Turley: ""10 Reasons the U.S. Is No Longer the Land of the Free"

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contrarianna
Turley: ""10 Reasons the U.S. Is No Longer the Land of the Free"

A worthwhile article by Jonathan Turley
Professor of Public Interest Law, George Washington University

The "10 Reasons the U.S. Is No Longer the Land of the Free"  elaborates on the following points in  his article here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jonathan-turley/constitutional-rights_b_12...

Assassination of U.S. citizens
Indefinite detention
Arbitrary justice
Warrantless searches
Secret evidence
War crimes
Secret court
Immunity from judicial review
Continual monitoring of citizens
Extraordinary renditions

There are some who will always say either "it's just the same old, same old", or "exaggeration", but the very real movement towards an updated, old-style totalitarian police state in the US makes the changes itemized here (and more) a new reality.

The Joe McCarthy era, despite the witch hunting fervor, the blacklists, and the destruction of livelihoods is, by comparison, a golden age of civil liberties. 
In my opinion there will be no Edward R. Murrow or an effective lingering media/public adherence to civil liberties and justice to make the necessary correction to the now institutionalized criminality.

In Canada we can tick off the various descriptions here that currently apply to Canadians by default, and others that are in the wings due to political, corporate, military, security and media harmonization with the US.

contrarianna

Obviously, when I said "the golden age of civil liberties" I did not include the greater state of oppression of minorities which the civil rights movement of the sixties and later improved.

contrarianna

Soon to become Number 11:
Impending web censorship under the guise of anti-piracy, etc.

http://rabble.ca/babble/international-news-and-politics/internet-censors...

Fidel

Q:  Which is the largest jailer nation in the world?

A. Iran
B. Saudi Arabia
C. Libya
D. Egypt
E. United States of America

It's not even close..............

Canada adds United States to list of countries that torture

milo204

the US was never the land of the free...just because someone says it doesn't make it so.  

NDPP

It's the End of the World! Again! And Again! And Again!  -  by Arthur Silber

http://powerofnarrative.blogspot.com/2012/01/its-end-of-world-again-and-...

"In my view the most criitical paragraph in Turley's article is this one:

'An authoritarian nation is defined not just by the use of authoritarian powers, but by the ability to use them. If a president can take away your freedom or your life on his own authority, all rights, become little more than a discretionary grant subject to executive will.'

That's the authoritarian state we live in NOW...

Politics, certainly politics in the modern State, is about control, force and violence. Politics is not going to save you. It never was.."

contrarianna

milo204 wrote:

the US was never the land of the free...just because someone says it doesn't make it so.  

Part of the "just same old, same old" camp?

Well, no. Every state is a mixed- bag of tyranny and freedoms. The current U.S, mixed-bag is clearly more full of vipers of tyranny than the past, for reasons outlined by the article above and expanded on by constitutional commentators and others.

contrarianna

 Reason #12:

The expanded, and now openly accepted, model of news media as mouthpiece of govenment propoganda.

Arthur Brisbane and selective stenography

By Glenn Greenwald

http://www.salon.com/2012/01/13/arthur_brisbane_and_selective_stenograph...

contrarianna

Reason #13:

The expansion of "Inverted Totalitarianism"

This is rather an explanation of the structural changes and conditions which have given rise to most of the changes outlined in the opening post article.

Reading the following 2003 article by Sheldon Wolin, who coined the term, we can see even in that in the short time since then  how much deeper and farther the institutions of government have moved to excuse, and codify in law, the new tyrannies.

Inverted Totalitarianism

Sheldon Wolin
May 1, 2003

http://www.thenation.com/article/inverted-totalitarianism

Dostoyevsky

milo204 wrote:

the US was never the land of the free...just because someone says it doesn't make it so.  

what a useless statement - at least give some comparison throughout the 19th and 20th centuries to countries you feel were more free or explain why the belief caught on around the world that the USA was the land of the free even though according to you that was untrue.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

I'm outraged at this video...

 

 

FEMA COFFINS! PROOF OF FEMA CAMP PLANS!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My tax dollars paid for this: I want a red one...Frown

Maysie Maysie's picture

Dostoyevsky wrote:

explain why the belief caught on around the world that the USA was the land of the free even though according to you that was untrue.

First of all, that belief did not, in fact, catch on around the world.

Second, never mistake good PR for reality.

