Manitoba Manitoba NDP MLA to run for Federal Ndp Nomination

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wmale20
Manitoba Manitoba NDP MLA to run for Federal Ndp Nomination

 

wmale20

More than a year after he announced his retirement, Elmwood-Transcona MP Bill Blaikie will pass his mantle to another New Democrat next weekend as the party gathers to nominate its candidate in the looming federal election.

Topping the three-person ticket is Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway, who finally made it official Friday and confirmed his intention to leave provincial politics and make a bid for a seat in Ottawa.

Of the approximately 1,000 NDP members in the riding, Maloway says he's sewn up about 750.

But rival Lorene Mahoney, a nurse and longtime party volunteer, said she has been campaigning for more than a year and Maloway doesn't have a lock on the nomination.

"There are a lot of undecided voters," she said.

The third candidate vying for the NDP nomination, Canadian Union of Public Employees Manitoba president Kevin Rebeck, couldn't be reached for comment.

Maloway, a maverick backbencher in Premier Gary Doer's government, has been elected seven times as the MLA for Elmwood, most recently in May 2007.

"I've been through a lot of elections and sometimes things can turn real weird on you," Maloway said. "So on that basis, you want to have someone with a proven track record who can organize and win elections."

If Maloway wins the nomination, he's bound by law to resign as MLA for Elmwood, which triggers a byelection. Doer controls the timing of byelections and he's traditionally been fairly quick to call them.

Blaikie, the party's elder statesmen, will be the featured speaker at the nom inating meeting, slated for the evening of Sept. 7 at the Canad Inns Club Regent Hotel. Blaikie has represented
[url=http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/subscriber/local/story/4220147p-4813497...

Maloway seeks nod to run in Transcona

By: Mary Agnes Welch

Updated: August 30 at 12:35 AM CDT

the eastern corner of Winnipeg for nearly 30 years and is the deputy speaker of the House of Commons.

Meanwhile, the Tories are grappling with whether to hold a nomination meeting in Elmwood-Transcona or appoint what several in the party claim is a star candidate whose name is familiar to all Manitobans. The Tories have tried to hold nomination meetings twice with no success. The Liberals have yet to name or nominate a candidate.

[email protected]

wmale20

[url=http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/subscriber/local/story/4220147p-4813497...

Maloway seeks nod to run in Transcona

By: Mary Agnes Welch

Updated: August 30 at 12:35 AM CDT

quote:

Originally posted by wmale20:
[b]More than a year after he announced his retirement, Elmwood-Transcona MP Bill Blaikie will pass his mantle to another New Democrat next weekend as the party gathers to nominate its candidate in the looming federal election.

Topping the three-person ticket is Elmwood MLA Jim Maloway, who finally made it official Friday and confirmed his intention to leave provincial politics and make a bid for a seat in Ottawa.

Of the approximately 1,000 NDP members in the riding, Maloway says he's sewn up about 750.

But rival Lorene Mahoney, a nurse and longtime party volunteer, said she has been campaigning for more than a year and Maloway doesn't have a lock on the nomination.

"There are a lot of undecided voters," she said.

The third candidate vying for the NDP nomination, Canadian Union of Public Employees Manitoba president Kevin Rebeck, couldn't be reached for comment.

Maloway, a maverick backbencher in Premier Gary Doer's government, has been elected seven times as the MLA for Elmwood, most recently in May 2007.

"I've been through a lot of elections and sometimes things can turn real weird on you," Maloway said. "So on that basis, you want to have someone with a proven track record who can organize and win elections."

If Maloway wins the nomination, he's bound by law to resign as MLA for Elmwood, which triggers a byelection. Doer controls the timing of byelections and he's traditionally been fairly quick to call them.

Blaikie, the party's elder statesmen, will be the featured speaker at the nom inating meeting, slated for the evening of Sept. 7 at the Canad Inns Club Regent Hotel. Blaikie has represented

the eastern corner of Winnipeg for nearly 30 years and is the deputy speaker of the House of Commons.

Meanwhile, the Tories are grappling with whether to hold a nomination meeting in Elmwood-Transcona or appoint what several in the party claim is a star candidate whose name is familiar to all Manitobans. The Tories have tried to hold nomination meetings twice with no success. The Liberals have yet to name or nominate a candidate.

