Can good news happen in a pandemic?

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Pondering

That really is good news. Even if it only impacts some people it is still positive news. 

Aristotleded24

It's a bit of a morale boost for sure. Still a bit worried about the cardiac impacts of covid, even among people who aren't hospitalized. That kind of damage tends to be more permanent. Researching these impacts, mitigation, or even if we can find out if some people are at greater risks of post-covid heart problems will be very useful.

That said, it is still early days. We could find that the long-term impacts of covid are actually worse than what we are seeing right now. Either way, research into therapeutics and mitigation of long term effects should be a priority.

Aristotleded24

Is voting during a pandemic really that dangerous?

Quote:

B.C.'s deputy provincial health officer, Dr. Reka Gustafson, said she's "not particularly concerned about COVID-19 transmission during the election."

“The very basic things that you can do in public, in a grocery store are proven to be very effective,” Gustafson said. “There’s been a lot of conversation with elections officials to makes sure voting is safe. The things that we need to do to keep safe are quite simple. We’ve spent a lot of time focussing on these casual contacts we have with individuals, but the vast majority of COVID-19 is transmitted in very close quarters.”

Aristotleded24

Despite record covid surge, Manitoba schools holding up well:

Quote:
Five weeks of classes, two incubation periods, and a single severe COVID-19 outbreak at a school later, medical experts suggest the return of tens of thousands of students in Manitoba this fall hasn't had a remarkable effect on the growing COVID-19 caseload.

Aristotleded24

Junior hockey is back in Manitoba:

Quote:

The 2020-21 regular season schedule has been significantly modified for the upcoming season from previous seasons with the health and safety of everyone involved being the number one priority.

“In the course of our planning for the upcoming season, it became clear that we had to further self-impose schedule modifications and restrictions to ensure that we were moving forward in a safe, structured and responsible manner.” stated MJHL Commissioner Kevin Saurette.  “Each organization is to be commended for their absolute commitment to providing players with a safe development opportunity on and off the ice in the face of the difficult challenges ahead.”

The schedule will span over 22 weekends beginning on October 9th and ending on March 13th.

Aristotleded24

Junior hockey is coming back in Western Canada:

Quote:

The WHL continues  to work with each of the Governments and Health Authorities in the Provinces and States in Western Canada and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, respectively, on obtaining the necessary approvals to commence play. Details regarding the schedule of games in each of the four WHL Divisions will be announced at a later date.

The WHL has agreed that all Regular Season games during the 2020-21 season will be played exclusively within the boundaries of each of the four Divisions, with the East Division consisting of the seven Saskatchewan and Manitoba-based teams; the Central Division consisting of the five Alberta-based teams; the B.C. Division consisting of the five B.C.-based teams; and the U.S. Division consisting of the five teams located in Washington and Oregon.

Good for them, life has to go on at some point. It was also very good planning to have the divisions play within their own boundaries, because that takes into account that the border may still be closed when the season opens.

Aristotleded24

Saskatchewan hockey league returns, with spectators:

Quote:

The Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League announced its return-to-play guidelines earlier this week — and fans of the league should be happy as they'll be able to attend games in some capacity. 

Up to 150 people will be allowed to attend games. People who attend will be required to wear masks and abide by physical distancing regulations.

While fan attendance will be limited, there's a chance it could be increased if things go smoothly. 

"We may be able to expand it to 50 per cent [arena capacity] but right now we're going with the 150,"  Doug Johnson, the general manager and head coach of the Nipawin Hawks said. 

"That, through a whole year, would be unsustainable."

Aristotleded24

Open Street project in Winnipeg mostly successful:

Quote:
Nearly 80 per cent of people who used the service said they had a positive or very positive experience, according to a report looking into extending the pilot project table to the Standing Policy Committee on Infrastructure Renewal and Public Works.

Overall, cyclists had the best experience on the open streets. The report said 95 per cent of the cyclists who used the streets as a cyclist said it was positive, saying it felt safe to use the street and appreciated the reduced traffic.

Drivers were not as enthusiastic, with nearly half the drivers on the streets reporting a negative experience.

Drivers said they could not drive more than a block, vehicle traffic increased on surrounding streets, and pedestrians and cyclists on the streets weren’t following the rules.

 

While the project received mostly positive feedback, there were some problems.

The report said the city was told of various “verbal altercations” involving drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians using the streets.

