CBC Radio Nerdz V

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kropotkin1951

As a state radio outlet it is mediocre and as a public broadcaster (its claim) it is abysmal.

George Victor

Nonsense.

Farmpunk

Summer programming is over.

Apprently regional highlights will be replayed as a show in the spot The Point used to occupy.  I think it's a good idea.

Other changes to national or regional in your area?

Farmpunk

Summer programming is over.

Apprently regional highlights will be replayed as a show in the spot The Point used to occupy.  I think it's a good idea.

Other changes to national or regional in your area?

Scott Piatkowski Scott Piatkowski's picture

Radio Two is running [url=http://www.cbc.ca/radio2/songquest/]The Great Canadian Songquest[/url] to determine which Canadian places need their own song (if they don't already have one). It's part geographical trivia and part musical celebration, something that only the CBC could pull off.

George Victor

Naomi Klein is interviewed on Q this a.m. on her TIFF position.

George Victor

And Naomi was not given the time to properly address the charges of anti-Semitism from the slimebag Israeli filmaker in the minute and a half left to her, as she observed . 

 

Scott Piatkowski Scott Piatkowski's picture

Great news!

 

2010 AGE OF PERSUASION SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED. We're thrilled to say we'll be starting our new season in January. Our Monday time remains the same at 11:30am, but our Saturday slot has changed to 10am. We'll be on Sirius Satelli...te four times a week in 2010: Saturdays 9am, Mondays 4:30pm, Thursdays 1pm, Fridays 3pm. (All times ET)

Farmpunk

I've been neglecting this thread.

Back to T-P.  You must have been listening to Tapestry.  Franti was featured on the show around that time.  Pretty cool episode, and an very under-rated show.  I like Hines' style.

I have just started listeing more to Radio 2.  And... I know earlier variants of this thread smacked the change in format, but it's very listenable.  I'm tuning it in more and more to escape from the incredibly scripted music formats of big private stations - and there are very few indies left.  Tefry and Drive is pretty good for a wide variety of tunes. 

The biggest change in radio 1 seems to be the new, nationally gathered, early afternoon show.  Can't even remember it's name, but it just gathers interviews and pieces and whatnot from regional shows.  A great idea, really, given the budget conditions. 

The political panel was back on As It Happens, then it wasn't there last Friday, unless it was early on.  I used to love the old political panel, despite Peter Denolo (sp err likely) annoying the hell out of me.

The Current has ran some nice pieces, too.  Tremonti did a solid set of interviews about the pork situation.     

Tommy_Paine

 

I was listening to Gomeshi for a bit the last couple of days.  Dang, he was interviewing a woman whose name I can't remember right now, on Wednesday morning.  She was really interesting.

But for some reason I can't really identify, Gomeshi has been getting under my skin in a bad way.  Probably more me than anything he's been doing.

George Victor

After doing a number on Naomi Klein, Sept. 11, by leaving her without time to refute a nasty,  Gomeshi is not to be trusted. Perhaps it's also what he's not doing?

Tommy_Paine

 

I'll try to listen more closely, next week.  Then again, if I have a predisposition to take issue, then I'll tend to remember the hits and forget the misses.

Maybe it's how he's both smug and self effacing at the same time that sets my jaw a certain way.

 

By the by (he said in his best Jim Bachus voice)

Did you happen to hear a woman talking about bugs and nature in general this morning.  In and out of the car, doing a bunch of things this morning, I came in at the tail end.

I think she was talking about Sexton Beatles, which if so, would  be kind of cool, because the youngest and I were watching a pair on a dead mouse last saturday.  I'd  never seen them before, and had to look them up in one of my insect field guides so I could tell her what they were, and what they were doing.

If it was about Sexton Beatles, I'm going to have to re-watch "Repo Man" with particular attention to the lattice of coincidence.......

 

George Victor

Didn't catch the bugs and nature bit, TP.  But you have stirred my interest in beatles - and Darwin's observations on the importance of cats as mouse catchers.  And I envy your proximity to youth - where you can do the nature thing together.  There's not so much opportunity as a grandad. Doing guided reading in a Grade 2 classroom is also missed.  The perfect age for curiosity. 

Farmpunk

I kinda like Gomeshi.  But I'm not a big Q listener.  It seems like regurgitated pop culture stuff, with an emphasis on big names.  The Billy-Bob thing was neat, but if that's the highlight of your show....