[email protected][/b]


Stockholm

People I know in Manitoba tell me he is absolutely the lowest quality and most talentless person in the Manitoba NDP caucus. There is a reason why he has never been appointed to anything by Doer. I hope one of the other contenders wins.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

What does it mean, exactly, that Maloway is considered a "maverick" NDP MLA?

Does he frequently defy the party whip? If so, does he defy it from the left or the right? Manitoba New Democrats have been plagued by splinter groups from their party's right wing(it was the vote of one such
splinterer that brought down the Pawley government in 1987 when the NDP was at 6% support in the polls, and there were the three splitters who formed the "Progressive Party" in the run-up to the '81 provincial election IIRC).

genstrike

I live in Manitoba and I've never heard about him until the Disraeli bridge issue, and that was so short ago it can come off like he was trying to get attention to prepare for this run. I'm sorry, but you have to do a little more than disagree with the municipal government on a bridge in your area once in 20 years to be a maverick. But on the other hand, somehow John McCain can be considered a maverick, so maybe the bar has been lowered in recent years. There is a lot of room for a maverick from the left in the Manitoba NDP, sadly Maloway isn't it.

ghoris

As someone posted on previous thread, Jim Maloway is the Tony Ruprecht of Manitoba politics.

The demographics suggest a safe NDP seat, but the Tories scored a surprisingly healthy 32% last time while Blaikie benefitted from a collapse in the Liberal vote.

Make no mistake, even with a mediocre candidate like Maloway, the NDP would be the odds-on favourite to win. But I expect a closer result than last time.

genstrike

quote:


Originally posted by Stockholm:
[b]People I know in Manitoba tell me he is absolutely the lowest quality and most talentless person in the Manitoba NDP caucus. There is a reason why he has never been appointed to anything by Doer. I hope one of the other contenders wins.[/b]

You know Sam Katz? [img]biggrin.gif" border="0[/img]

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Meanwhile, the Conservatives have just announced that they are running former Winnipeg Jet, Thomas Steen, in the Transcona riding.

Nothing personal, but I hope Steen gets boarded and sustains a career-ending political injury. The Conservatives are a bunch of puck hogs and goal sucks anyway, and the likeable Swede will never get a pass from the chief sniveller at 24 Sussex Drive.

kropotkin1951

quote:


Originally posted by ghoris:
[b]As someone posted on previous thread, Jim Maloway is the Tony Ruprecht of Manitoba politics.[/b]

Do you mean he is an Ontario Liberal MPP? What do you mean about him I'm confused?

genstrike

I am so not impressed whenever someone picks up an athlete as a "star candidate". You're good at hockey, big deal, please explain to me how that would help you be an MP (and don't get me started on Tina Keeper up north). At least Linda West has some qualifications, even if they are from a diploma mill. But I guess with this guy in Transcona and Kennerd in Winnipeg South Center, that is probably the best the Tories can do. They know they'll never win on the issues so they're trying to win it like it is a popularity contests.

But on the plus side, I don't think the Tories can win this one, although it might be a bit closer this time around

[ 03 September 2008: Message edited by: genstrike ]

genstrike

Maloway won. [url=http://winnipegfreepress.com/local/story/4222986p-4860438c.html]Link[/url]

But maybe one of the others can get Maloway's old job as a consolation prize?

St. Paul's Prog...

quote:


Originally posted by ghoris:
[b]As someone posted on previous thread, Jim Maloway is the Tony Ruprecht of Manitoba politics.

The demographics suggest a safe NDP seat, but the Tories scored a surprisingly healthy 32% last time while Blaikie benefitted from a collapse in the Liberal vote.

Make no mistake, even with a mediocre candidate like Maloway, the NDP would be the odds-on favourite to win. But I expect a closer result than last time.[/b]


Bill Blaikie was my favourite MP. I hope this Maloway isn't anything like Tony Ruprecht!

jas

Sorry, but when I see the name 'Ruprecht' I can only think of Steve Martin in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels [img]smile.gif" border="0[/img]

jas

quote:


Originally posted by genstrike:
They know they'll never win on the issues so they're trying to win it like it is a popularity contests.