 

 “The verbal conflicts were generally related to people observing vehicles travelling longer than one block and people not moving or slowly moving out of the way of a passing vehicle,” the report said, adding one crash between a car and a cyclist was reported as well.

Aristotleded24

Some snowbirds still going south for the winter:

Quote:

In anticipation of the winter travel season, the federal government has issued an online alert to seniors, advising them to stay home during the COVID-19 pandemic. But the message may have little impact on snowbirds who are determined to escape the Canadian winter. 

"I don't like winter. I hate it. I hate it with a passion," said Steve MacDonald, 77, of Oakville, Ont. He has already booked a Dec. 3 flight to Florida for himself and his wife, so they can spend the winter at their rented condo in Key Largo.

"Down there, [I'll] be swimming outside and taking in some sun, getting some vitamin D and cheap rum."

He'll be in good company. The Canadian Snowbird Association estimates that around 30 per cent of its more than 110,000 members will head to the United States Sunbelt this winter — despite soaring COVID-19 cases in the country and the Canada-U.S. land border closure to non-essential traffic.

Snowbirds can still fly to the U.S. and ship their cars. But the Canadian government is asking seniors to think twice before leaving the country, because their age makes them more susceptible to falling seriously ill from COVID-19. 

...

In September, travel insurance broker Martin Firestone told CBC News that less than 10 per cent of his 1,000 snowbird clients were heading south. But now, he said, close to one third are packing their bags.

"They're bucking the odds. They're basically saying, 'I'm going to go down there, and I'm going to be fine.'"

...

Even snowbirds who learn of the government's advice may still choose to ignore it, convinced that the benefits of going south this winter outweigh the risks. 

Although CBC News informed snowbird Sandy Munro of the posted alert for travelling seniors, he's still bent on going to his condo in Naples, Fla., in February. He said he'd go sooner but has family commitments keeping him in Canada for the next couple of months. 

"I can only take so much of winter," said Munro, 69, of Aurora, Ont.

He argues he'll actually be safer in Florida, because he suffers from a lung disorder, which worsens in cold weather. 

"As long as I'm in my little gated community — being COVID-aware — then I think my life expectancy would be longer by spending the winter down there," he said.

These people are much braver than I am to go on a plane right now, especially since age is a risk factor. But there is a big link between vitamin D deficiency and the risk of covid mortality. I hope these people enjoy their time, that going makes them healthier overall, and that increase in health contributes to the overall population health that will put all of us in a better position against this pandemic.

Aristotleded24

CFL unveils plans for 2021:

Quote:

The Canadian Football League is ready for a comeback.

On Friday, the league announced its 2021 schedule with the first game of the season featuring a 2019 Grey Cup rematch between the Hamilton Tiger-Cats and champion Winnipeg Blue Bombers on Thursday, June 10. 

The season will conclude in late November with the 2021 Grey Cup being played in Hamilton on Sunday, Nov. 21 at Tim Hortons Field. 

"We're looking forward to hosting our comeback season in our stadiums, in front of our fans," said Randy Ambrosie, commissioner of the CFL.

"With this schedule, we're signalling that we're looking forward with optimism to playing in 2021."

...

While there are some small changes, the new comeback schedule is laced with many CFL traditions.

There is a full slate of classic matchups on Labour Day Weekend with the Montreal Alouettes visiting the Ottawa Redblacks on Friday, Sept. 3, the Saskatchewan Roughriders hosting the Bombers on Sunday, Sept. 5 and a doubleheader on the holiday, Monday, Sept. 6, with the Toronto Argos in Hamilton and Edmonton playing the Stamnpeders in Calgary.

This is awesome news! As much of a debacle as the new stadium construction was, I can't wait for a chance to see the Bombers in the stands. It may even be better for the CFL in the long term if it can capitalize on the pent-up demand for live entertainment that has been building.

Aristotleded24

Religious freedom restored in New York state:

Quote:
In a 5-4 ruling, the US Supreme Court sided with religious organizations in a dispute over Covid-19 restrictions put in place by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo limiting the number of people attending religious services.

The case is the latest pitting religious groups against city and state officials seeking to stop the spread of Covid-19, and it highlights the impact of Justice Amy Coney Barrett on the court. The decision comes as coronavirus cases surge across the country.

In the late-night decision, Barrett sided with her conservative colleagues in the dispute, while Chief Justice John Roberts joined the three liberal justices in dissent.