I didn't hear it but Gomeshi interviewed Douglas Coupland and I understand it was more like a stroke session.  I'm not the biggest Coupland fan, to say the least.  He could have showed as much a backbone by actually interviewing Coupland.  He didn't really write a novel about Generation A, did he?

Missed the bug talk, T-P. 

Now I have a bitch with the Current.  Surely the CBC can find someone better than Jan Wong to be the regular co-host.  Helen Mann, anyone?

toddsschneider

These days, Radio 2 is just all-hit radio with an alt-itude. Don't their pop-music hosts have more scope for tracks, than the same ones they recycle from each other's shows? I hold out hope, but it's getting threadbare.

toddsschneider

Jan Wong was used and abused by the powers-that-be for her "pure laine" column on the Dawson College shooting.

She's a brilliant journalist, if a middling radio host.  She deserves a decent engagement wherever she can find it.

Sharon

I like Jian Ghomeshi but as I've said before and I'll say again:  Q is not the kind of program I want to hear in the morning.  It is very much celebrity-driven (and as often as not, it's American celebrities) and I miss hearing about what people across our country are up to -- not the "newsmakers" but the regular people in their communities doing interesting things.  "This Country in the Morning"  was an unwieldy title and I'm not feeling nostalgic for that particular program but the sentiment expressed in the title appeals to me.

Unionist

Tommy_Paine wrote:

 

I was listening to Gomeshi for a bit the last couple of days.  Dang, he was interviewing a woman whose name I can't remember right now, on Wednesday morning.  She was really interesting.

Regina Spektor?

 

Tommy_Paine

Yes,  thank you Unionist.

and I miss hearing about what people across our country are up to -- not the "newsmakers" but the regular people in their communities doing interesting things.  "This Country in the Morning"  was an unwieldy title and I'm not feeling nostalgic for that particular program but the sentiment expressed in the title appeals to me.

 

Funny you should say, Sharon.  It's a bit of a sadurday morning tradition here, after I've caught up on dishes I've put off doing on friday, to get that done, clean something else, post here at babble and listen to CBC radio, and start yelling at the jerks being interviewed on "The House."

It riles me to no end how none of them are called on bullshit.  To top it off, these guests get access to media all the time to get thier point of view across. 

Is this really what a publically owned broadcaster should be doing?  Sure, we need to listen to experts on this issue or that, and I think the CBC does a good job there.  But it's inevitable that the "experts"  have thier own agendum, and quite often there's no one there to represent the public, or gainsay what they say for gain.

("gainsay what they say for gain" copyright 2009 Tommy Paine inc.)

Aside from emails and Cross Canada Check up, there seems to me little public involved in our public broadcast, but lots of podium time for the establishment.

 

Farmpunk

A couple things that I think have helped that syndrome, T-P, is a couple new shows.  One pm on 93.5 features a solid hour of regional stuff that will play well nationally.  It's good.

And right now I'm listening to a show that I can't seem to dig up on the net.  It's called "In the field", hosted by David Gutnick.  Radio documentary stuff for those inclined.

jas

Interesting programme on Sunday Edition this morning on guaranteed income and how spending to reduce poverty lowers costs overall. Pacific listeners would still have time to catch it.

 

kathleen

jas wrote:

Interesting programme on Sunday Edition this morning on guaranteed income and how spending to reduce poverty lowers costs overall. Pacific listeners would still have time to catch it.

 

I heard that. Never heard of it before. Wish I had. Also wish the NDP would pick it up - the poverty issue plus the possible solutions - but I don't suppose it's an election winner. I believe the Green party's policies include a guaranteed annual income connected to the collection of carbon tax and resulting reduction of income tax but I doubt they're aware of the experiment in Manitoba.

Farmpunk

I heard most of that chat with Hugh Segal and some of the interviews with the Manitoba experiment people after.  Segal sounded quietly frustrated by the inability of government to deal with poverty and the working poor, despite the glaring facts.  He was a red tory on a roll. 

His point that the gov spends more money administering the bureaucracy of its anti-poverty programs - some of which work against the goal of reducing poverty - is strong but I don't see how that system can be changed.  My experience is more centered around agricultural programs, and I see the same trends: big money being poured into ill-considered programs that are administered by legions of gov workers (or farmed out to contract companies, paid for by the public) with little benefit to anyone not employed directly by the program's bureaucracy.  These are job creation and income supplementation programs for people who manage to get hired by the gov - generally white collar people with fancy educational backgrounds and employment records with gov.

