Criticism of Manitoba Conservative government and Pallister

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Aristotleded24

On to other issues, the Manitoba government has announced the end of birth alerts:

Quote:

The Manitoba government is ending the controversial practice of sending out birth alerts for expectant mothers who are considered to be high risk.

In a release on Friday morning, Families Minister Heather Stefanson confirmed the government will stop the practice effective April 1, saying a review found no evidence to prove birth alerts increase the safety of children.

“To build a relationship with an at-risk mother and connect her with the programs and supports she needs, first we need to build trust,” said Stefanson in the release.

“Birth alerts are having the opposite effect, discouraging moms and families from reaching out at a time when we most want to work with them.

“This decades-old practice will end in Manitoba as part of our commitment to transform the child welfare system and connect families with community-based supports and services.”

I have to give Stefanson credit here. The child welfare system was so broken under the NDP that it seems any change is an improvement from what we had before.

Aristotleded24

Meanwhile, the Dauphin jail is still in the news, this time at the front steps of the Ledge:

Quote:

Dozens of placard-carrying protestors marched Wednesday morning in front of the Manitoba Legislative Building to denounce the planned closure of the Dauphin Correctional Centre.

They gathered in the frigid weather at three entrances — off Broadway, Assiniboine Avenue and Osborne Street — from 7:45 a.m. until 9:30 a.m.

...

Gawronsky said she has been contacted by family members of Dauphin jail inmates. They are concerned that no information has been provided about where those inmates will be moved, she said.

"They're saying to us … 'What's going to happen to them? How are we going to get there to be able to go and visit them?'" she said.

"We have no idea what's going on. No one has talked the families, no one has talked to the inmates and no one has talked to the staff or the community of Dauphin.

"This government is extremely silent."

So after focusing so heavily on the jail guards losing their jobs and the economic impacts on the community, the MGEU is now starting to at least pay lip service to concerns about inmates being away from their families, and also to the idea of building a "correctional and healing" centre. I'd be interested to see what they and the Dauphin community have in mind for a potential new facility.

Aristotleded24

On to other issues now, a report was released on how low wages in child care make it difficult to recruit and retain staff:

Quote:

"When I can have a staff say to me, 'I can go work at Shoppers Drug Mart and make more money than I can working in daycare,'" — Farrow said she is left dejected.

She's tried to convince two employees at her Stars of Promise daycare in northeast Winnipeg to get more training, but they don't see the point.

"They told me: why would I do this when there's no money in this field?" Farrow said. "Why should I come out owing $10,000 or more in student loans, and get peanuts — $15.50 [an hour]."

...

These are big blows to a sector already reeling from a provincial grant that's been stagnant since 2016, and by having parent fees capped by the province since 2013.

"If this government truly believes in their mantra of 'cradle to grave of Manitobans' then a robust and effective child care policy is part of this," Brianne Goertzen, a coalition member, told a news conference Wednesday.

The big issue is that funding for centres has been capped, and the centres are also not able to raise rates. There are calls to allow centres to charge rates based on income, however that sounds too much like means testing to me. It should instead be funded publicly, and those who can afford more can pay higher income taxes. This also after Assinibione Community College is suspending its Distance Education program, again citing funding issues:

Quote:

The college said the pause on registration happened because a subsidy provided by the province for distance education courses has been used up, after enrolment numbers swelled for several distance programs.

"We've exhausted the funds right now," said Karen Hargreaves, dean of health and human services at Assiniboine Community College. 

Students enrolled in distance education for early childhood education, educational assistant (EA) and early childhood program management must now wait until July to register for new courses. It affects 331 students.

Unlike the full-time programs where enrolment numbers are fixed, the part-time distance programs allow for continuous registrations and applications and more time for students to complete each course.

"This is temporary. The program will continue, they'll be able to finish their program, but when you're in a high-demand program sometimes you have to wait to get into it," she said. 

The province is aware of the high demand for the programs, she said, adding that a funding increase would help the school increase capacity.

Aristotleded24

Meanwhile, a PC MLA is under fire for criticizing a proposed breakfast program:

Quote:

James Teitsma, Conservative MLA for Radisson, took to Twitter to share his criticism of the proposed breakfast program, calling it a bad idea.

"Don't get me wrong – kids need breakfast," Teitsma said on Twitter. "But they need to eat breakfast IN THEIR HOME even more."