Unfortunately, I think that's often how Winnipeggers vote. Mayor Sam Katz, for example. Political credentials: owner of a baseball team. There's a bit of that old-style, small-town boosterism still detectable in Winnipeg. It's charming until you see it affecting civic policy and direction.

[ 08 September 2008: Message edited by: jas ]

genstrike

quote:


Originally posted by jas:
[b]

Unfortunately, I think that's often how Winnipeggers vote. Mayor Sam Katz, for example. Political credentials: owner of a baseball team. There's a bit of that old-style, small-town boosterism still detectable in Winnipeg. It's charming until you see it affecting civic policy and direction.

[ 08 September 2008: Message edited by: jas ][/b]


Yeah, I agree with you here. That is basically the only way you explain Sam Katz, or why the Tories are going for Steen in Transcona (even though he doesn't live there) and Kennerd in Winnipeg South Center. It also explains the whole Jets (non)issue last provincial election. But fortunately Transcona is a pretty safe riding and Maloway has managed to get over 60% in Elmlwood in the last 3 provincial elections, so I wouldn't worry too much about Steen taking it. The one to really watch in Manitoba is going to be Churchill (and to a lesser extent some of the Lib-Con races in the southern half ow Winnipeg)

ghoris

quote:


Originally posted by genstrike:
But fortunately Transcona is a pretty safe riding

Not anymore, it would seem.

NDP 14,355 45.8% (-5.0)
CPC 12,776 40.7% (+8.6)

What I've heard from folks back home who live in the riding is that although Steen had a lot of name recognition, most people felt he was a pretty weak candidate. However, Maloway was also regarded as pretty mediocre. I have heard from some reasonably reliable sources that there was a lot of grumbling among NDP/Blaikie supporters in the Transcona part of the riding, and a lot of them sat this one out, which could explain the closeness of the result. I have yet to see a poll-by-poll breakdown, but I'd wager dollars to donuts that Maloway did well in the western part of the riding but Steen won Transcona.

In some sense, both parties suffered from the weakness of their respective candidates. I think that if Linda West had run again for the Tories she would have won. Similarly, I think if the NDP had nominated a better candidate than Maloway, the result would not have been as close.

Stockholm

This was probably the Tories' one and only chance to win that riding. Maloway may be a mediocrity and a real waste of a safe NDP seat - but now's he's the incumbent and will be hard to dislodge and in the next election there is almost certain to be more discontent with the Tories than this time.

The 2008 election was almost certainly the high water mark for the Tories in Manitoba and saskatchewan and they probably have no where to go but down now.

ghoris

You could be right.

Believe it or not, the Tories did even better in both Manitoba and Saskatchewan in terms of the percentage of the popular vote than during the Mulroney sweep in 1984. Interestingly, the seat breakdown in Manitoba is exactly the same as 1984 while Saskatchewan was 9 PC and 5 NDP. (Of course, the federal NDP was much stronger in the Prairie provinces back then...)

Stockholm

I think its fair to say that the federal NDP was stronger in Saskatchewan in the 80s than it is now. I'm not so sure about whether you can say that about Manitoba or Alberta.

ghoris

Outside of its fortress in north-central Winnipeg, and the furthest northern reaches of the province, the federal NDP is basically not on the radar screen in Manitoba. In the 60s, 70s and early 80s, there were always at least one or two rural NDP seats in Manitoba and the NDP was competitive in west Winnipeg. The NDP managed 7 seats in 1980 but now they have basically reached their ceiling at 4.

I'll grant that the NDP's average vote in Alberta in the 80, 84 and 88 elections (14.1%) is only marginally better than 2008 (12.7%).

Stockholm

The one time that the federal NDP really cashed in in Manitoba was in 1980 - but that was largely because of a backlash against a wildly unpopular provincial Tory government led by Sterling Lyon. The NDp only won Churchill for the first time in 1979 - before that it was always a Tory seat.

While its true that the NDP won Selkirk off and on in the 60s and 70s - in those days the seat included a big chunk of northeastern Winnipeg that is now Elmwood-Transcona. The NDP was never competitive in west Winnipeg - that was always true blue Dan McKenzie country.

