Is or will Manitoba having the highest active Covid cases per capita affect political popularity?

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jerrym
Is or will Manitoba having the highest active Covid cases per capita affect political popularity?

"As of late October 2020 Manitoba has the highest number of active cases per capita of all Canadian provinces and territories." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19_pandemic_in_Manitoba#:~:text=The%...).&text=As%20of%20late%20October%202020,all%20Canadian%20provinces%20and%20territories.)

What impact do you think this is now having on the popularity of the government and other political parties? Will it have an impact if this persists?

Aristotleded24

As much as there is legitimate criticism of how the Pallister government has governed in general, no I don't think this will have much impact. People may be frustrated with government and not like one Premier or another, but I think they will be even less tolerant of different political parties using the pandemic to score political points. The NDP in Saskatchewan tried this approach over Saskatchewan's school re-opening plans, and the public saw right through it. It didn't resonate at all.

jerrym

In answering a couple of questions raised in another thread, I ended up analyzing what has happened to parties's  popularity across the country. It gives some idea of what could happen in Manitoba. The short answer is the picture is complicated, but there appears to be some clear trends from examining polls and elections across the country by province. 

The first question arose because of the claim that the NDP was now in trouble in the polls nationally because of Covid. Here's my analysis. 

Pondering wrote:

 I heard on the news last night that the NDP is down to 13% with support going to the Liberals. NDP strategy isn't working. 

For a more accurate reflection of the polls here are the percentages the NDP and Greens received in all polls in October: 

    NDP                                 Greens

October 1  18%                   6%

 October 4  20%                  4%

October 6  16%                   5%

October 11  21%                  6%

October 16  13.4%             7.6%

October 18 18%                  6%

October 19 13.7%              8.7%

October 21  15%                5%

October 25  18%               5%

October 26  17%               7%

Oct Average 17.01%          6.03% 

2019 election 16.0%        6.5%

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opinion_polling_for_the_44th_Canadian_fede...

In other words, both parties bounced up and down in the polls within certain margins with the NDP in October up 1.0%and the Greens down 0.5%  in their October average compared to their results in the 2019 election. For comparisons sake the Liberals average for October is 36.6%, up 3.5% in October compared to the 2019 election, while the Conservatives averaged 31.3%  in October, down 3.0%  compared to the 2019 election. So most the voter movement has occurred between the Liberals and Conservatives, with the NDP up slightly and the Greens down slightly on average. The margins for a Liberal majority are paper thin and at the outer limits of the margin of error if an election is called in the immediate future. While an election campaign could dramatically increase or decrease any party's vote share depending on what happened, there is no guarantee that would benefit or harm any particular party or leave the end results pretty much as they are right now, as campaigns each have their own rhythm.

jerrym

Another query caused me to look deeper at the polls and elections during Covid. 

Left Turn wrote:

 

Looks to me as though voters are flocking to incumbent parties across the board in Canada, because pandemic.

 

 

The election campaigns tell a somewhat more complicated story. In the New Brunswick election, the Conservatives had a 16% lead over the Liberals early the election campaign on August 30th but ended up winning by 5% over the Liberals with a ho-hum campaign while the Greens were able to keep their three seats. In BC, the Conservatives self-destructed during the campaign and suffered historic losses in their modern iteration, while the NDP performed well in the campaign, increasing their vote share during the campaign, won more seats than they ever have and are expected to win more after all votes are counted, while the Greens were able to maintain their three seats because of a good campaign, despite many expecting them to be wiped out by the NDP. The Saskatchewan Party ran a smooth campaign while there was some internal fighting campaign in the NDP during the campaign, resulting in a large SP victory when this was combined with the perception that they handled Covid well. In other words, if one is perceived to have done a good job on the pandemic, there is a definite advantage in being the government, but the election campaign still will have  a major impact on what happens. Furthermore, a party can maintain or even improve its vote share without being in power as the NDP has done with an average of a 1.0% small increase federally over ten polls during October from the 2019 election results, if it actions are viewed favorably by voters. 

