visuals of officers, so it is reasonable to assume that they could see him and assess the risk the person posed.

So why use a firearm as a tool to look at someone?

“... it was unknown whether there were any other persons inside the structures of the camp area. Police officers cannot simply assume there are not threats in situations such as this,” an RCMP officer is quoted saying.

Hunting rifles are not uncommon in the area so it is reasonable for police to consider that risk but the same land defender quoted earlier explicitly states that he “is of no harm,” to the officers. It is also reasonable to assume most Canadian’s want to live in a country where their police only point guns at civilians when there is an imminent threat, and in this case, that threat is questionable at best.

So why make a public statement excusing the use of a firearm as a tool to look at someone?

The RCMP says "this was the most suitable and only piece of equipment to quickly and effectively observe the persons at the scene," and claims that as soon as it was established that there was no threat, the officer switched to binoculars.

This explanation ignores the real relationship between police violence and Indigenous communities; at the very least it is poor optics. When officers are sent to peacefully enforce something, it is intuitive that appearing to point a gun at someone is not de-escalation.

And that is a charitable explanation, because if it really was an honest mistake then when the optics were pointed out to the police, there should have been some reaction. It was clearly pointed out by the person pleading with the officer to not point his gun at him, in real-time, and there is no evidence that even one of the many officers there acknowledged the concern, or changed the practice. Likewise, the RCMP statement doubles down on the practice.....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..more from the above piece. horgan argues that this lng pipeline was started before the adoption of undrip so doesn't apply. maybe another route means undrip would apply. 

quote:

Alternative Pipeline Routes

When the Office of the Wet’suwet’en suggested another route that Coastal Gas Link could take for its expansion, it was declined in 2014. This was for numerous logistical reasons -the pipeline length would be increased and be closer to urban areas- but also for environmental reasons. Yet another route was suggested, this one going through land that had already be damaged with flooding, but this proposal appeared to be ignored, and has not been mentioned in the court injunction or correspondence made public. Other routes have been brought up and dropped as well, which you can read more about here.

One thing that is repeatedly cited by Coastal Gas Link for not using other routes is that new consultations would arise, new environmental assessment work would happen, and costs would increase.

Basically, it would be incredibly inefficient to not use this pipeline route. But should efficiency trump the constitutional right that Indigenous people have to their unceded land?

Keep in mind, British Columbia ratified the UNDRIP in 2019. In ten years as B.C. continues to evolve its Indigenous policy, what then will be done after the land occupiers have long moved away because they were forced out by police? In later court cases, will the fact that there are no Indigenous Nations exclusively using this land ironically be used as evidence that it is not of the Aboriginal title, even though occupiers were forced to leave?

History has taught us that when you institutionalize a practice, it is very hard to undo, even if we as people change.

Perhaps it is time to stop and take the less efficient route in order to build a better nation in the long term.

Sean in Ottawa

Epaulo, if you consider the point that "whites want land" which I think is a fair analysis there is a scary trend here. With global warming there was a recent statement that much of the arctic in the next few decades can grow food. You can consider that the land the whites were less interested in -- Northern land, that Indigenous peoples were forced on to --  is now under threat.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/climate-change-farming-1.5461275

Go to the cited article and look at the maps.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..sean i'm interested only what is going on related to this thread. i will not follow your link even if your point is legit which i don't know. i'm really trying to stay focused. 

kropotkin1951

Paladin1 wrote:

But I'm getting ahead of myself. Can I ask a few practical questions of you?

Here are the answers to most of the questions you could possibly have. A sort of FAQ file.

Settlers use a number of strategies to maintain the colonial status quo, including distorting or dismissing the past, doublespeak and deceit, divide-and-conquer politics, paternalism, invoking a singular “rule of law,” and, of course, violence and coercion. Our hope is that by exposing some of the discursive tactics in the settler playbook – and putting them in historical context – we can help settlers to see these “moves to innocence” for what they are. As well, we want to show that settlers can choose how to respond in these moments. Instead of treading the familiar paths of colonial hubris that have led to so much pain and damage, we invite settlers to recognize the limits of our knowledge and experience and to listen to Indigenous elders, youth, scholars, and knowledge keepers. In the case of the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, their calls are clear: the RCMP must leave their territory and the Coastal GasLink project must pause for nation-to-nation negotiations.

http://activehistory.ca/2020/02/exposing-the-settler-playbook-responses-...

 

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Kanesatake Mohawk grand chief faces backlash after calling for end to rail blockades

A small group of Kanesatake Mohawks locked out the grand chief and his council from the administrative office of the First Nations community near Oka, Que., Tuesday — angry at the elected leader's pleas for an end to blockades that have paralyzed rail traffic across the country.   

Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Otsi Simon took part in a news conference in Ottawa Tuesday morning, alongside the Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde and other First Nations chiefs.

