Viva la revolucion! Cuba's 50th anniversary.

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It's Me D

He may not be insulting anyone (except our intelligence), but do we really need to put up with this crap?

CMOT Dibbler

 

Drive out of the capital and one of the most striking aspects of the countryside is how much land has gone to weed.

from here:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7795388.stm 

 This is disapointing.  I thought Cuba had been quite inventive when it came to agriculture.Frown

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 Takes more than combat gear to make a man Takes more than license for a gun Confront your enemies, avoid them when you can A gentleman will walk but never run -Sting, an englishman in new york

a lonely worker

Trolls aside, to me the most important part of the Revolution was the inspiration it has given to millions of the disposed and poor around the world.

 

As Ze correctly said, in Timor-Leste it is the Cuban Revolution that was the inspiration for their own empowerment.

 

CMOT - without the Cuban Revolution the amazing recent progress in Latin America would not be the same. Every leftist leader from Chavez, Lula, Correa to even Lula say this. Cuba broke the myth of empire and inspired the other colonies to do the same.

 

Not only did Cuba successfully resist the American empire it also defeated the apartheid regime on the battlefield of Angola at Cuito Cuanavale (called Africa`s Stalingrad). This victory was the final nail in the regime. 

In South Africa the first nation Mandela visited when freed was Cuba. His words during this visit are the finest summary of what Cuba's Revolution means to so many and why Cuba remains on the top of the neo-lib hit list:

 Speaking in Havana at the traditional July 26 celebration, the ANC
leader told thousands of cheering Cubans that their efforts,
culminating in the unprecedented defeat of South African regular troops
in Cuito Cuanavale, Angola, had marked a historic turning point for
southern Africa, constituting a victory for Africa as a whole.

“That
impressive defeat of the racist army ... gave Angola the possibility of
enjoying peace and consolidating its sovereignty”, he stated. It gave
the people of Namibia their independence, demoralised the white racist
regime of Pretoria and inspired the anti-apartheid forces inside South
Africa, he added.

“Without the defeat inflicted at Cuito Cuanavale our organisations never would have been legalised”, he asserted.

When
he concluded, Fidel Castro observed that Mandela's remarks constituted
“the greatest and most profound tribute ever paid to our
internationalist combatants”.

Despite the current conventional
wisdom, which seems to regard everything socialist and revolutionary as
an anachronism or a mistake, Mandela had only kind words for Cuba.

“The
Cuban people hold a special place in the hearts of the peoples of
Africa”, he began. “The Cuban internationalists have made a
contribution to African independence, freedom and justice, unparalleled
for its principled and selfless character.”

Mandela repeatedly
stressed the uniqueness of Cuba's no-strings-attached aid. “What other
country” he asked, “can show as much selflessness as Cuba has in its
relations with the African continent? How many countries in the world
have benefited from the assistance of Cuban health workers and
educators? What country has ever asked for Cuban assistance and been
denied it? How many countries threatened by imperialism or struggling
for their national liberation have been able to count on the help and
support of Cuba?”

From its earliest days the Cuban revolution
“has been a source of inspiration for all freedom loving people”, he
went on. “We admire the sacrifices of the Cuban people in maintaining
their independence and sovereignty in the face of a vicious imperialist
orchestrated campaign organised to destroy the impressive gains made in
the Cuban revolution.”

The African people, Mandela noted, have
become accustomed to being victims of other countries which “want to
take over our territory or subvert our sovereignty. In the history of
Africa”, he asserted, “there is no other case of a people that has
risen up in our defence.”

Africans have been especially moved
by the Cuban people's commitment to African liberation and to the
systematic elimination of racism worldwide, Mandela said. “But the most
important lesson that you have for us is that, no matter what the odds,
no matter under what difficulties you had to struggle against, there
can be no surrender. It's a case of freedom or death. I know that your
country is experiencing many difficulties now, but we have confidence
that the resiliency of [your people] will overcome these as they've
have helped other countries overcome theirs.”

“You are with us,“ he went on, “because both of our organisations, the Communist Party of Cuba and the ANC, are fighting for the oppressed masses, to ensure those who make the wealth enjoy its fruits ...

“We of the ANC
will always stand with the poor ... and we will ensure sooner rather
than later that they rule the land of their birth; that, in the words
of the Freedom Charter, the people shall govern. And when that moment
arrives, it will have been made possible not only by our own efforts,
but also by the solidarity, support and encouragement of the great
Cuban people.”

  http://www.greenleft.org.au/1991/23/833

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Hasta la victoria siempre

 

 

 

It's Me D

CMOT Dibbler wrote:
Drive out of the capital and one of the most striking aspects of the countryside is how much land has gone to weed.