Last spring and summer, before the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the court split 5-4 on similar cases out of California and Nevada, with Roberts and the liberals in the majority siding against houses of worship. Barrett was confirmed in October to take Ginsburg's seat.

This is awesome news, along with the fact that many people decided for themselves how they wanted to celebrate Thanksgiving with their relatives. Will there be some spread of covid because of this? Probably. But many states have also entered a downswing in the number of new cases, which leads me to believe the current wave is at its crest in the US. I will certainly keep an eye on this. How will the suppressionists react if the downward trend in cases continues, despite the restrictions being lifted and people celebrating Thanksgiving?

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Awesome news if you are a coronavirus, or a religious fanatic.

Aristotleded24

Michael Moriarity wrote:
Awesome news if you are a coronavirus, or a religious fanatic.

Or an advocate for basic human rights.

kropotkin1951

Aristotleded24 wrote:

But many states have also entered a downswing in the number of new cases, which leads me to believe the current wave is at its crest in the US. I will certainly keep an eye on this. How will the suppressionists react if the downward trend in cases continues, despite the restrictions being lifted and people celebrating Thanksgiving?

Good question because it is clear that some people will discount the significance of the numbers if the cases rise. Hopefully the community first people will be more open minded than the COVID deniers and anti-maskers who don't care about actual numbers.

Aristotleded24

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

But many states have also entered a downswing in the number of new cases, which leads me to believe the current wave is at its crest in the US. I will certainly keep an eye on this. How will the suppressionists react if the downward trend in cases continues, despite the restrictions being lifted and people celebrating Thanksgiving?

Good question because it is clear that some people will discount the significance of the numbers if the cases rise. Hopefully the community first people will be more open minded than the COVID deniers and anti-maskers who don't care about actual numbers.

The orthodoxy on the left these days seems to be that covid is a unique threat to human existence and that all the stops need to be pulled out in order to stop spread from happening, and any other threat to human health and well-being is discounted. Anyone who questions this orthodoxy or even the idea that the measures enacted are effective is branded an insensitive person who doesn't care about old people, and labelled a "covid denier" Who's being closed-minded in this discussion?

Besides, New York state had one of the strictest lockdowns in the United States, and if you check the Worldometers page, it will show that it holds second place in terms of covid deaths per total population. Since it had the big wave in the spring but cases have gone down, I can only presume that it has held that position for a long time. The other states that were more relaxed have a long way to go before they catch up to that level.

kropotkin1951

Aristotleded24 wrote:

The orthodoxy on the left these days seems to be that covid is a unique threat to human existence and that all the stops need to be pulled out in order to stop spread from happening, and any other threat to human health and well-being is discounted. Anyone who questions this orthodoxy or even the idea that the measures enacted are effective is branded an insensitive person who doesn't care about old people, and labelled a "covid denier" Who's being closed-minded in this discussion?

I am not made of straw so frankly it seems that your arguments don't apply to anything I have written.

Bacchus

Aristotleded24 wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

But many states have also entered a downswing in the number of new cases, which leads me to believe the current wave is at its crest in the US. I will certainly keep an eye on this. How will the suppressionists react if the downward trend in cases continues, despite the restrictions being lifted and people celebrating Thanksgiving?

Good question because it is clear that some people will discount the significance of the numbers if the cases rise. Hopefully the community first people will be more open minded than the COVID deniers and anti-maskers who don't care about actual numbers.

The orthodoxy on the left these days seems to be that covid is a unique threat to human existence and that all the stops need to be pulled out in order to stop spread from happening, and any other threat to human health and well-being is discounted. Anyone who questions this orthodoxy or even the idea that the measures enacted are effective is branded an insensitive person who doesn't care about old people, and labelled a "covid denier" Who's being closed-minded in this discussion?

Besides, New York state had one of the strictest lockdowns in the United States, and if you check the Worldometers page, it will show that it holds second place in terms of covid deaths per total population. Since it had the big wave in the spring but cases have gone down, I can only presume that it has held that position for a long time. The other states that were more relaxed have a long way to go before they catch up to that level.

Two of the worst states are New York and California. Also the 2 biggest states in population. Coincidence? I think not

Aristotleded24

Bacchus wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

But many states have also entered a downswing in the number of new cases, which leads me to believe the current wave is at its crest in the US. I will certainly keep an eye on this. How will the suppressionists react if the downward trend in cases continues, despite the restrictions being lifted and people celebrating Thanksgiving?