Also the Ontario and Quebec polls tell a somewhat different story. In Quebec, at the height of their pandemic crisis the CAQ fell in May and June from 52% in March to 38% on June 1st and as things improved in the summer they reached 57% on August 28th, the last poll listed on Wikipedia. Now the question is the CAQ going to or is already suffering with the high infection rates now. 

A similar story can be seen in Ontario, with the PCs dropping from 43% to 31% during the early crisis then climbing back to 48% by September 3rd. However, unlike Quebec, we now have an October poll showing them at 36% on October 12th. So there can be rapid increases and drops in popularity depending on how voters perceive one's performance on the pandemic. 

Now that we are in a second wave, incumbency could cause other provinces to rise and fall depending on how they are perceived. Manitoba, for example, has just become the province with the highest per capita number of  active Covid cases, so its government may find itself in popularity problems if this is not quickly corrected. This could also happen to the federal Liberals if things go badly in many places during the second wave and the Liberal response to the second wave is seen as problematic. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/43rd_Ontario_general_election

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/43rd_Quebec_general_election

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_New_Brunswick_general_election

jerrym

Perhaps out of tiredness I did not look at what is happening in the Manitoba and Alberta polls after taking the time to analyze the polls and election campaigns in several provinces shown above in post #4. With the rise and fall in Ontario's and Quebec's governing PC and CAQ popularity closely aligning with their rise and fall in Covid case numbers, it appears that Covid can impact the governing parties popularity both positively and negatively over time. So the Manitoba may see their numbers fall if they don't reduce Covid cases per capita significantly over time. Alberta's story is complicated by the fossil fuel crisis also impacting voter's perceptions.

Generally, the Manitoba government has been perceived to be doing well in handling the pandemic because its total number of Covid-19 cases has been small. However in the last week, not only has the number of Covid-19 cases spiked in Manitoba, the situation is now being perceived differently because people now realize that this spike has given the province the highest per capita Covid case load per capita in the country. Up to now the PC government, although down slightly from its 47.1% in the September 2019 election, has done relatively well in the polls, staying between 42% and 45% since the September 2019 election, with one outlier poll of 38% in the middle of the six polls time wise. The question now is how will becoming the reigning Covid case per capita leader affect the PC's and other parties poll numbers if this case situation is not correctly corrected. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/43rd_Manitoba_general_election)

Alberta's situation is even more complicated because the province has another crisis ocurring simultaneously - the collapse of oil prices and the Alberta economy that actually began well before Covid hit. The UCP had already fallen from its April 2019 54.9% election to 42% by November 2019 and was tied with the NDP at 38% by  the September 1st 2020 poll, which is the latest poll on Wiki. The recent rapid rise is Covid cases could well help push them below the NDP in the next poll. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/31st_Alberta_general_election) What Alberta seems to be telling us is that what happens with Covid is the most powerful determinant factor in a party's fortune, but if there is another dominant issue also playing into the picture, the electoral story is that could both have a major affect in party popularity. 

Other than discussing the New Brunswick election in post #4, I left the Maritimes and territories out of the analysis because their low total Covid case numbers have helped all of them remain pretty popular. 

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Pallister is not perceived as doing a great job at all from what I hear from friends. People I have spoken with (by phone or email) even cite Doug Ford as being better at handling the pandemic.

Aristotleded24

Overall, it has been the City of Winnipeg, First Nations communities, and a few people connected to Maple Leaf in Brandon who have borne the brunt of the pandemic, and since Pallister never had much support among those groups, I doubt this will really make or break his popularity.

Honestly, I don't think the lockdown measures are going to work at all. Winnipeg went to orange on the pandemic scale about a month ago, and masks were mandated then. Since then, the number of outbreaks in care homes went up sharply, and a few schools have had outbreaks resulting in students being sent home for online learning. It's probably a case where this current disease wave will rise, reach a plateau, and then fall off on its own as disease curves do. Unfortunately the result is that Roussin, Friesen, Pallister et all will then get credit for a natural phenomenon that they had nothing to do with.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

More and more physicians are weighing in and asking for a lockdown in Winnipeg.

