Will Syriza take power in Greece?

384 posts / 0 new
Last post
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Gun to Greece's Head Pulled Away' As Tentative Deal Struck in Brussels

The newly-elected Syriza government of Greece and its creditors from the 19-nation Eurozone have reportedly reached a draft deal for a loan extension to the country for another four months.

The specifics of the agreement, and the conditions imposed on Greece, have not yet been fully revealed to the public, but according to Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)in Washington, DC, the deal represents a "significant retreat" by the so-called troika and "shows that their austerity program, which has failed miserably, is no longer politically enforceable."...

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2015/02/20/gun-greeces-head-pulled-away...

KenS

I think "gun pulled away from their heads" is too strong a statement. 

"This is not a moment for jubilation," said Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis in a press conference. "This agreement is a small step in the right direction."

The gun is still to their heads. The Europeans not pulling the trigger is a repreive for the moment, and maybe a precursor of victory (mostly). But all we know so far is that the gun did not go off.

For all the saber rattling from them, it never seemed likely that the Europeans would force the situation into immediate crisis.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

ken

..i agree the gun is still there. i think though that the europeans have already sent the greeks into immediate crisis which is how we got to this point.

KenS

ok, more pricisely:

immediate heightened crisis is what could have been touched off yesterday [and might still be]

josh

This could just last till Monday when Greece is supposed to present the "reforms" they're willing to implement.

I understand that Syriza is, in part playing for time, hoping others in and out of the EU will pressure Germany to be more flexible, but if I were them I would strike while the iron is hot. There's no guarantee their popularity at home will be as high four to six months from now as it is now.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..txs ken. and a wee bit more info on the deal with video. eta cross posted with josh

Greece gets its deal.. But if the detail’s wrong ‘we’re finished’

The eurozone and IMF have done a deal with Greece, extending its bailout for four months in return for a commitment to run all policy measures with significant economic impact past the lenders. The second part of the deal has to be done on Monday, by Greece submitting a list of proposed measures....

http://blogs.channel4.com/paul-mason-blog/greece-deal-details-wrong-were...

...

Greece Eurozone Deal a Setback or Tactical Win for Syriza?

Heiner Flassbeck says Germany is asserting a destructive agenda proven to be driving Europe into recession

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&I...

KenS

josh wrote:

This could just last till Monday when Greece is supposed to present the "reforms" they're willing to implement.

There will be many iterrations of Greece presenting how they propose to dealing with the "conditions"- essentially, how much they are willing to compromise to keep the bailout alive. Then the paymasters say what is not acceptable. Then another round. Etc.

So it will not be all over on Monday. That is when Greece makes its first 'presentation' / bargaining position.

And of course, there is all sorts of back of stage wheeling and dealing that makes the stages of those itterations even more nebulous and fuzzy.

I guess I think of it as a protracted negotian until there is either agreement or permanent collapse. seems to me it could be either a lot shorter than the 4 month term, or a lot longer, with one 'temporary' partial agreement just rolling into another with another term, albeit called something different.

KenS

josh wrote:

I understand that Syriza is, in part playing for time, hoping others in and out of the EU will pressure Germany to be more flexible, but if I were them I would strike while the iron is hot.

The only thing the government can do unilaterally is reject all the debt, become an international pariah, and see what happens when the drachma is brought back.

NO ONE questions that will be wrenching for all Greeks. And there is no unity at all, and therefore no mandate, about going straight there. So there is a question about whether "striking while the iron is hot" means anything.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

KenS wrote:

ok, more pricisely:

immediate heightened crisis is what could have been touched off yesterday [and might still be]

..sorry for the delayed reaction. my point wasn't just about correct language. the europeans as i see it have already created the crisis that is pushing greece out of the union. now they want to crush the decent if they can. they will go to the wire believing they can get away with it so don't consider if greece leaves or not. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Troika, Grexit or Plan B?

quote:

There are many commentators, including those on the Keynesian left, who complain that the Germans are being unreasonable and stupid. Giving the Greeks some leeway on public spending and reducing the burden of debt would help restore the Greek economy and keep the European project going in the face of increased scepticism from the electorate of Europe and a stagnating and deflating Euro economy. You see, austerity does not work, so goes the argument.