Good question because it is clear that some people will discount the significance of the numbers if the cases rise. Hopefully the community first people will be more open minded than the COVID deniers and anti-maskers who don't care about actual numbers.

The orthodoxy on the left these days seems to be that covid is a unique threat to human existence and that all the stops need to be pulled out in order to stop spread from happening, and any other threat to human health and well-being is discounted. Anyone who questions this orthodoxy or even the idea that the measures enacted are effective is branded an insensitive person who doesn't care about old people, and labelled a "covid denier" Who's being closed-minded in this discussion?

Besides, New York state had one of the strictest lockdowns in the United States, and if you check the Worldometers page, it will show that it holds second place in terms of covid deaths per total population. Since it had the big wave in the spring but cases have gone down, I can only presume that it has held that position for a long time. The other states that were more relaxed have a long way to go before they catch up to that level.

Two of the worst states are New York and California. Also the 2 biggest states in population. Coincidence? I think not

Deaths per capita, Bacchus. Not total raw numbers, deaths per capita. It's easily available on Worldomoeters. Note that in addition to New York, the top 10 list of deaths per capita includes the smaller states of Mississippi, Alabama, and the Dakotas. California ranks 38th on that metric as of today.

Aristotleded24

Some relatively good news from Manitoba:

Quote:
An outbreak at a personal care home in Opaskwayak Cree Nation, where the military was brought in after every resident tested positive for COVID-19, is now over.

Onekanew (Chief) Christian Sinclair said one resident of the Rod McGillivary Memorial Care Home passed away and 27 others have fully recovered.

"It provides a lot of relief and comfort for our membership," Sinclair said.

"It's now just making sure that it doesn't get out of control again ... and learning from this as they move forward."

All infected staff have also recovered and have returned to work, he added.

...

On Friday, when it was announced that all 27 residents and staff had been cleared for the virus, the soldiers were thanked with a traditional ceremony.

Sinclair said chief and council, alongside care home staff gifted the soldiers traditional items such as mukluks and moccasins made by local artists.  

"Just a small way of saying thank you for your contribution," he said.

"They all had an opportunity to say a few words which was really a nice gesture, especially when we look at the history of the Canadian military with First Nations in Canada. We also see this as an opportunity to rebuild those relationships."

Aristotleded24

So I look at covid numbers on a daily basis from a number of places. Here is where things stand globally as of today:

On December 22, the 7 day average of new cases peaked at approximately 648 000 cases. Since then, it has fallen off. This follows several periods of slowing growth, and even a couple of declines. I know it's early days, but based on these numbers, I am confident going out on a limb and suggesting that the first wave of the pandemic has passed. I believe we are entering what if this was an influenza pandemic the World Health Organization would classify as the post-pandemic phase. I really hope this trend continues and that we see new cases continue to fall off.

Aristotleded24

Where the spirit of The Lord is, there is freedom:

Quote:
A federal appeals court again struck down Gov. Andrew Cuomo's strict capacity limits on religious services in areas with high rates of COVID-19, ruling Monday that the restrictions discriminate against religious rights.

A three-judge panel from the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan ruled against Cuomo's 10- and 25-person limits on houses of worship in state-designated "red" and "orange" zones, overturning a lower court's ruling and granting a request from Catholic and Orthodox Jewish organizations to have the limits invalidated.

The ruling came a month after the U.S. Supreme Court issued a temporary injunction blocking New York from enforcing the limits, which remained in effect while the lower-level court considered the case.

In the ruling Monday, the circuit court judges sided with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and Agudath Israel of America, which argued the capacity limits violated the First Amendment by singling out religious institutions for greater scrutiny than many organizations the state deemed "essential" during the coronavirus pandemic.

Aristotleded24

BC almost clears backlog from surgeries postponed earlier last year:

Quote:

Ninety per cent of patients whose surgeries were delayed during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic last spring were able to have their procedures finished by late November, the province said Wednesday.

Health Minister Adrian Dix said the progress was "remarkable."

"These are significant achievements and our work will continue to build on this progress in the winter-to-spring period," Dix said during a news conference.

More than 32,400 people had their surgeries postponed or not scheduled at all, after the province cancelled scheduled procedures on March 16, bringing the total number of people waiting for surgery in B.C. to 93,000.