The NDP did come very close to winning Selkirk-Interlake again in 1997 - but that was with a four way split with strong PC, Reform and liberal candidates splitting the vote.

ghoris

quote:


Originally posted by Stockholm:
While its true that the NDP won Selkirk off and on in the 60s and 70s - in those days the seat included a big chunk of northeastern Winnipeg that is now Elmwood-Transcona.

Selkirk has never, to my knowledge, included Elmwood, East Kildonan or Transcona (the present day Elmwood-Transcona). It did include North Kildonan (the southeastern quadrant of present-day Kildonan-St.Paul) in the 60s and 70s. NK was then included with Elmwood, Transcona and EK from 1979 to 1984 in Bill Blaikie's old Winnipeg-Bird's Hill seat, then it was lumped back in with Selkirk again in the 1988 and 1993 elections as Selkirk-Red River until it was spun off again in 1997 into what is basically the current Kildonan-St. Paul seat.

quote:

The NDP was never competitive in west Winnipeg - that was always true blue Dan McKenzie country.

Au contraire. Cyril Keeper won Winnipeg-St. James in 1980 and the NDP finished a close second in 1979 and in 1984. Mackenzie's Winnipeg Assiniboine seat was the southern half of what is today Charleswood-St. James-Assinobine and the western half of Winnipeg South Centre, ie Charleswood, Tuxedo and River Heights. You're right that the NDP has never been competitive there, but it was won St. Charles, St. James-Assiniboia, Kirkfield Park and Westwood federally in the past (and now holds all the provincial seats in that area).

[ 05 November 2008: Message edited by: ghoris ]

Stockholm

The old riding of Winnipeg-St. James (which existed for about two elections) included a lot of what is now Winnipeg Centre. In 1988, the boundaries shifted west and Cyril Keeper switched to Winnipeg Centre (where he lost) because he knew that there was no chance of winning in a seat that actually went west at all.

Look at a map of the old Selkirk riding that existed up until 1979 - it went right into the centre of Winnipeg and was essentially an urban seat.

V. Jara

quote:


Originally posted by Stockholm:
[b]I think its fair to say that the federal NDP was stronger in Saskatchewan in the 80s than it is now. I'm not so sure about whether you can say that about Manitoba or Alberta.[/b]

The NDP was stronger in Alberta, both in terms of % of the vote and other measures. Grant Notley was the Alberta NDP leader during part of that period and very popular. His leadership helped the NDP to form the official opposition and win more seats than the provincial party even cares to dream of now. The seeds were sown for the Ross Harvey federal breakthrough in 1988. Part of what makes the NDP appear "strong" now is that the Liberals are so weak. The Federal party still has room to grow in ALberta.

V. Jara

P.S. Now that the Liberals have twice lost Winnipeg South (by progressively larger margins) and given that the provincial NDP has several strong (all female!) MLAs representing the riding and given that Rod Bruinooge is bit of a conservative zealot with anti-choice views, isn't it about time the Federal NDP took a real shot at that seat?

Aristotleded24

quote:


Originally posted by V. Jara:
[b]P.S. Now that the Liberals have twice lost Winnipeg South (by progressively larger margins) and given that the provincial NDP has several strong (all female!) MLAs representing the riding and given that Rod Bruinooge is bit of a conservative zealot with anti-choice views, isn't it about time the Federal NDP took a real shot at that seat?[/b]

Not under the current boundaries. The northwest portion of this riding includes very wealthy Winnipeg neighbourhoods (along with portions of the provincial seat of Manitoba PC leader Hugh McFadyen). They might go Liberal if the candidate was far enough right economically, but wouldn't go NDP. I know the NDP thought the Liberals would win and that they could push Bruinooge into third. Instead Bruinooge won by a larger margin than when he defeated Alcock.

[ 08 November 2008: Message edited by: Aristotleded24 ]

draftoswald

Looks like he's not retiring after all!

 http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Blaikie_.html

Excuse me, but hasn't his best before date come and gone? That would be a dream come true for McFayden. It's time for a woman who's worked hard and juggled a family to take over!

http://draftoswald.blogspot.com

genstrike

I think Blaikie would mop the floor with McFadyen in an election.  It's not that hard, McFadyen is an idiot.

But I wonder if his retirement was planned out?  Gary Doer trades Maloway for Blaikie?  If I were him, I'd make that trade.  Is Blaikie a successor in waiting?