But the Germans are not ‘irrational’ from the point of view of Capital. The Austerians reckon that European capitalism will not recover unless the capitalist sector is restored to high profitability and the burden of debt is reduced. That means neoliberal ‘structural’ reforms involving primarily decimating the power of labour through anti-trade union laws, increased sacking rights, reducing unemployment benefits and pensions and more privatisations. Alongside this, there must be cuts in public spending and debt to allow cuts in corporate taxation to raise profitability.  Get labour costs down and boost profitability – that’s the way out of this depression.

That is a rational strategy for Capital. The Keynesians, on the other hand, reckon that cutting wages and fiscal austerity just slashes ‘effective demand’, so that more austerity breeds even less growth. In the depth of depression, this argument has some validity, especially in Greece.  But the essence of recovery on a capitalist basis must be a return to profitability and raising wages or spending more on welfare does the opposite...

https://thenextrecession.wordpress.com/2015/02/20/troika-grexit-or-plan-b/

eta:

What’s wrong with both the Syriza leadership position and that of the left within Syriza is that they have put the debt burden and the euro on the front burner rather than replacing failed Greek capitalism at home as the top priority. Whether Greece is in or out the euro will not restore growth and living standards if the capitalist sector continues to dominate in Greece. Greece’ s public sector debt can never be repaid and should be written off as odious. But the cost of servicing it has fallen to low levels already, so writing it off will not alone kick-start the economy.

The Greek government and its people must seize control of the commanding heights of the economy.  That means public ownership and democratic control of the banks and the major strategic companies; the launch of a public investment programme for jobs and growth and an appeal to solidarity within Europe for the Greek alternative against the neo-liberal governments in the Eurogroup. That would probably lead to Greece being ousted from the EU, given the current balance of political forces. But at least the Greek people and the rest of Europe would see why the Euro leaders are doing it and also have a clear alternative plan B to implement...

NDPP

The Assassination of Greece  -  by James Petras

http://www.voltairenet.org/article186806.html

"The leadership of the EU is counting on Syriza leaders abandoning their commitments to the Greek electorate. The issues go far beyond local or eve regional, time-based impacts. The entire global financial system will be affected..."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..time for people everywhere to speak from the streets and squares. the fight is on and greece needs to be protected.

Greece deal is first step on the road back to austerity

The rightwing orthodoxy that dominates thinking in Brussels has asserted itself over the hapless Greeks. A deal that allows the eurozone policymakers, the International Monetary Fund and the government of Athens to keep talking next week is the first stage in a clampdown on anti-austerity sentiment.

That much was clear from the statements coming out of Brussels, not least those from Wolfgang Schäuble, Germany’s veteran finance minister, who indulged himself with some patronising comments to show where the power lies. “Being in government is a date with reality, and reality is often not as nice as a dream,” was the quip he delivered with a smile, one that is usually omitted from diplomacy school.

Greece has many enemies inside the eurozone. The countries that have suffered Brussels-inspired austerity – Portugal and Ireland – and those that have played a role in enforcing it – the Germans, Dutch and Finns – all want the radical leftwing Syriza-led government in Athens to stick with the programme. France and Italy might have been courted by the Greeks and proved reliable allies, but they stand meekly on the sidelines offering warm words and little else...

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2015/feb/20/greece-deal-first-step-o...

NDPP

Varoufakis Keeps Greece in the Eurozone, By Its Fingernails  -  by Mike Whitney

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article41087.htm

"It's not easy to negotiate with a gun pointed to your head...Even so, it's only natural for people to feel let down, especially since Syriza had promised much more than they could deliver."

KenS

It looks like the list of "reforms" Greece has proposed is an expression of what most observors think is happening"

Greece is stll [in practice] saying no to widesrpead ditching of it's domestic promises, and the European Commission is still saying the answer will be no to significant changes to terms of the bailout that Greece's proposed "reforms" would make imposible.