Which blended in well with one of Segal's final points - that poor people tend not to vote.  He didn't have the stats to back that up, mind you.  But his point is valid: the pols put public money into the programs which help people who in turn vote them into office.  The public service of these various and very expensive programs is fairly suspect. 

Segal on people "gaming" the system was good, too. 

Later in the day, while tractoring soybeans to the mill, I caught parts of Spark.  Where to start with this poor excuse for a show.  I love Nora and can listen to her for hours... but this show needs to be cut and the funds reallocated somewhere, somehow.  Grammar Girl is cute but do we really need lessons on how to write better email subject lines?  Spark is supposed to be about technology and how we deal with it.  But it's basically a show about the internet and the dorks who buy into the power of things like crowd-sourcing. 

Get out of the office and unplug, Nora!

George Victor

You have changed my mental image of the Ontario farmer "goin' down the road" , Fp.

Tommy_Paine

His point that the gov spends more money administering the bureaucracy of its anti-poverty programs - some of which work against the goal of reducing poverty - is strong but I don't see how that system can be changed.  My experience is more centered around agricultural programs, and I see the same trends: big money being poured into ill-considered programs that are administered by legions of gov workers (or farmed out to contract companies, paid for by the public) with little benefit to anyone not employed directly by the program's bureaucracy.  These are job creation and income supplementation programs for people who manage to get hired by the gov - generally white collar people with fancy educational backgrounds and employment records with gov.

 

And don't forget that these contract companies or consultants undoubtedly turn some of thier income from these projects into political contributions to the party in power who gave them the contract.  One could call it "Family Compact" politics, or one could call it money  laundering by a criminal organization.  Or  fraud.

Or, the status quo.

I'm remembering back to Massey's biography of Peter the Great, and how distressed and embattled Czar Peter was when it came to taxation and government spending.  Peter  figured he had to tax way above and beyond what was actually needed, in  order to account for the traditional corruption.

Anyway, the thing is Segal breaks bread regularly, no doubt, with the very people who are screwing the system. 

I'm sure Dante has described the appropriate section of Hell for people like him.

jas

Well, the experiment in Dauphin apparently worked. The money went to the people eligible for the program (people whose income fell below a certain line). I can't remember all the trends that were observed in the years the program was running, but the education rates stuck out: that high school students tended to stay in school and complete it, and college/university enrolments increased during these years. I guess this is documented somewhere.

Yes, his comments about poor people not voting because they're, for the most part, too preoccupied with survival.

The HSC researcher made some point about women that I didn't full catch. Something about one would expect higher divorce rates with women freer from the worry of poverty, but in fact that didn't happen, the opposite happened? If anyone here remembers that point...

 

kathleen

I believe she said the women with young children chose to stay home rather than work.

There's some more info here: http://ottawa.indymedia.ca/en/2009/10/10790.shtml

I thought that individual men and women received the payments but according to the above, not so in the Canadian experiment so families tended to stay together in Dauphin. There was an increase of separation and divorce in similar experiments in the USA, in which individual men and women received the income.

I'm looking forward to learning more about this when Evelyn Forget finished her work.

al-Qa'bong

George Victor wrote:

You have changed my mental image of the Ontario farmer "goin' down the road" , Fp.

Wasn't Goin' Down the Road a story of Newfies who moved to Toronto? 

In an effort to help you break your stereotyped image of farmers, I should tell you that I used to listen to Morningside on the tractor in the mornings, then switch to listening to stuff like Big Youth, The Angelic Upstarts and King Sunny Adé in the afternoons. I'd usually go back to CBC after 4:00.

Farmpunk

This is the CBC Radio Nerdz thread but feel free to post comments here about the "New" CBC News.  I haven't caught a minute of the tv but I have been listening to the radio a fair bit. 

I'm not all that happy with the music change. 

Peter Armstrong is now the morning caster.  He led with a story about the NHL selling the Coyotes this morning.  And he sounds bombastic, like he's used to talking to a tv screen.  Hmmm.