The ministry said a total 163,696 people received their surgeries between May 18 — the day surgeries started up again — and Nov. 22. Roughly 29,100 of those people were among those who had their procedures delayed in the spring.

They accomplished all that with a second wave that has resulted in record numbers of covid cases, hospitalizations, and patients in the ICU. Well done. That's how you manage a pandemic, at least from the perspective of increasing the capacity within your health care system.

Aristotleded24

If you lost your sense of smell, can you recover it?

Quote:

While olfactory training is not a guaranteed solution for everyone, it does present a method that has worked for some in the past and can be done at home.

"In some patients, there is a good recovery in their sense of smell, albeit usually slow," said Tewfik.

Tewfik says olfactory training is easy to try at home. All it takes is five mason jars filled with strong smelling natural ingredients like coffee beans, cinnamon sticks, lemon juice or cloves.

"You take five odorants from around the kitchen and you put them in mason jars and you smell them twice a day for several months."

He suggests repeating this for at least three months.

"You smell them for a little bit every day, twice a day, and that would usually stimulate the nerve cells in the nose to regenerate," said Tewfik.

He warns against using anything chemical like Windex, and advises people stick to natural products.

This is one expert suggestion, and we can't draw generalizations from this. Having said that, this is a vitally important question we need to address and find answers for.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Are you suggesting it's not important to study loss of smell or how to recover it? Smell is the sense most closely tied to long term memory so I would say that is important. Also the inability to smell properly can impact your desire to eat, so again very important. Smell is also critical to detecting danger - smoke, food gone bad, etc.

Aristotleded24

laine lowe wrote:
Are you suggesting it's not important to study loss of smell or how to recover it?

No, not by any stretch of the imagination. This is a "good news" thread, so since loss of smell is one of the after effects of covid, I thought I would share a "good news" story about how to get it back. This expert has come up with an idea, so it should be investigated to see if it works. What can we learn from this? That's where I was going?

While we're at it, since loss of smell is on everybody's mind because it is a big red flag for covid, can this raise the public profile of this issue and be of use to people who lost their sense of smell for other reasons?

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

Oh okay. It is good news that they study pathways to recovering the sense of smell. I think most other reasons for this loss are related to neurological issues or else impacts/side effects due to chemotherapy and other treatments.

Aristotleded24

Some Albertans are able to have fun despite the pandemic:

Quote:
Even as record COVID-19 cases are recorded in Alberta, people are continuing to gather in large numbers, defying the rules.

A rodeo near the community of Bowden drew hundreds of people this weekend despite the province recording a record number of new COVID-19 cases on Saturday.

The event was called the No More Lockdown Rodeo Rally.

I hope this rodeo has the same impact in Canada as the SuperBowl had in the United States. Florida had a normal-ish Super Bowl, complete with celebrating in the streets this past winter. There was so much handwringing about covid spread, there was going to be disaster. "Wait 2 weeks!" is what they say. Well, 2 weeks came, and nothing happened. That was all it took for the lockdowns to crumble. States began opening up and easing restrictions, and there was no going back. Personally, I don't think the rodeo is going to contibute to any spread. The chances of spreading covid outside have been documented to be 1 in 7300. This is about the same time that the curve in Alberta started falling off this time last year, and the time of year we generally expect to see respiratory infections decline. Everyone is going to be keeping an eye on the numbers, and if the 2-week mark passes without anything bad happening, I think that might tip off a similar cascade in Canada, where people start questioning lockdowns in larger numbers and becoming more vocal in demanding an end to restrictions.

Aristotleded24

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Some Albertans are able to have fun despite the pandemic:

Quote:
Even as record COVID-19 cases are recorded in Alberta, people are continuing to gather in large numbers, defying the rules.

A rodeo near the community of Bowden drew hundreds of people this weekend despite the province recording a record number of new COVID-19 cases on Saturday.

The event was called the No More Lockdown Rodeo Rally.

I hope this rodeo has the same impact in Canada as the SuperBowl had in the United States. Florida had a normal-ish Super Bowl, complete with celebrating in the streets this past winter. There was so much handwringing about covid spread, there was going to be disaster. "Wait 2 weeks!" is what they say. Well, 2 weeks came, and nothing happened. That was all it took for the lockdowns to crumble. States began opening up and easing restrictions, and there was no going back. Personally, I don't think the rodeo is going to contibute to any spread. The chances of spreading covid outside have been documented to be 1 in 7300. This is about the same time that the curve in Alberta started falling off this time last year, and the time of year we generally expect to see respiratory infections decline. Everyone is going to be keeping an eye on the numbers, and if the 2-week mark passes without anything bad happening, I think that might tip off a similar cascade in Canada, where people start questioning lockdowns in larger numbers and becoming more vocal in demanding an end to restrictions.