In other words, the end game saw off has been punted ahead for "later".

Greece submits proposed reforms in bid for loan extension

I put reforms in quotation marks because it is one of those terms that turns words on their heads in the new agreement. "Reform" generally means neo-liberal austerity measures. Under the new endless negotatiating "agreement"  "reform" becomes any policy Greece proposes for dealing with the current crisis. IE, following through with social spending promises becomes a reform, the same as is more agressive tax collection from the wealthy, or selected neo-liberal austerity demands that Syriza says it is willing to live with.

Next step:

The European Commission [really still the troika] says that the list of reforms is not acceptable.

And the horse trading continues.

KenS

Syriza does not necessarily have much idea of the end game in these negotiations.

But I can see how this punting ahead of the conclusion is mostly in their favour. [Leaving aside that anything is better than jumping off the cliff right now.]

Syriza can probably count on popular support for holding the line as much as possible. For the European Commission- they definitely have the upper hand [an understatement], but time is not on their side for playing tough guys.

I bet the Germans really wanted to force Greece into making its choice now: surrender, or jump off the cliff. The longer this drags out, the more at risk their tenuous mandate gets.

Thats how it looks to me anyway.

KenS

The major concession Greece appears to have made is to not roll back privatizations. They had to give up something, but that will hurt among supporters.

josh

KenS wrote:

The major concession Greece appears to have made is to not roll back privatizations. They had to give up something, but that will hurt among supporters.

 

Privatizations that have already occurred, correct?

josh

Here's the text.  They promise not to touch privatizations that have already occurred.  There is language in there that implies future privatizations, but that is vague enough not to committ themselves to such privatizations.  A lot of the language is vague, although the statements regarding public worker benefits and pay are bothersome.

 

http://clamo.ftdata.co.uk/files/2015-02/24/GREEK%20GVT%20REFORM%20AGENDA.pdf

KenS

josh wrote:

A lot of the language is vague, although the statements regarding public worker benefits and pay are bothersome.

http://clamo.ftdata.co.uk/files/2015-02/24/GREEK%20GVT%20REFORM%20AGENDA.pdf  

I will use a more clear cut example of how the vague language "operationalizes," but the operative principle is similar with public worker pay.

Closing point of the document: • Ensure that its fight against the humanitarian crisis has no negative fiscal effect.

That will understandably concern people that it is shorthand for "no social spending that Greece cannot afford."  IE, spending that will [predictably] interfere with Greece meeting bailout conditions.

And that is certianly the meaning for European paymasters.

But Greece insists on the Keynesian argument that increased social spending is what is required for the economy to recover and for Greece meet it's repayment obligations [the exact nature of which have not been established].

The Germans and the rest of the reactionaries talk as if Greece must meet the existing bailout terms. And insist that austerity is the only path to get there. But in practice, both of those are dead. That does not mean that the Greek approach replaces that in practice DOA austerity agenda. Not at all. But what does replace the DOA troika agenda is a matter of political contention.

In other words, stay tuned.

Tom Vouloumanos

SYRIZA's aggreement is a short term deal, so the concessions it made were for the 4 month period. It needs to capitalize the banking sector and the short delay was a ridiculous negotiating time frame (February 28th, imposed by the Samaras government to tie Syriza's hands and force it to collapse, this is what the establishment called he theory of the "Left Paranthesis").  Only the ECB could capitalize the banks in such a short period of time, if not people's bank accounts would go POOF! Poeple really need to contemplate that reality when assessing Syriza's performance.    So, Syriza was under the gun, and it had no mandate from the public to leave the euro. Moreover, would people's savings have the same purchasing power if Syriza went ahead with prinring new money? No way.  A Grexit is a complex affair that may cause much short term pain, and people, are not willing to that route, they want to find a solution wihtin the eurozone, they are tired of falling living standards and want to hold on to at least the little money they have in banks. 