Aristotleded24

When those physicians are willing to stand outside for 10, 12, 14 or 16 consecutive hours on a cold winter day (much worse than what yesterday was) I will take that opinion into account. With libraries, the Forks, and Portage Place closed to people sitting around inside, that is what you could be forcing many of the poorer people in Winnipeg to have to endure. Thankfully the weather is going to be nice for the next week, but that threat remains. Besides, if the closure of public spaces leads to such things like loitering in stores, increased violence including random attacks as people become desparate, or calls to the fire-paramedic services for people doing drugs, passing out, or freezing to death, you're not preventing strain on the health care system, you are merely shuffling it around. It's already been a violent 2 years in Winnipeg, with a high number of homicides and people dead as a result of interactions with the police. I would hate to see an over-reaction to covid make all of this worse. Look at the rioting that is hapening in Europe in response to their lockdowns. If the health care system can't handle a surge in people with respiratory illnesses at a time when such a surge in cases can be expected, how is it going to handle full-blown civil unrest like what we are seeing not only in Europe, but American cities like Minneapolis, Kenosha, Chicago, and Portland?

The idea that physicians are calling for more restrictions is essentially a media-manufactured phenomenon anyways. Are there physicians who want a lockdown? Of course, as the news was able to find them and hear their opinion. The media does that because that fits into the narrative they want to tell, which is that covid is this big scary thing that everyone should be afraid of. They did quote some advocates who specifically said that the covid response measures are driving more people to use drugs, but other than that not much. Are police calls for domestic violence up? Are child protection workers seeing an increased caseload for child abuse? Or are they seeing a huge drop and worried because children aren't at school, where teachers would be able to pick up those problems? Are mental health and suicide crisis call centres overwhelmed in this province? I would love it if the Covid Brainwashing Corporation or the network that uses Coronavirus to Terrorize its Viewers would start asking these questions. That's why essentially stopped paying attention to these outlets and started getting my numbers right off the Manitoba government webpage.

Unless you are willing to what happened in China and basically lock people in their houses until the virus goes away, lockdowns don't work and are just a feel-good measure anyways.

Aristotleded24

The test positivity rate is still a bit high for my liking, but at least the number of new daily infections is falling off really quickly over the past few days. Here's hoping that rapid fall-off continues and that the virus never bothers us again once this wave is done.

jerrym

I hope things get better. 

Another five people with COVID-19 have died in Manitoba, including four more deaths connected with outbreaks at St. Boniface Hospital and personal care homes, health officials announced Monday.

They also reported 241 new cases of the illness, bringing the total number of infections in Manitoba since the start of the pandemic to 6,275.

As new restrictions came into effect across the province, Chief Provincial Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin also announced new rules for people in the Winnipeg region who are self-isolating due to possible COVID-19 exposure.

If any member of a household has symptoms of COVID-19, the entire household must self-isolate, he said at a news conference Monday afternoon. ...

Roussin acknowledged that isolating from all household members could be difficult for many, and said the province has alternative accommodations available.

This latest measure comes as Manitoba, and the Winnipeg region in particular, continue to see climbing COVID-19 numbers.

Over the previous three days, Manitoba had reported 1,141 new cases of COVID-19, including 480 announced Friday — the highest number ever reported on a single day. Thirteen more deaths were also announced over that three-day period. ...

Monday's update was the first from Roussin since Friday, when he announced the Winnipeg area would move to the red, or critical, level on the province's pandemic scale. That change came into effect Monday. 

The rest of the province is now at the orange, or restricted, level.

The widespread restrictions across the province include reduced capacity or closures of many businesses, smaller gathering sizes, and a requirement that businesses gather contact information from customers to assist in contact tracing.

The new measures will remain in place for at least two weeks. ...

Manitoba's five-day test-positivity rate — a rolling average of the number of COVID-19 tests that come back positive — is now nine per cent, extending a streak of setting new records to a fifth day.

In Winnipeg, the test-positivity rate is 9.8 per cent, although health officials caution that number is less reliable due to the smaller sample size.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/manitoba-covid-19-update-monday-...