At the news conference, Simon said he was "pleading with the protesters" to bring down the blockades that were set up as an act of solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs in B.C. who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline project running through their traditional territory.

A blockade in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, near Belleville, Ont., has shut down CN Rail in eastern Canada, and a blockade in Kahnawake, Kanesatake's sister community on Montreal's South Shore, has interrupted Canadian Pacific services that run through the territory.

"Have you made your point yet? Has the government and industry understood? I think they did," Simon said.

"Bringing down the blockades doesn't mean that you surrender. It doesn't mean we're going to lay down and let them kick us around. No, it would show compassion."

quote:

Legitimacy of band councils questioned

A key issue in the crisis in Wet'suwet'en is the divide between members of the elected band council, many of whom support the pipeline project, and hereditary chiefs, who oppose it.

The legitimacy of elected band councils, a creation the federal government set out in the Indian Act, is contested in many First Nations communities, including in Kanesatake.

While Simon's leadership has been called into question before, Harding said the issue this time involves his failure to consult the community before issuing the call for blockades to come down.

"He spoke as if that was the community's position. But that's not true. It's not like that at all," Harding said. "That's not our way of governing."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Update from Wet’suwet’en chiefs meeting. Discussions by phone with @Carolyn_Bennett happening. Ministers wanting Mohawks to stand down. Chiefs adamant that meetings will only happen after Rcmp leave territory, all charges dropped, cgl adheres to eviction. #Wetsuweten #bcpoli

Link

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

[email protected]

I’m a Hereditary Chief from the Fireweed Clan of the Wet’suwet’en People. We are all here to create change. Get on it!!

We have NOT MET with @Carolyn_Bennett or with @scottfraserndp. We will not talk to them until the RCMP are out of our lands and until CGL permits are pulled and they adhere to our eviction notice.

....

Carolyn Bennett

Today I sat down with Min @ScottfraserNDP to talk about finding a peaceful resolution to the blockades across the country and other issues arising from the concerns of Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs. See our statement below.

Link

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Taiaiake Alfred

I was at a meeting of leaders and members of all political groups in #Kahnawake last night. There is strong solidarity with the #Wetsuweten hereditary chiefs in opposition to #CGL, and broad support for the actions that have been taken in support of @Gidimten and #Unistoten

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Atiya Jaffar

FYI CN was planning to lay off workers well before railroad blockades. Making this announcement now was a strategy to villainize #WetsuwetenStong demonstrators.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

For a more in depth look at what's at the center of the dispute - which has resulted in blockades and demonstrations across the country in support of Wet'swuwet'en hereditary chiefs - we speak to a former superior court judge, who is now indigenous rights lawyer.

Link

NDPP

Despite deliberate attempts at confusion and misdirection by msm and those in the 'Canada camp' including 'friendlies' like Serge Simon, the position of the Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs of the territories involved have been made quite clear. There will be no negotiations until the RCMP invasion/occupation force first vacates the territories. 'We will not negotiate with a gun to our heads', said one of the Chiefs.  This position is understood and  supported by the Tyendinaga solidarity action and others across Canada.

The non-native governments are again playing games to try to erode public support while making no serious attempts to come to grips with the threshold Wet'suwet'en issue of police removal. Only once this necessary condition is met, can serious and honourable nation-to-nation negotiations begin. Unfortunately it appears the Prime Minister of Canada has not yet decided to treat this matter with the seriousness it so obviously deserves. He should.

[email protected]

#EcocideIsGenocide  #WetsuwetenStrong   #SovereigntyIsTheIssueCanadaIsTheProblem  #thetimeisnow

NDPP

Here, now it's official:

Breaking: "Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chief Woos on PnP says Hereditary Chiefs will NOT meet with federal or provincial government ministers until they tell the RCMP to leave. We will ask Marc Miller if the government is prepared to do so..."

https://twitter.com/VassyKapelos/status/1229894826419724290

Minister Miller responded to this question put several times to him with a veritable word-salad of imponderabilia and circumlocution - 'maybe so maybe no' etc etc for which our reprehensibles I mean representatives are famous. Clearly they haven't yet got the message but there it is clear and plain from Chief Woos so perhaps they best get right on to implementing that and pull out the pork tout de suite!

#EcocideIsGenocide  #Wetsuwetenstrong  #thetimeisnow

NDPP

PnP: Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs Want RCMP Off Their Land Before Talks With Ottawa

https://youtu.be/LuQjKyBD2ew

"...We're all decided we will not not talk with ministers, we will not talk to governments, until the RCMP is completely off our territorial lands. Until we see that I don't think there will be any talks at all.  We've made it loud and clear we're not going to talk with a gun pointed at our heads. That's not the way we do it..."