And from the Draft Oswald blog:

"Theresa Oswald, a young mother, is the only potential leader who would
keep Manitoba going on the moderate path Gary Doer started us on."

That is not the path that Manitoba needs to be on.  We need to be on a path that is actually somewhat progressive.

Fidel

genstrike wrote:

That is not the path that Manitoba needs to be on.  We need to be on a path that is actually somewhat progressive.

Which province has the lowest overall cost of living? Did you apply for your 60% rebate on tuition fees this year and thanks to Doer's NDP?

Malcolm Malcolm's picture

Shouldn't this have been moved into the Western Canada category?

 

Oh, and V Jara - as much as I respect the late Grant Notley, he never led a caucus of more than two members.  He was killed in a plane crash some time before the election that saw an NDP breakthrough - yet ironically losing GN's old seat.

 

Grant's daughter, Rachel, is now an Alberta NDP MLA.

genstrike

I'm not having this silly argument with Fidel again, although I do think that a guy whose screenname is Fidel advocating a "moderate path" is one of those peculiar babble screenname ironies, like a guy named kropotkin favouring mandatory voting and arguing for more political action within the NDP.

But if you think Doer is doing great, by all means go for a leader who will keep you on a "moderate path".  If you don't want the NDP to accomplish anything worthwhile aside from not being McFuckhead, keep on the same path.  But if you want actual progressive change, pick a leader who is actually progressive or a social democrat.  Steve Ashton is probably the only progressive voice in the NDP caucus (partially because he predates the Doer era), although it is possible that there might be some newer MLAs who just haven't been able to speak up (Blady?).  And there is always Marianne Cerilli, although I'm pretty sure I'm the only person in Manitoba who thinks that is a good idea.

and this thread would probably be a better fit in the Prairies

jas

Hmm...which reminds me: I don't recall in all this hoopla over the
"coup d'etat" in Ottawa any Canadians fear-mongering about a "Central Canadian"-based takeover, did YOU Malcolm? Or anyone else? What was the divide everyone was speaking about? It wasn't East vs. West was it?? No, no, that can't be it. It was CENTRAL Canada vs. The West. Yeah, it was a takeover by Separatist Central Canadians. Right, Malcolm? 

In case you're wondering, see this thread. 

Malcolm Malcolm's picture

Some of us more cosmopoliitan westerners realize that our Atlantic Canadian brothers and sisters are equally oppressed (and perhaps even more so) by the odious central Canadian CABAL.

draftoswald

under Gary Doer's "right wing dictatorship" we've had a tuition freeze, kept our Crowns publicly owned, brought in a logging ban and a ban on hog farms that pollute Lake Winnipeg. If thats not progressive, i don't know what is.

 

We need the next leader to be from the Doer camp of the party or we'll love for sure and McFayden will be in. For us and most Manitobans, we're fine with this modest, progressive path that Doer started us on.

genstrike

draftoswald wrote:

under Gary Doer's "right wing dictatorship" we've had a tuition freeze, kept our Crowns publicly owned, brought in a logging ban and a ban on hog farms that pollute Lake Winnipeg. If thats not progressive, i don't know what is.

After 9 years, that isn't exactly a big list of accomplishments.  Doer didn't sell off any more Crowns?  Oh yeah, keeping the province the way Filmon left it, I'm so impressed.

Regarding tuition, freezing tuition at Filmon levels isn't necessarily all that progressive.  And even then, Doer has allowed universities to either target specific faculties, bring in new ancillary fees, and bring in racist international student fees.  The notion of having a "tuition freeze" is a sick joke to me and any student who has seen their tuition go up during the freeze.  If we have a tuition freeze, why does the university keep bringing in new fees, why did my fees increase by around $1500, and why have fees for some of my friends almost triple?

If logs and hogs are all Doer has to show after 9 years, he has failed.

Doer let social assistance payments stagnate for so long that the Chamber of Commerce had to call for increases.  When the fucking Chamber of Commerce has a better policy on social assistance than you, you've failed as a progressive.

That is the problem with Doer.  To his credit, he isn't Filmon, but he hasn't reversed much of what Filmon has done either.

And, just because I am starting to get the feel of this place, Fidel, Doer has eliminated $800 million through his own tax cuts which benefit the rich and corporations, so you can't blame everything Doer failed on on Mulroney or Martin.