 

from here:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7795388.stm

This is disapointing. I thought Cuba had been quite inventive when it came to agriculture.Frown

Also from that article:

Education is free right the way through to university and post-graduate level and Cuba boasts one of the highest literacy rates in the world.

The health statistics are equally impressive. All the key indicators from infant mortality to life expectancy are among the best in the Americas. Its doctor to patient ratio is one of the highest in the world.

 

The article also mentioned that Cuba spends $2bn a year on food imports... This is a pretty vague statement as Canada spends over six times that much on food imports, roughly proportional by population... Does the article mean to say net imports I wonder?

old_bolshie

Unionist wrote:

Lovely little article on BBC:

[url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7786082.stm]Reliving  Cuba's Revolution[/url]

Love the refrigerator in that shack-I'm sure Fidel and the boys had power enough to keep their Cervezas cold 24/7 in preparation for the Big LIE/Push.

 

Kindrid wrote:

BTW, it is absurd to point the finger
at Costa Rica for corruption. Corruption is a fact of daily life in
Cuba. The non-elite Cubans do have to bribe in order to get medicine.
Cubans have to use the black market in order to get basic goods that
are widely available in any Latin American nation. Kickbacks have to
be paid to land lucrative jobs in the tourist industry. A common
practice for tourist industry employees is to skim off the stock of
supplies and resell the stolen supplies on the black market

That's quite true-spend some time in Cuba living away from tourist resorts-the kind that the Good Folks from The Soo frequent-and you see a very different kind of a place-one that's as rotten as any third world swamp you could name.

As to Costa Rica I lived there doing Birding Tours years ago and a paradise it ain't-everything is over priced and needs to be paid for, people are avaricious and much given to theft-and that's being polite about things.

 Of course they haven't had the best role models-the Yanquis and Canucks who dominate the tourist trade are some of the most nauseating characters ever to cheat an illiterate

CMOT Dibbler

OK, It's been an inspiration. that still dosen't make it democratic. 

 

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 Takes more than combat gear to make a man Takes more than license for a gun Confront your enemies, avoid them when you can A gentleman will walk but never run -Sting, an englishman in new york

RosaL

Well, I'm sure it has a long way to go and I can't imagine that even Fidel would say otherwise. But I suspect he would mean something different than you do by 'democratic'? What, to your mind, would make Cuba 'democratic'?

p.s. I can't claim the personal experience of the birder. Clearly, he belongs to a different class than I do. 

CMOT Dibbler

 

Stop imprisoning poets and writers, allow other political parties etc.

Again, Cuban social democracy dosen't have to look like Canadian social democracy(unimaginative and unrepresentative) but it does need democracy.

Evo Morales created social democracy in Bolivia without bowing and scraping to the United States and E.U.  I see no reason why the Cubans can't do the same thing, providing the embargo is lifted.    

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Takes more than combat gear to make a man Takes more than license for a gun Confront your enemies, avoid them when you can A gentleman will walk but never run -Sting, an englishman in new york

CMOT Dibbler

 

Of course the U.S. hasn't helped the political situation by imposing a big geezely embargo... 

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 Takes more than combat gear to make a man Takes more than license for a gun Confront your enemies, avoid them when you can A gentleman will walk but never run -Sting, an englishman in new york

CMOT Dibbler

 

 That's quite true-spend some time in Cuba living away from tourist resorts-the kind that the Good Folks from The Soo frequent-and you see a very different kind of a place-one that's as rotten as any third world swamp you could name.

 

How much of that has to do with the embargo?

  No country is entirely rotten.  I'm sure that even in places like Congo There are locations and people that can re-affirm  a person's faith in humanity. 

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Takes more than combat gear to make a man Takes more than license for a gun Confront your enemies, avoid them when you can A gentleman will walk but never run -Sting, an englishman in new york

Kindrid

Quote:
Not only did Cuba successfully resist the American empire it also
defeated the apartheid regime on the battlefield of Angola at Cuito
Cuanavale (called Africa`s Stalingrad). This victory was the final
nail in the regime.