In a longer post on his website, Teitsma said the breakfast program does not address the root issues in the home.

"We need to understand why the children are not getting breakfast at home and take steps to ensure that they do," Teitsma wrote. "A universal school breakfast program doesn't do that."

Teitsma went on to say, providing a universal breakfast program could discourage and remove the responsibility from parents.

It's not just the financial aspect. Having breakfast together also helps foster community among children. Perhaps more time spent in community without digital distractions would be a good thing.

Ken Burch

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Meanwhile, a PC MLA is under fire for criticizing a proposed breakfast program:

Quote:

James Teitsma, Conservative MLA for Radisson, took to Twitter to share his criticism of the proposed breakfast program, calling it a bad idea.

"Don't get me wrong – kids need breakfast," Teitsma said on Twitter. "But they need to eat breakfast IN THEIR HOME even more."

In a longer post on his website, Teitsma said the breakfast program does not address the root issues in the home.

"We need to understand why the children are not getting breakfast at home and take steps to ensure that they do," Teitsma wrote. "A universal school breakfast program doesn't do that."

Teitsma went on to say, providing a universal breakfast program could discourage and remove the responsibility from parents.

It's not just the financial aspect. Having breakfast together also helps foster community among children. Perhaps more time spent in community without digital distractions would be a good thing.

It makes sense that a right-winger would say that-that part of the political spectrum hates the idea of large groups of people doing things like having breakfast together, or doing anything ELSE together.  That was the whole point of creating the concept of the suburbs-to hive people off into individual compartments so that they will have no reasl shared experience and no real sense of community.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Get Moving on Climate: A Transportation Event

Friday, March 13, 2020 at 6 PM – 9 PM

Dakota Community Centre

1188 Dakota Street

Attend expert-led breakout sessions & participate in discussion on what transportation could look like in a zero-carbon Manitoba!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Manitoba's Climate Action Team wants to Get Moving on Climate! We're here to ask the question: How can we transport people and goods without the use of fossil fuels?

You can join local experts in breakout sessions to discuss:

- Active transportation
- Public transit
- Goods transportation
- Inter-city and rural transit
- Ride and car sharing
- Electrification and automation

Learn what policies need to be implemented to build a resilient future for Manitobans in the climate emergency! We'll talk about what these transportation systems look like in Manitoba and explore how they'll help us meet emissions targets for a zero-carbon future.

Doors open at 5:00 PM

Tickets are on a By Donation / Pay-What-You-Can Basis:

Aristotleded24

epaulo13 wrote:

Get Moving on Climate: A Transportation Event

Friday, March 13, 2020 at 6 PM – 9 PM

Dakota Community Centre

1188 Dakota Street

Attend expert-led breakout sessions & participate in discussion on what transportation could look like in a zero-carbon Manitoba!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Manitoba's Climate Action Team wants to Get Moving on Climate! We're here to ask the question: How can we transport people and goods without the use of fossil fuels?

You can join local experts in breakout sessions to discuss:

- Active transportation
- Public transit
- Goods transportation
- Inter-city and rural transit
- Ride and car sharing
- Electrification and automation

Learn what policies need to be implemented to build a resilient future for Manitobans in the climate emergency! We'll talk about what these transportation systems look like in Manitoba and explore how they'll help us meet emissions targets for a zero-carbon future.

Doors open at 5:00 PM

Tickets are on a By Donation / Pay-What-You-Can Basis:

As an aside, I have to ask how this group came to a decision to have an event like this on a Friday evening, during a time when people are thinking more about socializing than activism? That's probably one of the worst times to have an event like this.

northwestern_lad

Yesterday Manitoba NDP Leader Wab Kinew proposed a universal school breakfast program, a reasonable idea to support a policy that's worked for a long time. To that, Manitoba Premier Pallister responded with blind ideology that just came off as so callous, cruel and immoral. Absolutely blew my mind!

https://magpiebrule.ca/2020/03/05/starving-for-compassion/

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Aristotleded24

And now Pallister is trying to use the budget to force through omnibus bills, which is despicable in any time, but especially during a pandemic. Hey Brian, maybe do what your conservative Saskatchewan counterparts have by introducing a scaled-back budget that is enough to keep the basics going. The rest we can worry about later once this has passed.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Aristotleded24

This is how Pallister deals with housing issues during a pandemic:

Quote:

The budget also signals a shift in the province's role in public housing. The role of the Manitoba Housing and Renewal Corporation will transition from housing provider to becoming a funder and regulator, the budget explains.