It has been 2 weeks, the time period in which disease spread should be detected. Let's check back and see what happened.

New covid cases in Alberta May 1: 2433

New covid cases in Alberta May 15: 1195

Cases continue to drop even after a so-called superspreader event. The lockdown house of cards continues to tumble.

Aristotleded24

This is interesting:

Quote:

After a year of frightening headlines, widespread concern, and countless retweets that the virus that causes Covid-19 may attack the heart more aggressively than any other viral illness, the verdict is in: It doesn’t.

A report published last week in the journal JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging made that verdict blatantly clear.

It’s time to set the record straight on Covid-19 and the heart, and to consider the lessons for how science is communicated to the public.

Pondering

You are still looking for guarantees. Not all large events turn into super-spreaders. It is estimated that only 20% of infected people are responsible for 80% of transmission. 

Aristotleded24

Pondering wrote:
You are still looking for guarantees. Not all large events turn into super-spreaders. It is estimated that only 20% of infected people are responsible for 80% of transmission.

We can easily apply that standard to criminal justice. Many people caught committing violent crime in Winnipeg are in violation of court orders imposed for previous arrests. Not all people who are arrested for a crime end up violating their court conditions, but a few do. The solution, then, is to automatically detain anyone arrested of a crime in jail until their trial happens, because you just never know. If you tried to set up that kind of system in Winnipeg, that would have a great deal of public support.

kropotkin1951

Aristotleded24

Per Worldometers:

7 day average of new cases worldwide as of May 27: 538 276

Down from a peak on April 29: 828 545

Global cases of covid continue to decline, led by India and the United States. The trend of new infections seems to now closely mirror the predictable infection curves of respiratory diseases in every country. Hopefully this trend continues and the World Heatlh Organization soon sees fit to declare either post peak or post pandemic phase of this virus.

Pondering

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Pondering wrote:
You are still looking for guarantees. Not all large events turn into super-spreaders. It is estimated that only 20% of infected people are responsible for 80% of transmission.

We can easily apply that standard to criminal justice. Many people caught committing violent crime in Winnipeg are in violation of court orders imposed for previous arrests. Not all people who are arrested for a crime end up violating their court conditions, but a few do. The solution, then, is to automatically detain anyone arrested of a crime in jail until their trial happens, because you just never know. If you tried to set up that kind of system in Winnipeg, that would have a great deal of public support.

That makes absolutely no sense. Public health and criminal justice could not be more different from one another.  Crime has not risen to pandemic proportions.  People are not being put in prison. Apples and oranges.

Aristotleded24

Check out this chart here. It classifies the covid trends in different countries by 3 different colours: green means (almost) zero covid, yellow means it's under control, and red means it is moving widely through the country. The colour code of any country can change along with the trends. Look at the lines on the chart. Overall, this chart is currently showing the most hopeful trends of covid spread in each country since well before the pandemic was declared.

earthquakefish

Well, are they not at all relative to each other?  If you include economic well being, social connectivity into public health those often marginalized commit more crime?  Is there not an observation there?   Is it the same, a virus regardless of your political stripe may catch you, or how well you safeguard yourself?

And coincidentally, those who have to go to work now often are paid less and catch the virus more.  At least in Ontario for months now it has felt like class warfare, those the government chooses needs to be at work are forced, while those who can work from home (often making more) can with less risk. 

In context, in a way, government is choosing solutions they find affordable, which jailing people (hardly ever is) is the government choosing the same.  Now it's about how many you connect with, follow public health while no person is the same in their needs socially.  One can live alone be happy. One can live alone, be in despair - but that conversation in questioning needs of a person are entirely not listened to.

And I am generalising some - but often their is roots socially, societally, in crime rates.

It's not quite apple and oranges while maybe not a perfect comparison.

 

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Pondering wrote:
You are still looking for guarantees. Not all large events turn into super-spreaders. It is estimated that only 20% of infected people are responsible for 80% of transmission.