 

The only person who is remotely progressive or could be called a social democrat in that caucus is Steve Ashton, who would easily own McFuckhead in a general election.  And if you keep the NDP going down the Doer path, fed-up progressives, social democrats and leftists will be abandoning the NDP in droves.  Already, Doer has turned student unions which used to be NDP farm teams into using "Stop NDP Lies" as a new slogan.  If there is no improvement by the next election, for the first time I will not vote NDP.  We will have to wait and see whether Blaikie might be a bit of an improvement, but if this thing was pre-arranged to coronate him as Doer's sucessor, I doubt it.

jas

genstrike wrote:

After 9 years, that isn't exactly a big list of accomplishments. Doer didn't sell off any more Crowns? Oh yeah, keeping the province the way Filmon left it, I'm so impressed.

Slow and steady appears to be winning the race. Doer's government has managed to appease the right wing with tax cuts while maintaining or increasing investment in infrastructure, education, health care, Crown energy projects, and environment, including being the first jurisdiction in Canada to establish a ministry of water stewardship.

I don't know about tuition fees, how they compare with fees of 10 years ago. I do know that Manitoba is still one of the cheapest provinces in the country to get a post-secondary education. Still in the three lowest. As well as being still one of the most affordable places to live and with one of the lowest rates of unemployment. If students here can't appreciate that, I encourage them to go to another province for their studies.

Manitobans pay the lowest hydro rates in North America. The Conservatives feel that Manitoba's cheap energy is "unfair" and that Hydro should be privatized so we can all pay "market" rates.

Just wondering: you say

Quote:
And if you keep the NDP going down the Doer path, fed-up progressives,
social democrats and leftists will be abandoning the NDP in droves.

Where will they go to?

 

genstrike

jas wrote:

Slow and steady appears to be winning the race. Doer's government has managed to appease the right wing with tax cuts while maintaining or increasing investment in infrastructure, education, health care, Crown energy projects, and environment, including being the first jurisdiction in Canada to establish a ministry of water stewardship.

I don't know about slow and steady, on a lot of issues Doer is either not moving or moving the wrong way.  But you have really hit on his strategy for winning elections.  Ditch progressive policies to appease the right so they can't complain.

jas wrote:
I don't know about tuition fees, how they compare with fees of 10 years
ago. I do know that Manitoba is still one of the cheapest provinces in
the country to get a post-secondary education. Still in the three
lowest. As well as being still one of the most affordable places to
live and with one of the lowest rates of unemployment.

Tuition has approximately broke even for most students, factoring in both inflation and increasing ancillary fees.  And Doer plans to scrap the freeze pretty soon (using his bullshit Levin commission as a crutch), so it will really go up next year.

But that is the point.  If you oppose Filmon's tuition increases, why would you support someone whose policy is not to keep tuition at Filmon levels?  Wouldn't you support lowering tuition to at least pre-Filmon levels?  And it's not just tuition, there are a load of other policies that Filmon brought in that Doer has made no effort to reverse.  You can't oppose Filmon's policies and support Doer's policies when Doer's policies are to keep Filmon's policies.

jas wrote:
If students here can't appreciate that, I encourage them to go to another province for their studies.

Right, love it or leave it.  Just because other provinces are worse doesn't mean we can't fight to make Manitoba better.

And it is sad when the NDP premier of Manitoba is raising tuition and the Conservative premier of Newfoundland is lowering it.  Is Danny Williams more progressive than Gary Doer?

Also, I should add that what Gary Doer did on tuition is almost exactly what McFadyen said he would do if elected.  But for some reason I can't figure out (perhaps because I judge politicians based on their actions and not on the colour of their ties), people think I should still support Doer.

jas wrote:
Manitobans pay the lowest hydro rates in North America. The
Conservatives feel that Manitoba's cheap energy is "unfair" and that
Hydro should be privatized so we can all pay "market" rates.

Yeah, I agree that Hydro is good, but Doer isn't progressing on that.  In fact, by using private development for wind farms instead of operating them as a public utility like the rest of Hydro.  The sad part is that if McFadyen or Filmon was doing it, the NDP opposition would (hopefully) be up in arms.

 

jas wrote:
Where will they go to?