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I hope things improve too, Jerry. The death toll is high and even if the majority (but certainly not all) are people over the age of 70 years old that is not acceptable. I think it is ageist to consider those deaths less brutal to those families who have lost loved ones than those of younger people, also equally tragic. I also think it is dismissive to wave the claim that elderly people die every year due to some flu bug or infection going around. Not in these freaking numbers and not with these hardships of being quarantined. As for these homes that continue to have high rates, I am appalled that in the 7 months that the pandemic became official, they have not addressed their issues with underpaid, part-time workers or over-croweded living conditions for the residents.

Aristotleded24

And of course the tragedy with the care homes is that needless outbreaks and fatalities have been happening in these care homes throughout the country, and have done so regardless of the state of lockdown or how open or closed a particular economy was. All of that could have been addressed for a fraction of what it has cost to tank our economy and we would see much better results with that than what we are seeing now.

Aristotleded24
eastnoireast

Aristotleded24 wrote:

And of course the tragedy with the care homes is that needless outbreaks and fatalities have been happening in these care homes throughout the country, and have done so regardless of the state of lockdown or how open or closed a particular economy was. All of that could have been addressed for a fraction of what it has cost to tank our economy and we would see much better results with that than what we are seeing now.

exactly. 

80% of total canadian covid deaths occurred in care homes. 

80%.

in definable, contained, mostly institutional buildings. 

a whole summer to make changes.

what has been done in that time, except for cutting off the inmates, er, sorry residents from their people?

sfa. 

society-wide lockdowns must be the answer.

 

Aristotleded24

eastnoireast wrote:
Aristotleded24 wrote:

And of course the tragedy with the care homes is that needless outbreaks and fatalities have been happening in these care homes throughout the country, and have done so regardless of the state of lockdown or how open or closed a particular economy was. All of that could have been addressed for a fraction of what it has cost to tank our economy and we would see much better results with that than what we are seeing now.

exactly. 

80% of total canadian covid deaths occurred in care homes. 

80%.

in definable, contained, mostly institutional buildings. 

a whole summer to make changes.

what has been done in that time, except for cutting off the inmates, er, sorry residents from their people?

sfa. 

society-wide lockdowns must be the answer.

Underfunding and gutting the health care system in Winnipeg also hasn't really helped matters. Nurses were doing forced overtime before the pandemic hit. I really hope it doesn't become as bad as some doctors suspect it will.

Aristotleded24

Meanwhile, the situation continues to decline here in Winnipeg. After massive declines in the number of new cases since the record was set last week, we have seen a sharp rise over the last 2 days. Winnipeg remains a viral hotspot. I suspect crowded nursing homes, along with the high level of poverty that exists in the city, is contributing to the spread. It also isn't helping that our Minister of Health is picking public fights with doctors. A Doodle poll followed by a Zoom conference followed by a joint press release outlining what next steps the province is taking would have been much better.

Aristotleded24

Friesen still won't apologize:

Quote:

Manitoba health minister Cameron Friesen stopped short of apologizing for questioning the motivation of doctors who warned of "grave peril" as COVID-19 case numbers surge, but says he regrets what he said.

He's been under fire since Tuesday when he challenged more than 200 doctors and infectious disease experts for writing a letter that expressed grave concern with Manitoba's worsening COVID-19 outlook.

"If I would go back, I'd choose a different noun," Friesen said, without specifying the word. 

"But if I go forward, what is important right now and I feel the most important thing is to listen to those doctors," he said. "We support you. We need you now more than ever."

While he didn't apologize, Friesen showed remorse for his comments at Tuesday's committee hearing.

"I get it, they're scared and they want the best for their patients and I absolutely agree," Friesen said at the time.

Aristotleded24

It's exactly as I feared:

Quote:

The survey also showed Manitobans’ approval of the province’s response has dropped significantly since June.

It said the group of people that feel the province is doing a good job of protecting public health plummeted from 77 per cent in June, to around 45 per cent now.

The majority of the people who approve of the province’s response to protect public health do not live in Winnipeg (56 per cent), voted for the Progressive Conservative government (71 per cent), and are over 55 years of age (53 per cent).