Another great lie of the regime. The battle of Cuito Cuanavele was
a complete  disaster for Cuban forces in Angola:

 FAPLA (People' Armed Forces for the Liberation of Angola)/
Cuban vehicles and aircraft destroyed by SADF / UNITA forces:

Tanks – 94

Armored troop and combat vehicles – 94

BM-21 / BM-14 14 Multiple Rocket Launchers – 34

D-30 / M-46 field guns – 9

TMM mobile brigade- 7

Logistic vehicles – 389

MIG 21 / 23 aircraft – 9

Helicopters – 9

compared to

SADF equipment destroyed or captured by FAPLA / Cuban forces

Ratel infantry fighting vehicles – 5

Casspir infantry fighting vehicles – 3

Rinkhals transport vehicles -1

Mirage F-1 fighter aircraft – 2 (1 as a result of an accident)

Bosbok light reconnaissance aircraft – 1

Confirmed killed on the Cuban / Angolan side: 4,785

South Africa side: 31 from combat 6 from malaria.

Source “The Days of the Generals” by Hilton Hamann pg 97.

The plan was for Communist forces to wipe out the the UNITA
stronghold at Jamba. They did not succeed but took a terrible
beating. After the battle, UNITA was even stronger flushed with
captured Soviet Block weapons.

Years before the battle South Africa put a deal on the table for a withdrawal and
independence for Namibia in exchange for the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Angola. Castro did not take the deal. He had
fantasies of marching to Pretoria. The result was the wars in Angola
and Namibia dragged on for years. Because of the Communist defeat at
Cuito Cuanavele the Cuban agreed to the deal that South Africa had
proposed years earlier. The Cubans withdrew from Angola and Namibia
became independent.

BTW, the ANC refuse to open up the files regarding the battle of
Cuito Cuanavele. Cubans that now live in freedom confirm and former Warsaw Pact
advisors confirm the South African victory.

The only thing Castro's African adventures did was scare White
South Africans in prolonging apartheid out of a real concern that
majority rule meant a Communist dictatorship. Castro's adventures
painted the whites in a corner. It is no coincidence that apartheid
ended after the fall of the Soviet Union and the fear of Communism
was lessened.

 

 

a lonely worker

Rafael Correa's statement on the Revolution:

 

According to Prensa Latina news agency, in his weekly
radio and television address last Saturday, Correa sent a message of
solidarity to the Cuban people and congratulated them on the
occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution.

The leader said that the triumph of the Revolution in Cuba on
January 1st, 1959, was a turning point in the history of Latin
America and the Caribbean and a break with the traditional social
and economic conditions of the region.

“Perhaps only the independence struggles of the 19th century could
be compared with the Cuban Revolution. Which country of our region
could resist only three months of a blockade by the United States?”
Correa asked.

After recalling that Cuba has resisted for 50 years, he predicted
that the Caribbean nation will be one of the most prosperous
countries of Latin America and the Caribbean once the blockade is
lifted due to its human talent, its technological development and
the social cohesion of the nation.

 

 http://www.cubanews.ain.cu/2008/1229pdteecuador.htm

Fidel

CMOT Dibbler wrote:

P.S. Putting up massive cities incredibly fast is a good thing? 

Maybe not. But China was a fourth world basket case in 1949. The west did not recognize a billion people living in mainland Asia as even Chinese. We did recognize the very murderous Chiang Kai-shek's Formosa though.

And Keynes is not so reviled in China. Today they pay cash on the barrelhead for homes and apartments in China. Personal savings rates are over 25%. Compare that with people in the western world losing their jobs and over-valued homes today as a result of an economic ideology that is failing for the second or third time without anyone pushing it over a cliff by either a cold war or economic warfare. It just doesnt work!

CMOT Dibbler wrote:

 

How much of that has to do with the embargo?

  No country is entirely rotten.  I'm sure that even in places like Congo There are locations and people that can re-affirm  a person's faith in humanity. 

Cubans vote in elections and any Cuban can run for election. Their voter participation rates in Cuba make it look like Canadians may have issues with our own democracy. And as far as the US is concerned, it's a plutocracy for a long time. All two presidential candidates in that country are pre-selected by billionaires and corporate interests. It's not a real democracy though they pretend it is. They have a cosmetic government and a permanent shadow government. And they've tended to interfere in Caribbean affairs and Latin America to extremes in general for many years. And that's the way it is today still.

 What Cubans will not allow are American educated and influenced politicians to run for election in Cuba. They refuse to allow IMF and western world to appoint a central banker to Cuba, who is not born in Cuba, and does not respect Cuban's sovereign interests. That's what's been happening though in other parts of the world - parts of the world where colonial style indebtedness to foreign bankers and rich people living in other countries  takes precedent over the social democratic interests of a nation.

The largest prison population on the island of Cuba is at Guantanamo.

The largest gulag population in the world belongs to the USA.

The largest threat to human rights and democracy on the island of Cuba is at Guantanamo.