Ah, the other part of Doer's strategy.  No matter how disappointed progressives are, he can always threaten us by saying McFadyen or Murray or Filmon or whichever Tory hack the PCs throw at us is worse.  Does McFadyen and Gerrard being worse make Doer any good?  No.

I know quite a few people who are voting Green or Communist or staying home.  I usually don't have either of the first two choices, so next provincial election I plan to occupy my couch instead of a voting booth, as it has about the same chance of effecting positive change.

 

Gary Doer is the Tony Blair of Manitoba politics.  If you guys want to keep supporting New Labour, go ahead, but don't expect me to support the NDP after they lied to me about issues which affect me directly.

genstrike

Fidel, I am not stupid, much less deliberately stupid, and I am not the one in this thread spamming for Theresa Oswald.  If anything, you are the one who is wilfully ignorant of anything that might be an imperfection in the NDP, therefore talking to you is like talking to a brick wall.

Fidel

genstrike wrote:

Gary Doer is the Tony Blair of Manitoba politics.  If you guys want to keep supporting New Labour, go ahead, but don't expect me to support the NDP after they lied to me about issues which affect me directly.

Your personal vendetta with the Manitoba NDP is beginning to look like spam. You repeat the same empty anti-NDP rhetoric over and over and over and refusing to admit that every other province isnt doing any better, and in most cases, waxing much worse than Manitoba's NDP has managed to deal with issues that matter to real Manitobans. Blair is a federal politician in Britain whereas Doer is a provincial premier. You anti-NDP trolls always mix up the two levels of government and confuse the roles of each with federal politics in other countries but never our own.

Fidel

According to the trolls, there is no role for federal government in Canada just other countries. And "Gary Doer is the root of all evil." Same-old spam over and over and over

genstrike

Ah, what's the use typing at a brick wall, especially when the trolls accuse you of trolling.  I don't even know why I post at this place anymore, it seems as though it is impossible to be critical of the NDP without stupid shit like this taking over the thread.  I'm going to bed.  Fuck you and good night.

genstrike

Blaikie won the nomination

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2008/12/14/man-blaikie.html

And there is the predictable whine of the right-wingers that he has too big of a pension.  Perhaps they should go whine about Rick Borotsik's pension instead, he's served at all three levels of government and was first elected two years earlier.

 

But this whole thing is rather curious in that it essentially was Blaikie and Maloway switching places (pending the by-election results, which will be a shoo-in).  I wonder if Doer is planning his retirement and wants Blaikie to be his successor?  The problem with that is that Blaikie is only a couple years younger than Doer.  Will this be Doer's last term?

draftoswald

Well it could be his last term, but going with Blakie is a bad choice. Yeah Borotsik takes a pension too but that doesnt make it right for Blakie. What will voters think? Does a man making $250,000 a year really represent them?

In our humble opinion we need a leader that keeps us on course. We cant go head to head with the tories with a leader that makes $250,000 a year. He'll be making 100,000 more than the Premier.

Stockholm

I think that ONLY consideration for the Manitoba NDP when it comes time to choose a new leader is who would make the best Premier. I really don't give a damn who has a better pension plan. I see no evidence that the voters give a damn how wealthy politicians are in deciding who to vote for. Right now, the most popular politician in Canada is Danny Williams (also knows as Danny MILLION) because he is so rich. Doesn't seem to bother the Newfies at all.

Even if Blaikie collects a good pension - I'm sure he has a far more humble lifestyle than whatever used car dealer the Tories have leading them next time around.

Vansterdam Kid

genstrike wrote:

Regarding tuition, freezing tuition at Filmon levels isn't necessarily
all that progressive.  And even then, Doer has allowed universities to
either target specific faculties, bring in new ancillary fees, and
bring in racist international student fees.  The notion of having a
"tuition freeze" is a sick joke to me and any student who has seen
their tuition go up during the freeze.  If we have a tuition freeze,
why does the university keep bringing in new fees, why did my fees
increase by around $1500, and why have fees for some of my friends
almost triple?