So basically the pandemic appears to be hitting people who wouldn't vote for Pallister anyways and hasn't really shaken his core base. Although that 45% figure looks low, the PCs have a rock-solid 40-plus percent of the vote they can count on in this province. It's true the southern portion of the province has just been placed into the red zone, but PC support in this portion of the province is so strong that it's not going to make a huge dent. Unless something drastic like a bunch of rural people who need specialized care in Winnipeg can't get it happens, on these numbers Pallister and the PCs can easily be re-elected, especially if the Liberals are strong enough to cost the NDP seats in Winnipeg.

jerrym

Frankly I never expected there to be such a dramatic drop as going from 77% to 45% in perception of government public health performance relatively quickly shortly after the covid numbers zoomed. The rural seats are not likely to fall because of their large margins but the numbers already suggest that there will be no dramatic large victory like that of the BC NDP if the infection rate remains high over a long period and the PCs are perceived as a significant part of the problem, a further drop could occur endangering many of the PCs city seats. A lot depends also on how well the Manitoba NDP look as a government alternative as the next election alternative. 

Aristotleded24

Jerry, Winnipeg is so divided by class that there are parts of the city that will endure whatever they have to in order to keep the tax-and-spend socialist NDP out of office. The PCs hold all of their current rural seats, they hold onto government and can do so even without majority support in Winnipeg. It's that simple. To break it down even further, except for a spike in Brandon this summer, the western region of the province has no reason to vote against the PC government based on the current covid situation because it hasn't impacted there the way it has in the rest of the province.

Aristotleded24

As I mentioned in the other thread, with the latest lockdown outright closing churches, I think that may have a backlash against the PC government. Much of the PC support base comes from right-wing fundamentalist churches, and they will not be happy about being forced to close.

Honestly, I don't think Pallister cares any more. I always suspected he planned the most recent election to be his last. I think he's doing whatever he can and preparing to retire to Costa Rica when things get really nasty, leaving someone else to deal with the damage he has done. I don't know how someone like that can be stopped unfortunately.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I agree. He doesn't give a crap and has one eye on that jetway to his flight to Costa Rica. He has been trying to be the leader of something since the 80s. Premiership of Manitoba became his highest summit so now he can safely runaway, proud as shit for making more for himself than being a perpetual backbencher.

Aristotleded24

Problems in Steinbach:

Quote:

Sarah Neufeld is a nurse in the Emergency Room at the Bethesda Regional Health Centre. She says the number of positive COVID-19 cases she and her team are dealing with on a daily basis are considerably more than they or the hospital building itself can handle. She notes it is not uncommon to run out of rooms and be forced to relocate beds into the hallways and even beds themselves are not always available.

“We’ve even had someone in a chair because we didn’t even have enough beds,” she remarks. "To have every room, every space, every hospital bed, and every ICU bed full. It is something I have never seen in my career.”

There have been rumors around Steinbach that certain individuals with the virus have been forced to wait out the night in an ambulance. While Neufeld could not substantiate those reports, she says, considering the current spatial constraints, it is not altogether unlikely.

“If we have Covid-positive patients that come in via EMS they cannot be offloaded until we have a bed and because we are so overcapacity, it is entirely possible that they had to wait for hours in the ambulance bay with attendants.”

In addition to not having enough staff to manage the number of incoming patients, Neufeld says the staff that the hospital does have are burning out fast. These days, she says it is realistic to expect an eleven-hour shift with no breaks.

“How are we supposed to manage in these conditions?” she questions. “These aren’t sustainable.”

To protect the privacy of patients, Manitoba has what is called the Personal Health Information Act. One effect of the bill is that it tends to silence workers in the medical field making them less able to discuss their job. Because of this, Neufeld feels the general public does not have a clear understanding of what is going on behind hospital doors. It is her opinion that residents of Steinbach and the surrounding area need to know what is happening, especially right now.

“I feel driven to advocate for my fellow healthcare workers that I work alongside,” she states. “I feel like the community does not have an idea of how bad it is and how desperate we are in the ER.”

Remember back in the summer when covid cases were trending down and, instead of allowing us to be happy for a relative short period of good news, the government kept warning us of a second wave? What is happening in Steinbach right now was not unpredictable. Everybody knew we were going to have cases rise with colder weather.  Why didn't the government put forward a plan to deal with this inevitable surge in cases? They should have had a Plan B ready for every region of the province in case local health services became overwhelmed.