And the Congo has 5.4 million fewer people since the late 1990's. That's a holocaust.

Big business interests and western world colonialism in Africa and around the capitalist thirdworld have been the kiss of death for millions of people in recent years.

 

 

Kindrid

Quote:
He may not be insulting anyone (except our intelligence), but do we really need to put up with this crap?

Well if you don't believe me you can read the following: 

 

Cuba: The
Unnecessary Revolution

Adolfo Rivero Caro

What was Cuba like before the Revolution?

By the end of the War of Independence in 1898, Cuba had been in
ruins. As a consquence of the war some 400,000 persons had died,
about one-fifth of the population. The country had lost two-thirds
of its wealth. Railroads, bridges and telegraph lines had been
destroyed. Sanitary conditions were deplorable and the country was
gripped by mortal endemic sicknesses like yellow fever.

"Once upon a time there was a Republic. It had its constitution, its
laws, its civil rights, its President, a Congress, and law courts.
Everyone could assemble, associate, speak and write with complete
freedom. There existed a public opinion both respected and heeded."

Fidel Castro, "History Will Absolve Me" (1953)

* In 1953, almost 57 per cent of the population was urban. More than
1/2 of the population lived in cities of more than 25,000
inhabitants, 1/3 lived in 4 cities of more than 100,000 inhabitants.
One-sixth of the population lived in Havana, third-largest capital
of the world in relation to the total number of the nation's
inhabitants after London and Vienna.

(Cuba: The Pursuit of Freedom, Hugh Thomas

* In the 1950s Cuba had a large middle class: about a third of the
population. Twenty-three per cent of the working class was
classified as skilled.

* The middle class was NOT flanked by powerful landowners or by an
upper class. And there was much social mobility.

* Cuba had the third-highest per capita income in Latin America,
exceeded only by Argentina and Venezuela-between $350 and $550 a
year, probably nearer the higher figure.

*According to a U.S. Department of Commerce analysis (1956), Cuba
was "the most heavily capitalized country in Latin America" and its
"network of railways and highways blanket the country." The country
also had numerous well- equipped ports.

*Per capita consumption of meat was about 65 lbs to 70 lbs a year;
of sugar 50 kilos, exceeded only by England, Australia and Denmark,
and higher than that of the U.S.

* Life expectancy was 58.8 years, while the average for South
America was 56 years.

* Death rate was 6.4 per 1,000 persons and infant mortality 37.6 per
1,000. These figures were among the most favorable in Latin America.
As in Argentina and Chile, two of the top three causes of death were
decidedly "modern": cardiovascular diseases and malignant tumors.
Citizens of most other Latin American nations succumbed to diseases
of poverty such as digestive-system complications, infancy-related
illnesses and respiratory disorders.

"Cuba is one of the countries [of Latin America] where the standard
of living of the masses was particularly high."

Anibal Escalante, leader of the Cuban Communist Party until 1962.

* During the 1950's, Cuban literacy rates were the fourth-highest in
Latin America after Argentina, Chile and Costa Rica.

* Cuba had between sixty and seventy newspapers, eighteen in Havana
alone. The twenty-eight main newspapers claimed a circulation of
580,000. Magazines were important. Bohemia, with a circulation of
250,000, was the most prominent weekly of hispanic America.

* Cuba had more telephones per capita than any Latin American
country except Argentina and Uruguay; more TV sets per capita than
any other Latin American country, and more than Italy; more cars per
capita than any Latin American country except Venezuela.

http://www.neoliberalismo.com/unnecesary.htm

 

Cuba was not some hopeless poverty
banana republic before Castro stepped into power. Cuba had every
chance to become of of Latin America's greatest success story.

Fidel

And the western world waged war on Angola with the help of apartheid South Afreeka and other fascist regimes at the time. Cuban soliders were looked upon as heroes around the world for coming to the aid of desperately poor Angolans facing an onslaught by a vicious empire. Jonas Savimbi was the devil incarnate to many Angolans, but the west embraced him and gave him weapons and aid money. May his blood scream for all eternity. Today their most successful domestic industry in Angola is manufacture of artificial limbs

Fidel

It looks as if "Meet the Friendly Dictators" arent nearly as thoughtful of the Gringos running the vicious empire as some of our newest babblers tend to be:

 [url=[/url]">http://home.iprimus.com.au/korob/fdtcards/Cards_Index.html][img]http://h...