The government had little manoeuvering space but did well in taking these baby steps in the opposite direction of austerity.  Schauble and Rajoy were the hardliners.  The former for ideological reasons, the latter because he's terrified of a Podemos victory.  Apparently Merkel was more lenient than her Financne Minister, there was some help from Hollande and Renzi and the European Socialist & Democrats group .  This allowed the SPD leadership to convince Merkel to back a litlle off.  Not a huge victory, but for once there is a discussion at a European level on the value of austerity and its consequences.

Syriza fought hard (there is an approval rating of over 80%, people feel they were honestly working hard on their behalf), and the plan is to fight again as the European situation changes. Syriza needs allies, there needs to be organization at the european civil society level to start turning the tide away from austerity and neoliberalism. Syriza is betting on building those alliances and inching out of austerity. It has not abandoned reversing privatizations, this is a war against neoliberalism, there are many more battles to be fought, until people are free form this tyranny.

The good news is that Syriza will now have the EU backing to go after the wealth of the Oligarchy and its power, what is known as the triangle of sin: The wealthy-the media-the parties.  Syriza's solution to finding money is cracking down on tax evasion, tax shelters, corruption, and clientelism, which has plagued the system for so long. It now has tacit institutional support for doing so.  Merkel needs to explain to her own constituency why she gave the Greeks some leeway.  This is actually a huge implicit victory that hasnt really gotten much attention, but it is what saved Syriza from an internal war and appeaded its left faction.

Here's a good analyis:

httos://zcomm.org/znetarticle/no-syriza-has-not-surrendered/

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Putin to the Rescue?

 

Quote:
The standoff continues, and will be decided tomorrow by EU finance ministers. It's not looking good: Germany has already stated that the Greek proposal "does not meet the conditions". But if the finance minsters don't agree, then what?

You guessed it: Tsipras will turn to Russia. Earlier this month Tsipras and Putin agreed on a range of bilateral ties, including the construction of a pipeline that would carry Russian natural gas from the Turkish border across Greece to the other countries of southern Europe.

This follows the re-routing of the 'South Stream' pipeline, which had been due to cross Bulgaria but was effectively blocked by the EU's retrospective application of energy market rules, under heavy pressure from the USA. Last November and December Putin negotiated the pipeline's realignment across Turkey with Turkish President Erdogan - right up to the Greek border.

Following the agreement between Putin and Tsipras, which came complete with an invitation to Moscow on Victory over the Nazis day, 9th May, the pipeline link to the major countries of southern Europe is now complete, at least on paper. And once it's built, Greece will effectively control - and profit from - that gas supply, and take a strategic position in Europe's energy landscape.

 

Wait, there's more.

Quote:
we could see Greece simply renouncing its manifestly unpayable and unjust €320 billion national debt, and quitting the Eurozone straitjacket - while receiving an emergency liquidity package from Russia to support the launch of the New Drachma.

In fact, we could see a re-run of important elements of the Ukraine play of December 2013, when Russia offered a support package under which it would buy $15 billion in bonds from Ukraine, supporting its collapsing currency, and supply it with deeply discounted gas - £268 per cubic metre rather than the maarket price of $400.

A $15 billion purchase of New Drachma denominated Greek bonds would be a superb launch for Greece's new currency, and would firmly cement Greece's long term alliance with Russia, providing it with a valuable long term bridgehead into both the EU and NATO.

This move would also give inspiration and confidence to progressive political movements across Europe that take inspiration from Syriza's fight for economic justice - in Spain, Portugal, Ireland, Italy, the UK and beyond - and bear the powerful message: there is an alternative.

There is an alternative.

KenS

That Mike Whitney guy... why is it when he talks I keep hearing Beatrice and Sidney Webb ?

Bacchus

Unless the Turks are persuaded to say fuck you to the pipeline, scuppering Greek hopes. But hey its not like the Turks hate the Greeks or the Greeks had been ffucking with the EU application ffor the Turks

KenS

That guy channeling the Webbs talked about the [proposed] pipeline as another stroke of genius by Putin.