"It seems to be working better," Pallister said Thursday, saying there's better maintenance and more available housing stock in the units that have already transitioned to the private sector.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Manitoba seeks to silence Child's Special Allowances clawback challenges

One month ago, the Pallister government introduced Bill 34: the Budget Implementation and Tax Statutes Amendment Act.

One of more than 20 the Manitoba Tories stacked up prior to delivering the 2020 budget, the bill is mostly standard procedure. Part 6, for example, eliminates tax refunds on goods removed from Canada.

Buried under the subsequent avalanche of novel coronavirus news and concern, it sat, until its first reading during an emergency legislative session Wednesday.

Now, Manitobans are learning the potential of its full impact.

Deep in its pages is Part 9 — entitled "Other Amendments" — which proposes to deal with "the federal special allowances for children that Child and Family Services agencies received or were eligible to receive for children in care between January 1, 2005, and March 31, 2019."

This section proposes a radical change that would permanently keep money earmarked for children in care and remove their ability to disagree.

"It’s unprecedented," says Cindy Blackstock, a national Indigenous child advocate and executive of the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada. "No other province is doing anything like it."....

Aristotleded24

Bartley Kives on Pallister's response to the pandemic:

Quote:
At the beginning of April, the premier loosened up the provincial purse strings to provide money to protect homeless people exposed to COVID-19 and to purchase hospital supplies. These are not luxuries, but necessities during a pandemic.

Now, a full month into what's become a disaster for every segment of the economy that doesn't involve streaming video and door-to-door food delivery, the premier's primary concern continues to be the provincial balance sheet.

...

Early on in the pandemic, the premier announced the creation of a volunteer-finder app that seems redundant in the age when most Manitobans tend to multiple social networks.

As of Wednesday, 6,370 people registered to use what could be described as Tinder for volunteers. 

The province also awarded a $4.5-million contract to a company called Morneau Shepell to deliver online therapy to Manitobans suffering from mental-health issues during the pandemic.

Presumably, one large multinational company based in Toronto is better positioned to meet the needs of physically distanced Manitobans than a number of psychologists based in Winnipeg, Brandon, Steinbach or Thompson.

The province also awarded a $4-million contract to homegrown call-centre company 24/7 In Touch to help businesses and non-profit organizations access federal wage subsidies and the Canada Emergency Business Account.

...

Time will only tell whether the fit and feisty Pallister is right to remain relatively idle while Justin Trudeau's Liberals — who have never been afraid of spending money — weave together a pandemic social-safety net.

What a nasty piece of work this guy is. He hasn't lifted a finger to offer any help to Manitoba residents (Manitoba is the only province that hasn't offered anything in the way of direct assistance), pawned off any assistance to the federal government after having picked fights with the Liberals since he was elected, and instead he's wagged his finger and threatened us if we don't adhere to social distancing. Even Doug Ford has managed to somewhat rehabilitate his public repuatation in this crisis. How are you less adept at public relations than Doug Ford?

We have been very fortunate on the covid front here in Manitoba. We never saw a steep rise in infections that other jurisdictions have. We have had several days where no new cases were reported. Most of the daily increases in the case count are in the single digits. We have had no major outbreaks. More people have recovered from this than there are cases currently active. On the current trajectory, it looks as though coronavirus won't leave a big mark on this province. I actually think that the austerity measures this government will bring to balance the budget after this is over are going to do far more damage to this province than coronavirus could ever have done.

Aristotleded24

Aristotleded24 wrote:
I actually think that the austerity measures this government will bring to balance the budget after this is over are going to do far more damage to this province than coronavirus could ever have done.

Looks like I'm being proven correct:

Quote:

Brian Pallister's Progressive Conservative government has told Manitoba universities to figure out how to cut their budgets by as much as 30 per cent in order to help the province survive the financial maelstrom of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Universities, which already have laid off hundreds of employees, contend they're trying to manage increased demands from students at a time when many are out of work. The schools say they don't know how they can operate with reduced funding, never mind prepare the provincial workforce for the post-pandemic economy.