We can easily apply that standard to criminal justice. Many people caught committing violent crime in Winnipeg are in violation of court orders imposed for previous arrests. Not all people who are arrested for a crime end up violating their court conditions, but a few do. The solution, then, is to automatically detain anyone arrested of a crime in jail until their trial happens, because you just never know. If you tried to set up that kind of system in Winnipeg, that would have a great deal of public support.

That makes absolutely no sense. Public health and criminal justice could not be more different from one another.  Crime has not risen to pandemic proportions.  People are not being put in prison. Apples and oranges.

[/quote]

Ken Burch

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Per Worldometers:

7 day average of new cases worldwide as of May 27: 538 276

Down from a peak on April 29: 828 545

Global cases of covid continue to decline, led by India and the United States. The trend of new infections seems to now closely mirror the predictable infection curves of respiratory diseases in every country. Hopefully this trend continues and the World Heatlh Organization soon sees fit to declare either post peak or post pandemic phase of this virus.

Any decline was due to vaccination.  Viruses NEVER just go away on their own- or at best, not until they exact an intolerably high price, as the 1919 flu pandemic did-a pandemic which ended up infectiong a third of the human population before being stopped by public health measures.

lagatta4

Vaccination, and other public health measures, are the only "good news". It seems strange how quickly memories of the flu pandemic a century ago were sidelined or repressed as memories.

Aristotleded24

Ken Burch wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Per Worldometers:

7 day average of new cases worldwide as of May 27: 538 276

Down from a peak on April 29: 828 545

Global cases of covid continue to decline, led by India and the United States. The trend of new infections seems to now closely mirror the predictable infection curves of respiratory diseases in every country. Hopefully this trend continues and the World Heatlh Organization soon sees fit to declare either post peak or post pandemic phase of this virus.

Any decline was due to vaccination.

We've seen several places where the virus spiked post-vaccination, including in our own country, Chile, and Seychels.

There will be different rates of people vaccinated in the United States depending on region, and most likely, which party the people in each state vote for. It will be interesting to see which states see higher incidences of covid come fall: the vaccinated or unvaccinated states.

Aristotleded24

The United Kingdom recently hit an important milestone:

Quote:

The UK has reported zero daily coronavirus-related deaths for the first time since the pandemic began, but the health secretary has warned "we haven't beaten this virus yet".

According to the latest government data, 3,165 new COVID-19 cases were also recorded in the latest 24-hour period.

Meanwhile, although the situation isn't particularly great where I live, trends of new cases in Canada continue to take a steep decline. On the present trajectory, I'm confident that most provinces will be reporting new daily case totals close to or less than 100 in a period of weeks.

JKR

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Meanwhile, although the situation isn't particularly great where I live, trends of new cases in Canada continue to take a steep decline. On the present trajectory, I'm confident that most provinces will be reporting new daily case totals close to or less than 100 in a period of weeks.

Thank goodness the vaccines so far are working so well!

Aristotleded24

When checking the charts for the third wave in this country, I noticed that the death toll during the third wave was not nearly as high as it was in the first 2. We appear to have broken the link between covid infection and mortality.

JKR

Correct. The vaccines are helping.

Aristotleded24

JKR wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Meanwhile, although the situation isn't particularly great where I live, trends of new cases in Canada continue to take a steep decline. On the present trajectory, I'm confident that most provinces will be reporting new daily case totals close to or less than 100 in a period of weeks.

Thank goodness the vaccines so far are working so well!

Seven-day average of new cases as of June 9: 1646 Much lower than the low point of 2687 recorded on February 15, and still falling.

JKR

The anti-Vaxxers have been proven wrong again!

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Here's something I think we're going to see a lot more of soon. 92 per cent of new cases in Sask. last month contracted by unvaccinated individuals: health ministry. In the near future, all reports on new infections will include how many of them were vaccinated.

Francois Biber of CTV wrote:

During the month of May, a whopping majority of new cases and hospitalizations in Saskatchewan were among those who had not received a first dose of the vaccine or had received a first dose within three weeks.

According to the province 92 per cent of 5,296 new cases in May were among individuals who had not been vaccinated. In the same timeframe 81 per cent of hospitalizations in Saskatchewan were people who were unvaccinated.

Unvaccinated individuals also made up 87 per cent of intensive-care patients, according to the Ministry of Health.