Mike Crawley seems fucked up somehow.  I used to listen for him but he's had some uneven reporting of late.  He sounds confused - at best ill or somehow uncomfortable - and I have to think the CBC changes have been larger than what we're hearing on the radio and it's affected the provincial affairs reporter.    

I've noticed that there are more reporters talking and fewer "stories", something that is apparently being replicated on the tv screen. 

I'm hearing tv people on the radio, and seeing radio people on tv - apparently Jian Gomeshi was on the National last night. 

Ontario Morning's show host, Wei Chen, sounded sad all morning.  

The Current and As It Happens are, to my ear, unchanged.  Without a search, I'm not entirely sure what's playing on weekday afternoons.  I heard Spark today. 

"Grammar Girl... should we be capitalizing...." 

And I turned it off. 

 

George Victor

My ideas of freedom of speech are apparently not as hidebound as yours, al. My "goin down the road" was not presented in upper case for exactly that reason...yes, it appeared bout 50 years ago.  And I have not only gone down the road behind many a farm tractor but actually had conversation with enough of their number - in the distanct past as a farmpage editor - to know that it was a safe observation. Of course, that ws before the age of political correctness, the great stultifyer.

And, finally, the observation was directed to farmpunk, as the initials indicate, hoping that he might come back with a guess as to the number of farmers who have, like him, quite eclectic tastes.

How about you, al? Are your tastes in radio perhaps representative of the farm community in your area?  It would be good to know. Or would you fear making an observation without serious social study for fear of going "stereotypical"?

al-Qa'bong

Since you've talked to so many farmers you probably found that their tastes are no less eclectic than those in any other occupation.

Scott Piatkowski Scott Piatkowski's picture

I find the new format for The National to be pretty superficial. I don't watch the news with a stopwatch in hand, but I swear that each story is shorter than it used to be. Did anyone else think so?

George Victor

quote: "Since you've talked to so many farmers you probably found that their tastes are no less eclectic than those in any other occupation."

 

Perhaps they have become so, in recent years. It was once not the case.

Farmpunk

I dunno about eclectic, but I occasionally get electric when I stand in a puddle and try to hot-wire a stubborn tractor to life with a screwdriver crossing the starter nodes...

I'm not going to comment on the new CBC tv news.  I haven't watched a minute of it.  I get most of my news from CBC radio, local radio, and online.  I haven't had a tv in my place for eight years.  But I think I may need to get a moron box to see what's happening.  I know for a fact that CBC tv does not exist in my area and that CTV is going under fast and Global never was around....

While ranting off topic a little...  I predict a return to community tv, small stations, with low operating costs.  It may not necessarily be "news" but there will be shows and stories.

Back to Ceeb radio.

I understand that World report is now significantly shorter.  A person who listens to more quality radio programming than I do referred to Peter Armstrong and the report as "yelling" tidbits of news at the listener.

I haven't listened to much afternoon programming.  I understand that Enright and Shelagh Rogers have new shows...  Anyone listening?

I dunno.  It's all a little depressing.  To me, the Ceeb should be - and sound - quite different from private radio.  That is the corp's mandate, right?  Ditto for tv.  But the trend is not going that way.  I really hope that some of the regional radio current affairs shows are able to keep going.   

thorin_bane

Yep scott and more infotainment than news.

Windsor will be on Vinyl Cafe Nov 16th we had a good crowd, hope you can hear us when it comes on!

George Victor

"Friends" Ian Morrison put out this appeal re community TV  :

 

You may have seen the full-page ads and TV commercials from the cable monopolies and from the broadcasters about who pays for television. "What's going on?" is a question I often get from supporters of Friends of Canadian Broadcasting. "I don't know whom to believe."

Have your Say:

Tell the CRTC that Local Television is important to you.

I want to offer you a few facts, and invite you to make yourself heard when the CRTC considers the future of local television. Next Monday, November 2nd is the deadline to express your opinions to the CRTC on this matter.