The province gave universities a Tuesday deadline to prepare scenarios for budget cuts of 10, 20 and 30 per cent over the next four months, either by cutting back on their workforces or by reducing other expenditures.

Mr Kinew, it is time to step up to the plate here. Do a daily podcast. Fireside chats. Call a virtual press conference and outline an alternative pandemic plan. Anything, it doesn't matter what it is. We need leadership more than ever, and it's time for you to seriously introduce yourself to the public to show them that things don't have to be the way Pallister says they have to be.

northwestern_lad

This is some of the ugliest kind of politics here from Pallister, seeing a government try to use a crisis as cover for something so reckless, to gut public services and all to advance their own political goals. It also looks to repeat some of the worst examples of the Great Depression, which is just so wrong. Good on the Manitoba NDP for speaking up against it.

https://magpiebrule.ca/2020/04/21/crisis-overreach-in-manitoba/

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Not necessarily a fan of businessman and ex-chair of Manitoba Hydro, but I agree with his opinion piece:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/sandy-riley-manitoba-cuts-1.5539740

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 wrote:

..last night was the 1st session. attendees wee from coast to coast. the presentation was based on this briarpatch piece that was published in feb. one of the authors doing the presenting included updates since feb.

Canada and the crisis of capitalism

..a lot of material was presented and should a taped version come out i will post. here are some points:

- as of the day before yesterday 8 million people had applied for cerb

- the feds have avoided making any changes to ei. there are still only 40% found eligible.

- the temporary salary top up..75%. there are no requirements on businesses to pay the remaining 25%. there are no restriction on bonuses. the money for the top up is coming out of general revenues and not through biz taxes. this ensures that people pay for this.  

-  under capitalism economic crisis’ are necessary. they perform a needed cleansing. low profit companies are wiped out. crisis are planned for.

- who pays for crisis is decided by struggle. how well people can organize/resist. 

- a quote presented. "In many respects I think Canada is the most "successful" in rolling leftist ideas and locking them into the neo-liberal framework, thus stifling their ability to transform."

..this 2016 documentary was recommended.

HyperNormalisation

Adam Curtis explains how, at a time of confusing and inexplicable world events, politicians and the people they represent have retreated in to a damaging over-simplified version of what is happening.

..and you can watch it here.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

**Socially-Distanced Action at the Legislative Building on May 1st, 12pm: a Honk-a-thon and Signs! **

By cutting jobs and social services that people desperately rely on, the Pallister government is hurting Manitoba. These cuts will hurt vulnerable Manitobans the most, and are out of step with what economists, academics, other governments and community agencies recommend to maintain a stable economy and position Manitoba properly for the post-pandemic future.

We are protesting these cuts. We support community, not cuts.
If you want to see our government make better choices,

If you want to see our government investing in our communities instead, participate in a socially-distanced action at the Legislative Building on May 1st, 12pm: a Honk-a-thon and Signs!

HOW TO TAKE PART:

STEP 1: Make a sign
- Tell Brian Pallister why we need investment in communities, not cuts!
- Make sure there is a way to stake it in the ground! We will also have some extra stakes available on Friday.
- Want to join others in getting creative? Join the online art-build tomorrow (Wednesday the 29th): https://www.facebook.com/events/1536578169846639

STEP 2: Complete this google form to organize drop off or pickup of your sign: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeQEetsYhUUKeNvhgB8vxxQ5huvUVa7rMofdd80KTZWIpkZHQ/viewform

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

All the above very on point, epaulo. Thanks.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Disaster Capitalism at Work in Manitoba

One misstep from disaster

While many will escape the worst health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic currently sweeping the country, a large number of Canadians will become casualties of the recession the virus has triggered. The job market is slowly being eaten away, and with it, wages and consumer power. A positive feedback loop of unemployment is likely if governments do not adopt new and radical measures to combat the unfolding recession.

A consumer debt bubble has accumulated over decades due to an explosion of cheap credit and unsustainable levels of debt. In late March, the Consumer Debt Index released a study that claimed over 50 percent of Canadians are $200 away from financial insolvency during the crisis. If this study is accurate, and our governments do not take proper steps to ameliorate, prevent or forgive insolvency, the largest economic collapse of the last century is but a few missed paycheques away.