Incidentally, this is a very staunchly conservative region of the province. It is represented by Kelvin Goertzen, who as Health Minister was responsible for the changes which closed the Misericorida urgent care centre and 3 other emergency rooms in Winnipeg. He never had anything to fear from an election challenger, as the PCs typically take well over 80% of the vote in that area. Even this I don't think would be enough to dislodge him. Plus, by the time the next election rolls around, he will have been MLA for 20 years. I could certainly see him deciding to pack it in and moving on to something else.

Aristotleded24

laine lowe wrote:
He doesn't give a crap and has one eye on that jetway to his flight to Costa Rica. He has been trying to be the leader of something since the 80s. Premiership of Manitoba became his highest summit so now he can safely runaway, proud as shit for making more for himself than being a perpetual backbencher.

He was there this past year when key decisions were being made about how to handle this thing before it came out of control:

Quote:
Costa Rican government records obtained exclusively by PressProgress show that Manitoba’s Premier snuck away to Costa Rica where he owns a luxury villa nestled in a private rainforest for 17 days between January 25 and February 11, 2020 only two days after Manitoba announced it had started tracking the spread of COVID-19.

...

Pallister’s late January trip to Costa Rica was already his second stay of the year.

Travel logs obtained by PressProgress show Pallister spent Christmas in Costa Rica between December 18, 2019 and January 9, 2020. Pallister returned home to Winnipeg for two weeks before heading back south for his second trip on January 25.

In total, the Premier of Manitoba spent 41 days — nearly six weeks — in Costa Rica between mid-December 2019 and mid-February 2020.

The travel logs also show Pallister made the same trip on the same dates between December 2018 and February 2019. Pallister was also in Costa Rica that summer.

In 2017, Pallister pledged he would limit his time in Costa Rica to 5 weeks each year after initially stating he wanted to spend two months per year at his Tamarindo luxury villa.

Meanwhile, I also have to ask if we are seriously having this conversation:

Quote:

clarification on the protocol for dealing with a care-home outbreak that requires rapid intervention, a confidential document shows.

Those are two concerns detailed in an internal report from Doctors Manitoba, which represents physicians in the province.

It's not like we're in Northern Italy where the system was hit so badly in the early days that it didn't know how to respond. We've known this could have been a problem for months. Why did we not prepare for it? Instead of asking the question, "who should we turn away if our hospitals become overloaded" the question we should have asked is, "okay, suppose we're in a situation where our hospitals are overloaded. What is our Plan B for more surge capacity to deal with it?" I know the military was called into nursing homes in Ontario and Quebec. Do they not have extra medical capabilities that could have been called upon in this time of crisis?

The sad thing is, it looks to me like there is no serious plan to address this issue. Instead, it feels like the government would rather hold an Italy-like situation over our heads and use it to threaten us and make our lives more miserable rather than helping us.

Aristotleded24

Too little too late?

Quote:

Staff at personal care homes in Manitoba could soon get some extra help with tasks like observing residents, providing companionship and stocking supplies.

The Manitoba government is partnering with Red River College on a condensed training program that could see the first group of students working as uncertified health-care aides in care homes as early as Dec. 8.

"Ensuring the appropriate care and support is available to residents of Manitoba personal care homes is a top priority as we see the strain that COVID-19 is placing on [the] personal care home workforce," Health Minister Cameron Friesen said in a news release.

"We must do everything possible to ensure we have staff … to support the care needs of residents in our long-term care homes. This requires an immediate increase in the available workforce and this new training program addresses this goal."

Am I the only one who thinks this looks like the government is cutting corners to get these people into the care homes as quickly as possible? Let's rush the training, there's probably also a shortage of PPE, and have the high stress of this sutiation expose not only the LTC residents but also these students to infection. What could possibly go wrong?