First, the facts:

  • Cable TV distributors pay nothing to conventional broadcasters like CTV, Global and CBC for the national and local programs they provide. Yet, the cable companies earn substantial revenues distributing these programs.
  • Public opinion research confirms that Canadians care about local news on television more than any other kind of programming.
  • Changes in the advertising market have taken all the profit out of local television. In smaller cities TV stations are closing down, and more closures are likely.
  • The most recent CRTC data show that Canada's private conventional over-the-air television networks made a profit before interest and taxes of only 0.4% in the broadcasting year ending August 31, 2008.
  • And that was before the onset of the recession. CanWest is now in bankruptcy protection, CTV has lost more than $100 million in the past year and CBC, as you know, is short $171 million.
  • Local news is expensive for the broadcasters because it requires staff, cameras, and facilities in each city, rather than a national feed from a single location.
  • Meanwhile, CRTC data reveal that the big cable monopolies, Rogers, Shaw, Videotron and Cogeco had a combined profit before interest and taxes of 32% in 2008: that's almost $2 billion - much larger, for example, than the CBC's budget.
  • All that money is travelling from the pockets of cable subscribers right out of the Canadian broadcasting system into the hands of cable shareholders.
  • So we have a crisis in local television at a time when the cable monopolists are laughing all the way to the bank.
  • CTV, Global, CBC as well as other local TV broadcasters have told the CRTC that they can no longer afford to provide their local signals to the cable monopolies without compensation.
  • Cable refuses to pay, and says that if the CRTC forces them to do so, they will pass on their payments along with a mark-up to their customers.
  • The CRTC has the power under the Broadcasting Act to force the cable monopolies to pay the local broadcasters for their signals and to regulate cable's basic rates so that they are not able to pass on these costs to the customers.

The question is: "Does the CRTC have the gumption to do this?"

This is where you come in...

I invite you to write to the CRTC and tell them in your own words why local television matters to you and and why you rely on the CRTC to protect your interests against the cable monopolies. In this special case, we believe that personal messages will be much more effective than any form letter.

This decision by the CRTC will shape the future of local television in Canada. It will only take you a few minutes to participate.

Yours sincerely,

Ian Morrison

Ian Morrison
Spokesperson
FRIENDS of Canadian Broadcasting

P.S. Even if you don't subscribe to cable, you may still have an interest in the survival of local TV in your community. Please take action now.

Farmpunk

I don't think it's in the best interests of the CBC to ally themselves with CTV\Global in this debate.  The Ceeb gets funding and is traditionally at odds with the privates because of it... and now it's buddying up with them?  To squeeze money from the cable-sats, which means the people paying the bills?  Double dipping, anyone?

As I've said before - Rogers actually creates local tv programming of a kind that none of the others do.  Perhaps it's a cynical ploy to deflect criticism, but around here, in smaller communities, it's the shrinking local newspaper and Rogers and some variable quality radio programming, most of which cannot be labelled as "news".  

This is not to put Rogers and the cable-sats on a pedestal, in any way.   

Scott Piatkowski Scott Piatkowski's picture

Farmpunk wrote:
As much as I dislike the idea of getting my CBC drive home show broadcast to me from Toronto...  I gotta say Here And Now is some good listening.  Robert Fisher is a good newscaster.  And Here and Now isn't just about the GTA. 

CBC Radio needs to realize that it has an audience outside of the 416 area code and reflect that in its program and newscasts.

A typical example: Yesterday, Jill Dempsey read a story that started out, "There could be a change to how we elect members of Toronto City Council..." The story was about proposed changes to Ontario's Municipal Elections Act (regarding expenses, campaign surpluses and voting day). Of course, those will affect every municipality in the province, not just Toronto.

Tommy_Paine

 

I've  been busy this week, and trying to listen to both CBC radio and CBC T.V. news.   I haven't been able to watch CBC T.V. news much.  Saw Mansbridge trying to do personable chit chat for a fleeting moment.  I hate that.  Watched a good bit of Power and Politics thisaft', not impressed at all.  But Solomon is trying to find his feet, I'm inclined to cut him slack.  He needs to slow down just a bit.   The H1N1 coverage was confusing, as it seemed to be trying  to cover it as a news story, which is out of place on his show.  I think they were trying to give background for discussion later.  I don't think it worked well.   The "Power Panel" seemed odd, also.   I think if one is going to have an openly partizan participant on the panel, then one should include partizans from all five political parties.

But, it's very early going yet.  Let the show find it's feet, then I'll criticize what an establishment toad Solomon has become.

(hey, I'm fair-- you know it's inevitable.)

Radio.  Hmmm.  I think all my likes and dislikes from before are intact.

But, as I said, I have been distracted this week.