The economic disaster on our doorstep is less about the pandemic than it is about the instability of capitalism and the inability of neoliberal governance to respond to crisis in an efficient and equitable fashion.

Manitoba is already receiving a glimpse of the austerity that many Canadians will likely have to face in the coming months. The Pallister government has shown itself to be incapable of moving beyond deficit reduction-obsessed politics and implementing a new economic model that prioritises mass prosperity over cutting and privatizing public services under the guise of the pandemic.

“Now is not the time for balancing budgets”

By March, Statistics Canada indicated that Manitoba had lost over 23,000 jobs, and on April 14, Premier Brian Pallister announced plans to claw back funding for “non-essential” public services. These proposed cuts will purportedly be around 10 percent and will likely produce significant job loss. The cuts will affect universities, crown corporations, non-profits, various social services and other publicly-funded organizations.

Few are really sure what Pallister means by “non-essential” services. According to union officials, the provincial government was unable to define what services they deem to be essential or not. It is probably safe to assume that many programs supplying crucial help to the most vulnerable will be negatively effected.

Although COVID-19 has put the brakes on the lives of many ordinary people, thousands still rely on crucial public services to navigate their increasingly precarious environments. Cuts will only make the situation less bearable for a significant portion of the population.

Beyond those who cannot navigate their situations without the help of crucial services, employees of these sectors are going to endure job loss and wage cuts. Although Pallister has said he will make public servants eligible for part-time work and EI, there is no indication from the federal government this will be permitted.

The premier has ultimately provided the public sector with two options: accept reduced pay and hours or be laid off. Nonetheless, the loss of wages from part-time work alone, will make the economic situation significantly more dire.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..more from above

quote:

What is this really about?

Pallister has declared a four-month buffer period for the cuts, but many believe they will remain long after the crisis has ended and may even intensify later on. In the words of Wab Kinew, leader of Manitoba’s NDP, “I don’t think anybody expects Pallister to cut a job and then bring it back in the future.”

Considering Manitoba’s deficit is expected to grow to $5 billion during the pandemic, it would not be a stretch to see the Conservative government take extreme action to re-gain lost ground.

As the infamous University of Chicago economist Milton Freidman wrote, “only a crisis–actual or perceived–produces real change. When that crisis occurs, the actions that are taken depend on the ideas lying around.” Progressive author and commentator Naomi Klein has warned against the powers of elites to profit from crisis and push forward ‘shock doctrine’ policies which, under regular circumstances, would be exceedingly difficult.

In an interview with a service provider employed in the non-profit sector, Canadian Dimension asked what the aftermath of the crisis will mean for the public sector. She expressed anxiety about Pallister’s tendency towards austerity:

He doesn’t care about non-profits. He doesn’t care about social issues. If we let this happen it will remain. I think this is a way of getting what he’s wanted for a long time and it’s a dangerous thing to believe that it’s only going to last for four months… social services will be cut drastically. If we think that pressing issues such as gender-based violence, family violence, poverty, addiction is bad as is, it’s going to get much worse if people can’t access resources. With budget cuts and shutting down organizations that are doing essential frontline work for these issues during the pandemic, it’s going to completely expedite everything Manitoba is dealing with right now. We’re not going to be dealing with exclusively a financial deficit, it’s going to be socially crippling as well. The issues that were there before the pandemic are still here during the pandemic and if we cut resources now, they are going to be considerably worse after.

Jaqueline Romanow, President of the University of Winnipeg Faculty Association has described Pallister’s agenda as “disturbing.” The President of the University of Manitoba’s Faculty Association, Janet Morrill, reiterated this stance noting, “this is not the time to balance budgets on the back of institutions which are going to be essential for getting [us] out of this.”

The Manitoba Organization of Faculty Associations also indicated that they reject Pallister’s austerity agenda, asserting, “Mr. Pallister himself admitted that cuts to the public sector would cover only a dime of every dollar of deficit financing needed to see Manitoba through the crisis. That level of saving is not worth gutting institutions that are an essential part of the economy and social fabric of Manitoba.” The funding cuts indicate, more than anything, an abuse of political power during a perilous crisis when the public is immobilized.