Right, investing billions in a pipeline that depends on Greece and Turkey never being tempted to punish each other.

KenS

The link Tom posted above does not work. Here is the article:

No, Syriza has not surrendered

KenS

The link Tom posted above does not work. Here is the article:

No, Syriza has not surrendered

 

Stockholm

According to this article Syriza has folded and is basically just continuing the policies of the rightwing government they defeated

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/greek-bailout-syriza-diss...

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

European Banks vs. Greek Labour

Michael Hudson says Greece's Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis is proposing austerity on the banking class, rather than the working class, to balance the budget

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&I...

Slumberjack

Understanding Syriza

Quote:
Before the elections, Syriza promised to withdraw the patrol wagons and the police special forces units stationed in the area. And indeed, Syriza kept their promises: the heavily armed police forces were moved 200m-300m away! Typically they are not in Exarhia anymore. A few days ago, when a police car was set on fire, the special forces once again invaded the neighborhood, randomly beating up and arresting residents and passers-by. As his predecessors had done so many times in the past, Giannis (Yannis) Panoussis, the new Minister of Public Order, didn’t even place the incident under investigation.

Quote:
Panoussis recently stated that the immigrant detention centers – which are, in fact, concentration camps where thousands of immigrants are kept locked up for up to 18 months without having committed any crime – will become “hospitality centers,” a euphemism the previous government used as well. Syriza will give a humanitarian touch to the State of Emergency and will dress it with a social-democratic cloak.

Quote:
And we shouldn’t forget that Syriza has formed a government with Independent Greeks, a small party which is deeply xenophobic and homophobic.

Quote:
The ruling class now hopes that Syriza can restore politics as a legitimate source of consensus, soothe the protests and divert people’s attention from the capitalist crisis and the transnational commercial war. In a time when the Greek capitalism has gone bankrupt, social peace can guarantee the unimpeded continuation of capital accumulation and the survival of Greek capitalism at the expense of the working class.

Quote:
Contrary to the crowd that gathers outside the parliament, the capitalists know that national independence is achieved by the barrel of a gun both within and outside the country. And this gun is put on the temple of the multinational subversive proletariat.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Greek Reform Proposal Preserves Privatization Commitments, Ignores Debt Restructuring

Dmitri Lascari says these compromises have created dissent within the SYRIZA coalition

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&I...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Stathis Kouvelakis: ‘Going on this way can only mean defeat’

After Greece’s agreement with the European Union – with the aid programme being extended in exchange for the continuation of structural reforms – the new government has arrived at an impasse. The hopes of those seeking an end to austerity have not even lasted a month. Stathis Kouvelakis, member of the Syriza central committee and reader in political theory at King’s College London comments on these developments in the interview below.

http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/1878-stathis-kouvelakis-going-on-this-wa...

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Bacchus wrote:
Unless the Turks are persuaded to say fuck you to the pipeline, scuppering Greek hopes. But hey its not like the Turks hate the Greeks or the Greeks had been ffucking with the EU application ffor the Turks

 

Turkey's 30-year efforts to join the EU cannot be blamed entirely on the Greeks, whether they were bearing gifts or not.

At least one person in Russian media is noting how Turkey has been successful in playing each against all.

Is Turkey Turning Towards a Full Eurasian Pivot?

Turkey has been looking at non-NATO-compatible missiles from China, the recently diverted South Stream with Russia to provide gas to European customers (such as Greece), powerful differences with the US/NATO efforts to use Kurdish nationalism to undermine Syria, no Gezi Park protests by Russia to undermine Turkey (unlike US/NATO countries with "colour" revolution ambitions), SCO dialogue partner, etc.

Perhaps it is a pipe dream but I would love to see Greek-Turkish unity as a means to rip the Empire a new a**hole. And good for Greeks and Turks as well.