#SovereigntyIsTheIssueCanadaIsTheProblem   #EcocideIsGenocide  #WetsuwetenStrong  #StopThatTrain

Aristotleded24

We keep hearing about RCMP staff shortages in detachments across the country. I wonder if Mounties stationed in BC have been pulled away from front-line policing in smaller communities?

NDPP

Statement of Solidarity For Wet'suwet'en Land Defense - 'RCMP Off Wet'suwet'en Land'

https://twitter.com/KamloopsArchaeo/status/1229901767191564288

"The Skeetchestn Indian Band [Secwepemc Nation] stand in support and solidarity with Wet'suwet'en Hereditary Chiefs and Unist'ot'en Camp as they act peacefully to protect their unceded territories from unwanted exploitation and militarized intervention.

At the heart of the conflict created by Canada, BC and Coastal GasLink is the unjustified infringement of Wet'suwet'en rights and title, which are upheld by the Canadian Constitution, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Delgamuukw decision. We unequivocally support Wet'suwet'en title-holders' right to withold their free, prior and informed consent for this pipeline, their traditional lands and governance.

What is happening in Wet'suwet'en territories affects all of Canada. We stand with Wet'suwet'en in condemning the actions of Canada, BC and Coastal GasLink, which bring dishonour to both the Crown and industry, and endanger reconciliation between Indigenous peoples and the Canadian state. We call on Canada to immediately withdraw the militarized police presence and uphold their responsibilities under Canadian and Wet'suwet'en law."

In solidarity

Chief and Council of the Skeetchestn Indian Band

NDPP

RT - So obviously Hereditary Chiefs working for Putin..?

 

Pipeline Resisters Shut Down Key Rail Routes Across Canada

https://youtu.be/5tH3JN5GByA

"Canadian PM Justin Trudeau has summoned an emergency meeting of his cabinet after protesters shut down key rail routes across the country. The demonstrators want to stop a vast proposed gas pipeline over Indigenous territory in northern BC..."

NDPP

"We have NOT MET with Carolyn Bennett or with Scott Fraser NDP. We will not talk to them until the RCMP are out of our lands and until CGL permits are pulled and they adhere to our eviction notice."

https://twitter.com/smogelgem/status/1229908284309528576

 

Do not be fooled by the political 'good-cop' v 'bad-cop' theatre whereby JT becomes the great white champion and protector of the Indigenous right to protest, versus Andrew Scheer's RCMP goon-squad solution. They are both ultimately working for Canada and its energy oligarchy. Don't be fooled. Especially by Justin 'Handsome Harper' Trudeau. Maintain or increase pressure upon the governments for these preparatory conditions to be met, so that honourable nation-to-nation talks can go forward to resolution and a recognition of Indigenous sovereignty over their unceded lands. These politicians will only do the right thing if we force them to.

#EcocideIsGenocide  #NoTreatyNoJurisdictionNoPipelinesNoRCMP  #WetsuwetenStrong  #thetimeisnow

NDPP

February 18, 2020, Prime Minister, Opposition Leaders Make Statements on Rail Blockades (and vid)

https://www.cpac.ca/en/programs/house-of-commons/episodes/66157041

https://www.cpac.ca/en/programs/question-period/episodes/66141852

Mumilaq Qaqqag, Nunavut, NU @54:00

"The federal government has ignored or threatened our well being and very existence as Indigenous peoples. How can we talk of reconciliation when the federal government has stolen our lands?

An excellent question, no?

NDPP

'We Cannot Allow Foreign Corporations To Come Into Our Territories and Violate Our Laws'

https://twitter.com/allan_cranshaw/status/1227454438195040257

"Judy Wilson, Secretary Treasurer of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs speaks to thousands at the BC Legislature in support of the Wet'suwet'en..."

#EcocideIsGenocide  #WetsuwetenStrong  #landback  #thetimeisnow #SovereigntyIsTheIssueCanadaIsTheProblem

NDPP

Toronto Rally For Wet'suwet'en - Saturday, February 22, Noon - 3 PM - Queen's Park 

RSVP  https://www.facebook.com/events/656788928409775/

Rally, Walk, Round-Dance, Family Friendly, Indigenous-led: ALL OUT For Wet'suwet'en!

"Are you concerned about what is happening in Wet'suwet'en? Do you want to show your support for Indigenous defenders, climate-justice and clean water? This is the time to come out and join thousands in Toronto as we unite in support of the Wet'suwet'en.

Reconciliation does not take place when a gun is pointed at you. Remove the RCMP Immediately From Wet'suwet'en Land. NO PIPELINES Without Consent. Hands Off Land and Water Defenders. Bring your loved ones, your friends, and your colleagues to participate in this historical moment.

If you are Indigenous, please go to the Inner Circles of the Round Dance and the Front of the March.

SEE YOU On Saturday!  HELP US MAKE THIS HUGE!!!

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