Manitobans must hold the Pallister government to account and prevent it from capitalizing on the anxiety produced by the pandemic to benefit his austerity agenda. Sacrifice, after all, is the rhetoric of the powerful.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Pallister has always been frightening and ambitious. Now that he finally has power, Manitobans are in for a rough ride - similar to the hell Ontarians went through with Harris.

Aristotleded24

laine lowe wrote:
Pallister has always been frightening and ambitious. Now that he finally has power, Manitobans are in for a rough ride - similar to the hell Ontarians went through with Harris.

I don't think there is any similarity between the 2 situations. Harris was presiding over a somewhat stable economy, so while the cuts were brutal, at least there was that. The economy in Manitoba has blown up completely, there was vicious austerity even before coronavirus, and Pallister is stubbornly doubling down on his austerity agenda when even conservative premiers in other provinces have been more generous. I think this will be worse than what happened with Harris.

Ken Burch

It may have to come to a repeat of THIS:

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/winnipeg-general-strike

Only this time, with accompanying general strikes in Brandon, Steinbach, Thompson, Portage La Prairie and every other significant community in the province.

(Thanks to Aristotle for correcting it when I once again moved a town in Ontario to Manitoba, without even asking the Bramptonites if they wanted to move).

Aristotleded24

Ken Burch wrote:
It may have to come to a repeat of THIS:

https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/winnipeg-general-strike

Only this time, with accompanying general strikes in Brandon, Steinbach, Thompson, Portage La Prairie and every other significant community in the province.

Steinbach would be a bit of a challenge because even as popular as Gary Doer was a PC candidate could still expect to win that seat (which has a high Mennonite concentration) with a ham sandwich running under that banner. I agree on the rest of the communities, and have said for years that Winnipeg is too divided by class for a Winnipeg-only strategy to be effective. Even though the NDP has never won Portage, I agree that it should be a focus for the NDP as well. It is a major city in the province, grappling with the issues that other cities are, and it also has a large First Nations population with a First Nation close by. Dauphin is another interesting case, considering the anger over the closure of the local jail which even local community based groups into restorative justice are opposed to.

Aristotleded24

Guess who Canada's most unpopular Premier is right now?

Quote:

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister has the lowest approval rating of any premier in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic, with just 47 per cent of Manitobans giving his leadership a positive review, a new poll suggests.

Only two premiers had approval ratings below 50 per cent during the previous quarter in the Angus Reid Institute poll, which was conducted online from May 19 to 24 and released Thursday: Pallister and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, who had a 48 per cent rating.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

He really has an arrogant tone and often sounds like he is scolding people that question him. At the start, I thought he behaved better than I expected from him but in recent weeks, his obsession with cost-cutting has just been beyond irritating and extremely frustrating. Back to form, Pallister. Among my friends, we joke that he is super cranky because his Costa Rica stay was cut short.

Aristotleded24

This is relatively minor, but I want to discuss the changes to the provincial park pass system. Essentially instead of hanging a pass in your window now you have to attach your license plate to it. The justification was that it was a needed modernization. That part I can understand. But why take away the pass that you could hang on your mirror? You could just go the park gate and purchase that pass, easy and away you go. I don't remember any complaints about that before the government changed it. The fact that the government would make such a change that nobody was asking for speaks to their tone-deaf, petty approach to governing.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

That seems like a pointless change and asking for more effort to be made to use the pass. So how does it work if someone wants to access the park by bike or even on foot?

Aristotleded24

Most parks are too far away from any major settlement for that to be a practical issue, but I do see that point as well.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

So Pallister went there - I guess he couldn't help his racist self. After declining attendance at a Black Life Matters rally at the Legislature this weekend due to doctor's orders (elder with asthma) he had to add after saying that he knows black lives matter, "all lives matter".  Freaking asshole. Also, he is pretty cavalier about protecting other vulnerable people who are on the frontlines and may have asthma and other serious underlying conditions.

 

Aristotleded24

Guess who is calling for the dismantling of a homeless camp in Point Douglas?

Quote:

The Manitoba Metis Federation is prepared to take legal action against the City of Winnipeg over the growing homeless encampment next to its headquarters near the Disraeli Freeway, according to a letter addressed to the city dated June 2.

The MMF building is located on Henry Avenue, near the South Point Douglas area, and there is a large homeless camp next to it that continues to grow.