NDPP

Biden is apparently planning to pressure Trudeau at the G7 to relax existing border restrictions. That would be madness and would guarantee us a 4th wave come fall/winter.

earthquakefish

Michael Moriarity wrote:

Here's something I think we're going to see a lot more of soon. 92 per cent of new cases in Sask. last month contracted by unvaccinated individuals: health ministry. In the near future, all reports on new infections will include how many of them were vaccinated.

Francois Biber of CTV wrote:

During the month of May, a whopping majority of new cases and hospitalizations in Saskatchewan were among those who had not received a first dose of the vaccine or had received a first dose within three weeks.

According to the province 92 per cent of 5,296 new cases in May were among individuals who had not been vaccinated. In the same timeframe 81 per cent of hospitalizations in Saskatchewan were people who were unvaccinated.

Unvaccinated individuals also made up 87 per cent of intensive-care patients, according to the Ministry of Health.

 

I'm curious how that should be read? Something seems missing here, I know there is a lot of talk about how a person should serve the community (quite fine), but shouldn't the community serve the individual too? That much is of philosophical debate, and needs to be seen that way simply - what I see happening, cases are going down (good), may it be attributed to vaccination (most likely, I trust it mostly - just feeling) but Canada, itself is approach what is needed for herd immunity (on first dose, far from entire efficacy - while I understand the choice, and it was wise), isn't the focus on unvaccinated somewhat suspect?  Can society dictate what a person should accept?  I really sit on a fence there.  And each time, when we reach a new milestone in presentation, a new variant appears?  It is becoming old - I'm not doubting the science, I am doubting media some and our collective hyper vigilance 

I've always doubted those who say they can help me, when they don't listen.

earthquakefish

earthquakefish wrote:

Michael Moriarity wrote:

 

And yes, I'm putting back in the argument civil liberties lawyers make, who gets to decide?  If you don't see, the government trampling on rights, without conversation, now a year in when a lot could be talked about - it becomes a little, as a society we could have talked about this instead of creating rules. Many in society are actually very mature, and topic and subject is sadly missed

Here's something I think we're going to see a lot more of soon. 92 per cent of new cases in Sask. last month contracted by unvaccinated individuals: health ministry. In the near future, all reports on new infections will include how many of them were vaccinated.

Francois Biber of CTV wrote:

During the month of May, a whopping majority of new cases and hospitalizations in Saskatchewan were among those who had not received a first dose of the vaccine or had received a first dose within three weeks.

According to the province 92 per cent of 5,296 new cases in May were among individuals who had not been vaccinated. In the same timeframe 81 per cent of hospitalizations in Saskatchewan were people who were unvaccinated.

Unvaccinated individuals also made up 87 per cent of intensive-care patients, according to the Ministry of Health.

 

I'm curious how that should be read? Something seems missing here, I know there is a lot of talk about how a person should serve the community (quite fine), but shouldn't the community serve the individual too? That much is of philosophical debate, and needs to be seen that way simply - what I see happening, cases are going down (good), may it be attributed to vaccination (most likely, I trust it mostly - just feeling) but Canada, itself is approach what is needed for herd immunity (on first dose, far from entire efficacy - while I understand the choice, and it was wise), isn't the focus on unvaccinated somewhat suspect?  Can society dictate what a person should accept?  I really sit on a fence there.  And each time, when we reach a new milestone in presentation, a new variant appears?  It is becoming old - I'm not doubting the science, I am doubting media some and our collective hyper vigilance 

I've always doubted those who say they can help me, when they don't listen.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

@earthquakefish, I wasn't suggesting anything about whether people should be forced to accept the vaccine. I agree that is a difficult question with lots of complications. My comment was mainly on the way people perceive events differently, depending on how they are expressed.

If people simply hear that there are N active covid-19 cases in their area, this won't have any effect on how they view vaccination. On the other hand, if they are told that the vast majority of those cases are unvaccinated people, with a smaller number of single dose cases, and a very small number of fully vaccinated cases, some of them may be persuaded that accepting vaccination is a good idea.

It does seem to be a trend now, with Alberta and Nova Scotia providing the information. For example:

Aidan Cox wrote:
Last Friday Nova Scotia began sharing its data on breakthrough cases, so far revealing that 94.6 per cent of its COVID-19 cases were in unvaccinated people, 4.8 per cent in partially vaccinated people and 0.6 per cent in fully vaccinated people.

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