Bacchus

Its a pipe dream. The Greeks had Cyprus veto Turkish Cyprus so I dont see any reciprocal goodwill coming along (except disasters, they seem to help each other fofr natural disasters)

KenS

The narcotic in pipe, GloryToPutin, is very potent.

Slumberjack

The Death of Social Democracy

Quote:
After the deal made with the Troika on Friday, it, as Rosa Luxemburg declared its predecessor – revolutionary Social Democracy – is now nothing but a stinking corpse. The constraints of the capitalism world-system, the EU, and the European ruling class have conspired to make all attempts at real left-Social Democratic policies impossible.

Quote:
Returning to Marx, if constructing for the future and settling everything for all times is not Syriza’s (or Podemos, etc.) task, then what is to be done? A party like Syriza – supposedly a “Coalition of the Radical Left” – that wishes to develop radical, even revolutionary class consciousness must be honest with its membership and voters.

iyraste1313

The Death of Social Democracy....

thank you for this...though I may sometimes disagree over strategy and tactics, anyone putting their energy and faith in some social democratic experiment, especially in this day with so total a control by the elites institutions of corporate economy and finance!

Sure tactically this may be useful, given the priority to build revolutionary direct democratic grass roots parallel movement!

Hopefully Syriza´s leadership is aware!

NDPP

'V Is For Varoufakis!' (and vid)

http://rt.com/news/235739-varoufakis-bailout-youtube-video/

ROTFL  bring on the mulcair version!

Aristotleded24

iyraste1313 wrote:
Hopefully Syriza´s leadership is aware!

Surely the leadership knew that dealing with these institutions would be very unpopular with large segments of the party base, and the leadership has done nothing to try and stop disappointed members from speaking out. Makes me wonder if they have some sort of ace up their sleeve they plan to play.

KenS

What kind of ace?

[who needs one?]

You said dealing with the instituions [the Troika] would be unpopular with large segments of the party base. Dealing with them was inevitable. Negotiating with them, instead of ttelling them to get lost, would be uunpopular with A segment of the base, yes. And not a small segment definitely. But 'large' could men to a lot of people predominate or almost predominate or something like that.

At any rate we are not hearing directly or indirectly from ANY section of the Syrriza base. We are being treated to a steady flow of articles from international revolutionary socialists who will HEAVILY try to hitch their wagon onto anything like what is going on in Greece. And a goodly part of the Syriza base is like minded... at least to a point.

The alternative to what the Syriza leadership is doing would be starting to prepare the population for VERY soon repudiating Greece's debt and jumping off into the unknown with bringing back the drachma. What our armchair internationals are really criticizing Syriza for is not showing the leadership to CONVINCE the base that they have to take the hard path.

Because everyone knows that the government does not presently have a mandate for going straight to the hard path, which includes immediate increased suffering for most people in Greece. The HOPE being that after the short term pain....

Granted, the Syriza leadership not only does not have a mandate for the hard path- it is pretty clear that they do not want to go there as long as there is any other option. And, so?

That just means they are pretty much in tune with the majority of the poular revolt- which is after all why they got elected.

iyraste1313

the ace of course is their increasing collaboration with the Asian Alliances....was not Russia the first country any of the key SYRIZA ministers visited, including the Foreign Minister being in negotiation with Putin´s people at the moment the EC was considering their proposals?

Has not the Russian Government already offered cash support, if the Greeks pull out of the monetary union?

But this is not what I had in mind, suggesting some development at the grass roots level.

This is crucial to understand, as well for us, as our own economy continues deteriorating, taking the financial system down, just as is about to occur in Greece and now happening in Ukraine....bank runs and holidays, hyperinflation and foreign capital flight controls, although given the numbers coming out re the Greek banks, this process is well underway there!

I haven´t had the opportunity to investigate re Venezuela, but something which I´m sure Chavez was trying to promote...building a grass roots community based economic system under an anticapítalist money and credit system...

This is what we have to consider also in Canada, before we are reduced to impotence and total state control!