Quote:
FULGENCIO BATISTA

President of Cuba

 

Cuban Army Sergeant Fulgencio Batista first seized power in a 1932 coup. He was President Roosevelt's handpicked dictator to counteract leftists who had overthrown strongman Cerardo Machado. Batista ruled or several years, then left for Miami, returning in 1952 just in time for another coup, against elected president Carlos Prio Socorras. His new regime was quickly recognized by President Eisenhower. Under Batista, U.S. interests flourished and little was said about democracy. With the loyal support of Batista, Mafioso boss Meyer Lansky developed Havana into an international drug port. Cabinet offices were bought and sold and military officials made huge sums on smuggling and vice rackets. Havana became a fashionable hot spot where America's rich and famous drank and gambled with mobsters. As the gap between the rich and poor grew wider, the poor grew impatient. In 1953, Fidel Castro led an armed group of rebels in a failed uprising on the Moncada army barracks. Castro temporarily fled the country and Batista struck back with a vengeance. Freedom of speech was curtailed and subversive teachers, lawyers and public officials were fired from their jobs. Death squads tortured and killed thousands of "communists". Batista was assisted in his crackdown by Lansky and other members of organized crime who believed Castro would jeopardize their gambling and drug trade. Despite this, Batista remained a friend to Eisenhower and the US until he was finally overthrown by Castro in 1959.

 

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Kindrid

Actually UNITA enjoyed wide support among African nation at the
time of independence. The MPLA only took control of the capital
because they were given massive aid from Soviet Block nations. At the
time of independence, if fair elections occurred Savimbi would have
won. Savimbi took the help of South Africa only because UNITA would
have been wiped out without help form Pretoria.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture
Fidel

And Canadian Gerald Bull was in there like a dirty shirt handing advanced cannon technology to the U.S.-backed mercenaries. It tipped the balance of the dirty war. Bull was a stooge for the CIA who would later sell large gun barrel and who knows what else to Crazy George I's and maggie's long-time pal in Baghdad. Fascists are a treacherous bunch of mass murdering bastards when you think about it.

Kindrid

Batista was elected in 1940 with the support of Cuba’s
Communist Party. The US ended all aid to Batista in 1958 and quickly recognized
the Castro government. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kindrid

So, the solution for getting rid of one dictator is to install a
greater dictator? Fidel's body count far exceeds Batista's Castro
promised free elections and a return to the liberal Constitution of
1940. 2 million Cubans did not flee their homes during the rule of Batista.

Fidel

They recognized Fidel when he was in the mountains and threatening their boy with overthrow.Tricky and Einsenhower thought he was just another sonofabitch who'd oppress and dictate and continue working with the mafia. They were wrong. Tricky-D didnt think Fidel rated a cup of tea on his first visit to meet the Americanos. Dicky told Dwight he didnt think they could work with Fidel and that he was a communist. But Fidel did seek recogniition by the US as Cuba's legitimate leader. They turned their backs on Fidel and Cubans in a time of need. The island country was in a mess. 

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Fidel

Cubans worked from sunup  to sundown in the cane fields. They did backbreaking work under the tropical sun for United Fruit and Bacardi and others while their sons and daughters sold their bodies to rich foreigners and mafia crooks. Cubans were fed up with the oppressive US-backed mafia regime in Havana and Batista's secret police.

Unlike American citizens, you are entirely free to travel to Cuba and see the results of the revolution first-hand. They have guided tours of the agricultural industries, education system, and social scene in Cuba. Cuba is not a closed society in the way that many US client states have become. There are no U.S.-backed right-wing death squads running around Cuba. And you can ask Cubans themselves what it was like before the revolution. They'll give you an earful

old_bolshie

Quote:
Cubans worked from sunup  to sundown in the cane fields. They did
backbreaking work under the tropical sun......while their sons and daughters sold their bodies to rich
foreigners

That's a pretty good description of much of rural Cuba today from what I've seen.

 

Of course you have never seen any of Cuba have you?

 

Fidel

old_bolshie wrote:

Quote:
Cubans worked from sunup  to sundown in the cane fields. They did backbreaking work under the tropical sun......while their sons and daughters sold their bodies to rich foreigners

That's a pretty good description of much of rural Cuba today from what I've seen.

Prostitution is older than even you, Ol' bullshie. You'll find it in every major city in the world. Of course, that's something world travelers become aware of early on. Cuba's prostitutes are some of the most well educated working people in the world.

Quote:
Of course you have never seen any of Cuba have you?

So did you and ma 'n pa enjoy Orlando on spring break? Or did you do the cross country thing and hit all the high spots along the way to Anaheim? 

Any new fish recipes?

Visit the folks back in Northern Ontario recently?

 

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