Federation president David Chartrand says they started having issues with the people living there last winter, but it's been getting worse of late. Some workers have been harassed or threatened and no longer feel safe going to work, and the MMF has spent about $138,000 on extra security for workers and to protect the property.

"It's getting unbelievable and uncontrollable," Chartrand told CBC News.

Drug use, public indecency, fires and violence are often witnessed around the encampment, he said, and some people living there have mental health issues.

How would we respond if it was white middle-class Winnipeggers expressing the same sentiments that are stated by Chartrand?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

That is excellent, Epaulo!

Aristotleded24

Premier Wab Kinew?

Quote:

Support for the PCs among Manitoba voters who are either leaning toward a certain party or who have already decided who they would mark their ballot for dropped five points (down to 38 per cent) compared to the last Probe Research poll done in March.

Meanwhile, more than one-third of Manitobans (or 36 per cent) would now back the provincial NDP — a three per cent jump since March.

The poll suggests the NDP leads over the PCs in most areas of seat-dense Winnipeg (with 44 per cent support compared to 25 per cent), with the exception of the southeast part of the city, where the two parties are statistically tied.

Support for the Manitoba Liberal Party went up four percent (to 18 per cent) since the last poll, while support for the Green Party went down one percent (to 14 per cent). In Winnipeg, the Liberals have 21 per cent support and the Greens have 8 per cent, the poll suggests.

Fourteen per cent of Manitoba voters surveyed are still undecided, the poll suggests.

It's encouraging, but more needs to be done. The NDP needs to be at a rock-solid 40% at least to be in contention. I would also like to see numbers for rural Manitoba, which unfortunatley the Probe poll does not make easily accessible.

Aristotleded24

Apparently there is a safety partnership:

Quote:

The Downtown Safety Partnership, started as a pilot project last year, is getting $5 million funding from the provincial government to help establish it as a permanent non-profit organization focused on street outreach.

"Whether you live, work or play downtown, we want to make sure that you feel safe downtown," Justice Minister Cliff Cullen said at a news conference Friday. 

Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman said it's crucial to find ways to reduce the number of times police have to respond to calls dealing with social and health issues, not crime.

Establishing the Downtown Safety Partnership is an important step toward achieving that goal, he said.

I'm very concerned that this partnership involves True North, and I would like to know who the other "stakeholders" are, and I'm very worried about any initiative the Pallister government would impliment. Will this actually make a positive difference, or is this a P3 arrangement that's primarily designed to make middle-class Winnipeggers feel more comfortable attending Jets games once the Jets are playing downtown again.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I am upset with Pallister's latest move to usher in two-tier medicine. Of course there is a backlog on surgeries but Pallister gutted the public health system before the pandemic. Now he is claiming that to deal with the backlog, contracts will be given to both public and private health services providers. Who the hell are these private health care providers that can provide surgery? And why not just rehire all the people that were let go by Pallister so that our public health care system can do what it was mandated to do?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..over and over again i've seen this. 1st create the crisis then present a privatization solution.

..it never works though. the crisis deepens because of the transfer of wealth. 

Aristotleded24

Talk about the mask literally coming off:

Quote:

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister admits he made a mistake after he was photographed Tuesday without a mask at Toronto's Pearson airport.

He was breaking an airport rule mandating face coverings for travellers to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

"I lifted my mask to join some friends in conversation at the Toronto airport this afternoon. It was an error on my part, it won't happen again," Pallister said in an email Tuesday. 

Pallister appeared to be waiting at a departure gate, according to two photos that surfaced on Twitter.

He was in the company of several travellers, including federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer, who also wasn't wearing a mask. 

Pallister told media last week he was concerned about flying during the COVID-19 pandemic, since he's a senior with asthma.

Since June 1, the airport has required masks for "all passengers and airport employees" in public spaces "at all times."

"This includes the pre- and post-security screening areas of the terminals, parking facilities, people mover train, sidewalks/curbs outside the terminals and other outdoor public areas," the Pearson website says.

So after berating a bunch of poor kids for playing basketball outside in the spring (probably one of the only forms of recreation they still had access to) and saying that he didn't feel safe attending the Black Lives Matter protests on account of being in the high risk category, he goes and is caught not wearing a  mask in an *airport* which is bringing in all kinds of germs from God knows where?

Reprehensible piece of work, this guy is.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

He is so full of sh*t.

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