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..what the government/syriza needs is the support of the majority people. this would need to include the decentralization of decision making power. the student demonstrations, the anarchistic struggles defending neighbourhoods and the recent past square occupations suggest the lengths to which people in greece will go to have a say. the processes to consult needs to be on the table from the get go. what i see now is a growing concentration of decision making going to a few in high government positions. and everyone else are left to debate each other on the merits of what is going on. and having a vote next election.

..this has to stop if there is an expectation that people will support syriza. ways have to found to demonstrated that very thing. . many are thinking including me, that there is no staying in the euro or zone without austerity. an exit needs to be organized. there is no need for years of endlessly trying to negotiate with the austerity crowd. and an exit plan that includes the support of the people and working with other anti austerity groups within the union/zone. imho

eta: always in the back of my mind is the posibility of the military stepping in. this thought is tough to deal with when trying to make change. and i can't say that i have any answers but will say that care is needed.

KenS

epaulo13 wrote:

what i see now is a growing concentration of decision making going to a few in high government positions.

Growing concentration compared to what?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

ken

..for starters compared to the reports that 40 syriza mps are petitioning that the central committee be convened to discuss what compromises are being agreed to.

KenS

epaulo13 wrote:

..what the government/syriza needs is the support of the majority people.

There is pretty much no question that Syriza HAS the overwhelming support of the majority.

The question is about where Syriza goes / should go with that.

The bulk of the material here that is put up works from the premise that just about any compromise is a betrayal of the support of the people. Well, that remains to be seen.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..please be specific in your criticisms ken. not all posts are the same and many raise important questions even though betrayal is mentioned. this is an important debate not only for greece but for others all over the world who want understand what is going on. discover what lessons are to be learned even in these early stages.

NDPP

'Relevant Notes on Greece' -  by M Khazin

http://thesaker.is/m-khazin-relevant-notes-on-greece/

"A brief overview of the post-election situation in Greece..."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Greece to stop privatisations as Syriza faces backlash on deal

Greece's Left-wing Syriza government has vowed to block plans to privatise strategic assets and called for sweeping changes to past deals, risking a fresh clash with the eurozone's creditor powers just days after a tense deal in Brussels.

"We will cancel the privatisation of the Piraeus Port," said George Stathakis, the economy minister. "It will remain permanently under state majority holding. There is no good reason to turn it into a private monopoly, as we made clear from the first day.

"The deal for the sale of the Greek airports will have to be drastically revised. It all goes to one company. There is no way it will get through the Greek parliament."

The new energy minister, Panagiotis Lafazanis, warned that Syriza will not sell the Greek state's 51pc holding of the electricity utility PPC, power grid ADMIE or state gas company DEPA. "There will be no energy privatisations," he said....

quote:

Yet the Syriza leadership risks falling between two stools as it tries chip away at the austerity regime without triggering Greece's ejection from the euro. A closed-door crisis meeting of the party at the Greek parliament erupted in an emotional storm, running for 12 hours as the group's Left Platform voiced their anger over the retreat in Brussels.

"A lot of Syriza MPs are very troubled by the deal and they are being pretty open about it. The fault lines are clear," said one MP, emerging for a shot of caffeine.

"We're in uncharted territory and we don't know how this is going to end. But there is a very strong sense that we should hold together come what may. We are not going to split," he told The Telegraph.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/11435649/Greece-to-stop-pri...

josh

A wait and see attitude at this point is a wise one.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

Collecting taxes from the rich and making them face the consequences would solve political, economic, and treaty obligations for Syriza. Syriza needs to start threatening nationalizations.

NDPP

Showdown in Athens

http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/02/27/showdown-in-athens-2/

"A disagreement over the terms of a deal to provide a bailout extension for Greece, has set the stage for a final clash between the Eurogroup and members of the Greek ruling party Syriza.

Varoufakis will not have a 4 month grace period to experiment with his pro-growth, anti-austerity economic policies. He'll be expected to toe the line from Day 1. Varoufakis either doesn't understand what he signed or thinks he can implement his own plan..."

Pages