We knew there was going to be a second wave. Wouldn't it have been better to run these programs properly, and run a lot more of them, in the late spring and into the summer when we would have had the time to make sure everybody was prepared for what they were going to inevitably face? That seems like it would have made a difference, and maybe the care homes would not have become so badly infected and our hospitals would not be under the strain they are currently experiencing.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I totally agree, Aristotled. The government had the whole summer to figure something out based on what happened in Ontario and Quebec when long term care facilities were overwhelmed and revealed substandard care conditions in those facilities. At this late stage, ramming through this crazy 1 week certification program for health care aids is just a notch above their failed called for volunteers because as Pallister alluded, no skills are required for this kind of work. I guess he was told that was absurd and circled back to create this fig leaf program. It is disgusting.

Aristotleded24

And guess whose fault it is that we are in this mess:

Quote:
People ignoring public health rules once again found themselves in Brian Pallister's crosshairs on Saturday morning, when the Manitoba premier applauded his government's handling of the pandemic and reiterated the need to come down hard on rule breakers.

Pallister made the remarks at the Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba's annual general meeting, which was moved online this year because of the pandemic.

...

At Saturday's meeting, Pallister also accused the NDP's Wab Kinew of riling people up, after the Opposition leader suggested Revera — the for-profit company that runs both the Maples and Parkview care homes, which have seen Manitoba's worst COVID-19 outbreaks — should be run out of town.

The premier suggested to party members and supporters who attended the video conference that those comments later led people to organize protests condemning his government's handling of the pandemic.

"Was it coincidental that, two or three days later, there's a bunch of fake blood splashed all over the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority? Is it coincidental there were protests and people throwing garbage on my lawn? I don't think it's possible to believe that it isn't connected in some way," he said.

Pallister defended his government's handling of the province's second wave of COVID-19, as Manitoba maintains the highest per capita rate of cases of the illness among Canadian provinces.

"Every province west of Nova Scotia has its highest numbers in the last few days, including Manitoba. And so trying to make the political argument that Manitoba's government missed the boat when everybody in the Western world is under attack right now is not a fruitful thing," he said.

The benchmark test positivity rate to determine how safe a community is from covid is 5%. We have been well north of that figure for about a month. Wouldn't it have been a good idea to ramp up testing capacity since then? Furtheromre, 40% of tests in Steinbach are coming back positive. The number of testing sites in that city? One, and that site has to cover the whole southeastern portion of the province. Wouldn't it be a good idea to have at least 2 centres in Steinbach, one of which is open 24-7, along with satellite centres in places like Niverville, Ste. Anne, and Sprague, and affected First Nations communities if there are any, so we can track this thing down and find out exactly what is happening? Sure case numbers would skrocket for a week, but at least we'd have a better idea of what is going on. My encouragement of seeing the total numbers drop in recent days is tempered by the fact that the percent positivity has not gone down in a similar trajectory.

bekayne
Aristotleded24

Is Pallister actively trying to get people killed?

Quote:

The province is eliminating five positions in the Southern Health Regional Authority, including the director of acute care and the director of seniors, palliative and cancer care. 

Other positions eliminated are the vice president of corporate services, manager of Red River Valley Lodge and the manager of Altona support. 

The positions were released through a freedom of information request obtained by the NDP, which was sent to the media on Monday afternoon. 

In an email statement, Southern Health said responsibilities in the positions have shifted to three different regional lead, health services positions: acute and chief nursing officer; community and continuing care; and corporate services and chief financial officer.  

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During question period, Premier Brian Pallister was criticized by the NDP opposition for cutting health-care jobs during a pandemic, with COVID-19 cases rising in Manitoba's personal care homes. 

"We have personal care homes that are begging for volunteers to do basics like feeding and providing water to seniors," said Wab Kinew, NDP opposition leader, at a press briefing. 

"Why would you cut somebody who works in seniors care at the same time that you're seeing a disaster like that unfold?" 

Pallister said the province has added hundreds of millions of additional spending for health care during the pandemic, but did not comment on the positions.

What a psychopath this man is! Gutting health care, leaving our testing and tracing system a mess, allowing problems to continue to fester in long term care facilities. And does is government address these problems? No, instead he wags his fingers and threatens people for doing the very things that make live worth living and is more concerned with enforcement of dictatorial power than actually helping people.

It's official. We cannot wait until the next election. We need to force these psychopaths out of office using every ethical and peaceful tool at our disposal. In some countries, people have taken to banging pots in protest. Is that something we can try here?