Um, how exactly is charging international students more 'racist'? It's done EVERYWHERE. It's not "unprogressive" or something to charge international students more. It would only be racist if these international students became Canadian citizens and then were still charged more. I've thought about going to LSE, and I'm pretty sure they'd charge me more than they would a Brit. While I think the fees are high, I sure as hell wouldn't claim they're high because they're "racist." This is just an embarrassing thing for you to say, and I'm sure you could come up with other criticisms (which you have) of the Doer NDP education policy.

In any case domestic students are subsidized by the taxpayer because it's assumed that educated Canadians will stay within Canada, thus improving society. It wouldn't make sense for us to subsidize international students who for the most part do not have plans to stay in Canada. If they plan to stay in Canada, they can become Canadians, or at the very least permanent residents.

genstrike

Vansterdam Kid wrote:
Um, how exactly is charging international students more 'racist'?

These fees (and other international student issues) are only there because international students are easy to target.  This is partly due to them not having a say in the political systemand partly due to nativist and racist sentiments floating around in the general population, some students, and decision-makers.  Universities were encouraged to use international students as cash cows under Filmon, and Doer has allowed this to continue by exempting international students from the protection of the tuition freeze.

Admittedly, it isn't completely based on racism, but it does play a part in the political convenience of international fees.  Trust me, I've seen racism around the tuition issue before.

Vansterdam Kid wrote:
It's done EVERYWHERE. It's not "unprogressive" or something to charge international students more.

Wrong and wrong.  There are many universities and jurisdictions which do not have international student differential fees.  Some, such as Sweden, even have zero tuition and no international student fees.  And I would say that charging international students nearly triple already-high tuition based on where they were born is not progressive at all, but that's just my opinion.  Of course, everyone has different definitions of progressive.  Heck, some people even think Doer is progressive.

Vansterdam Kid wrote:
In any case domestic students are subsidized by the taxpayer because
it's assumed that educated Canadians will stay within Canada, thus
improving society. It wouldn't make sense for us to
subsidize international students who for the most part do not have
plans to stay in Canada.

It doesn't make sense for us to be chasing away people who are obviously motivated to improve their skills by discouraging them from getting an education and settling in Canada with these high fees.  It is people who have studied and worked in Canada who have the least difficulty integrating with society, so it doesn't make sense to be putting up barriers to prevent people from studying in Canada.

Vansterdam Kid wrote:
If they plan to stay in Canada, they can become Canadians, or at the very least permanent residents.

Do you qualify for permanent residence in Canada?  I took the test and I don't.  I took it again based on where I will be when I graduate (a bit more work experience and a degree) and I still don't qualify.  If you have a degree, did you qualify before you started post-secondary education?

How exactly is someone supposed to become a permanent resident to study when the restrictions are so stringent that they probably won't qualify, especially if they are applying to study for their first degree.

jas

You have a point, but Manitoba already provides an edge for both domestic and international students just in its lower cost of living.  Manitoba also already has a problem with grad drain. Educating people for much cheaper than it would cost them to be educated elsewhere, only to have them leave for another province after. 

 

ecopinko

jas wrote:

Manitoba also already has a problem with grad drain. Educating people for much cheaper than it would cost them to be educated elsewhere, only to have them leave for another province after.  

Canadian students also have the ability to leave the province after graduation, thus 'sticking' MB with the bill for subsidizing their education, but no one is suggesting we charge them triple tuition.

Secondly, much of the argument for int'l student tuition differential comes from the idea that 'they' haven't contributed to province through taxes and whatnot. Of course, if we implemented that idea consistently and without targeting international students, every kid from a working-class or poor background would also be required to pay more in tuition - after all, their parents haven't contributed very much at all to the provincial tax base!

(Edited to add second point, which occured to me after hitting `post`).

jas

ecopinko wrote:

Canadian students also have the ability to leave the province after graduation, thus 'sticking' MB with the bill for subsidizing their education, but no one is suggesting we charge them triple tuition.

Actually, manitoba has a programme that offers a 60% rebate on tuition fees if students stay in Manitoba after graduating. Not sure what the timeframe is for that.  

Quote:
Secondly, much of the argument for int'l student tuition differential comes from the idea that 'they' haven't contributed to province through taxes and whatnot. Of course, if we implemented that idea consistently and without targeting international students, every kid from a working-class or poor background would also be required to pay more in tuition - after all, their parents haven't contributed very much at all to the provincial tax base!

Yeah, that's a great idea. 

Undecided