And finally. Slavery of Africans and ongoing racism against African Americans. Systemic genocide against Native Americans. Treatment of so-called illegal Mexican immigrants. 

Daily human rights atrocities are as American as apple pie.

Bacchus

Actually it did, at least in the 19th and early 20th century.  Which is why refugees/immigrants from the old world fled there, beliefing there was no class setup. And willingly enlisted and fought in the Civil War, WWI and WWII.

 

Doesnt mean it was true, given the "
dogs and Irish keep off the grass" signs and whatnot.  But it was believed

Maysie Maysie's picture

My view of "around the world" is a bit broader than the UK, Bacchus. Wink But I see your point.

As for the "land of the free" bullshit:

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

Quote:

Jarvious Cotton cannot vote. Like his father, grandfather, great-grandfather, and great-great-grandfather, he has been denied the right to participate in our electoral democracy. Cotton's family tree tells the story of several generations of black men who were born in the United States but who were denied the most basic freedom that democracy promises-the freedom to vote for those who will make the rules and laws that govern one's life. Cotton's great-great-grandfather could not vote as a slave. His great-grandfather was beaten to death by the Ku Klux Klan for attempting to vote. His grandfather was prevented from voting by Klan intimidation. His father was barred from voting by poll taxes and literacy tests. Today, Jarvious Cotton cannot vote because he, like many black men in the United States, has been labeled a felon and is currently on parole.

.....

As a criminal, you have scarcely more rights, and arguably less respect, than a black man living in Alabama at the height of Jim Crow. We have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.

I reached the conclusions presented in this book reluctantly. Ten years ago, I would have argued strenuously against the central claim made here-namely, that something akin to a racial caste system currently exists in the United States. Indeed, if Barack Obama had been elected president back then, I would have argued that his election marked the nation's triumph over racial caste-the final nail in the coffin of Jim Crow. My elation would have been tempered by the distance yet to be traveled to reach the promised land of racial justice in America, but my conviction that nothing remotely similar to Jim Crow exists in this country would have been steadfast.

...

I first encountered the idea of a new racial caste system more than a decade ago, when a bright orange poster caught my eye. I was rushing to catch the bus, and I noticed a sign stapled to a telephone pole that screamed in large bold print: The Drug War Is the New Jim Crow. I paused for a moment and skimmed the text of the flyer. Some radical group was holding a community meeting about police brutality, the new three-strikes law in California, and the expansion of America's prison system. The meeting was being held at a small community church a few blocks away; it had seating capacity for no more than fifty people. I sighed, and muttered to myself something like, "Yeah, the criminal justice system is racist in many ways, but it really doesn't help to make such an absurd comparison. People will just think you're crazy."

....

By the time I left the ACLU, I had come to suspect that I was wrong about the criminal justice system. It was not just another institution infected with racial bias but rather a different beast entirely. The activists who posted the sign on the telephone pole were not crazy; nor were the smattering of lawyers and advocates around the country who were beginning to connect the dots between our current system of mass incarceration and earlier forms of social control. Quite belatedly, I came to see that mass incarceration in the United States had, in fact, emerged as a stunningly comprehensive and well-disguised system of racialized social control that functions in a manner strikingly similar to Jim Crow.

 

Fidel

According to Michelle Alexander, there are more African Americans embroiled in the prison or corrections system today than were enslaved in 1850.

Bacchus

Im not just saying the UK, anywhere is Europe, parts of asia and eastern europe/russia believed it Maysie.

 

Its very well documented.  Scots and Irish just happened to be the first wave. Then jews and other less 'pure' ethnicities from russia fleeing pogroms. Then of course the waves of Italian, balkan, german, austro-hungarian etc fleeing the rigid class structure there.

 

Im not saying it was true, Im just saying it was a world wide belief that led to many waves of immigration

Dostoyevsky

Bacchus wrote:

Im not just saying the UK, anywhere is Europe, parts of asia and eastern europe/russia believed it Maysie.

 

Its very well documented.  Scots and Irish just happened to be the first wave. Then jews and other less 'pure' ethnicities from russia fleeing pogroms. Then of course the waves of Italian, balkan, german, austro-hungarian etc fleeing the rigid class structure there.

 

Im not saying it was true, Im just saying it was a world wide belief that led to many waves of immigration

which is what exacty I said - it was believed around the world.  Which as you mentioned is very well documented and true.