 

 

Scott Piatkowski Scott Piatkowski's picture

On AIH tonight Carol and Barbara joked that they had done the entire show standing, in honour of their TV colleagues Laughing

thorin_bane

Excuse me but did they change newsworld to CBC News Network....um is that copywrite infringement of CNN....and do they think renaming the channel will do anything for it? Just noticed and not a big fan of the new name. I guess we know that the creative portion of job requirements isn't required anymore.

Farmpunk

Haha, Budd and Off actually said that?  Sweet.

I haven't seen any of the new National, but I did catch parts of Solomon the other day while at the gym.  I don't mind him and I'll give the show a chance... if and when I start watching. 

There are some vicious comments floating around the net about the new CBC tv.  There's this particular picture of Mansbridge talking with someone, a wide far away camera angled shot, and they're standing on a platform of some sort surrounded by a weirdly designed set.  It looks moronic, like a modern design PHDer with a budget ran amok with the primary pastels while seeking to slap a brave new world spin on the Ceeb....

Back to AIH.  In early September the show announced the return of the Friday political panel.  The panel was in place for one week and has never returned.  I may write the show and see what happened.  I used to really enjoy the old political panel before it was disbanded.  

The reason why I bring this up is because Peter Donolo used to be on that panel, and I always remember him as a very intelligent slippery eel, a perfect Liberal apologist.  He used to drive me insane.  And now he's Iggy's puppeteer.  So I wouldn't be surprised to see Iggy start performing less like a mistake. 

Tommy_Paine

 

Y'know, I'm a little fed up with CBC tv and Radio's reliance on panels that are made up of representatives from this political party or that, or one professional lobby or another.    These guys have pretty good access on thier own account to buy air time for their views, and they get news coverage where they get to spew their party line spin or biz agenda's. 

To be fair, I think CBC does do a better job than anyone else giving a voice to issues and people who couldn't buy or find a podium anywhere else in the MSM.   But really.  I think if Robin Sears or Peter Donolo want  to get their advertising across, they can bloody well buy it on the private networks, and stop having us subsidize their lies on the CBC.

 

 

George Victor

A great CBC morning with Michael Enright, who announced that next Sunday will include Gerry Adams of Sinn Fein fame. 

Farmpunk

I still have yet to catch all of the CBC radio changes.  I haven't had a chance to listen to any of the afternoon programming. 

Newscasts in my area haven't changed much.  Peter Armstrong in the morning is growing on me.  He's getting better, smoother.  I don't have a lot of editorial comments on his story selection, etc.  I do dislike tossing the cast to a reporter chit-chat right away.  And some of these QandAs have been shakey.

Having said that...  CBC London's Gary Ennet was on the 6 pm cast, about the Bandidos trial results last week.  So maybe some more local stories and reporters will get on air.  It's nice to hear from places and voices around the country on the national casts and programs. 

A big change to Radio 2 is the new Strombo show.  He used to be on private radio with a three or four hour show.  But he's moved to Sunday nights at eight on R2.  I listened last night and it was, as advertised, a wide range of music.  The kind of show I like, because I'm just that into music to dig up new tunes, but I like listening.

I shudder to think what they're paying him and his crew.  I suspect there are many other people and CBCers who could have done the job just as well.  Admittedly, I'm not a big Strombo fan and never watch The Hour.  But he has a following... I think.

T_P, Donolo was a Liberal apologist and defended the Cretien era with a vengence.  It's not his fault the other people on the panel weren't able to break him down.  I have noticed fewer pundits and so forth on the air.  The Ceeb current affairs shows used to regularly interview pollsters on political matters...  I always disliked that, worse than having party loyalists and PR people on air. 

    

George Victor

Annabel Lyon, author of The Golden Mean (bet she wins the Giller...and more) , a "rewind" of Paul Robson singing to 40,000 miners and their families and friends, and Michael Enright's  live interview with Gerry Adams made for a marvelous Sunday a.m.

Farmpunk

I keep missing the Sunday Edition.  And I haven't found time to listen to the podcasts, either. 

Has anyone listened to Strombo's new Radio2 show on Sunday nights?  I tried it last weekend, the debut, and it was okay.  I'm not a big Strombo fan so maybe I'm being excessively fair. 

Farmpunk

I keep missing the Sunday Edition.  And I haven't found time to listen to the podcasts, either. 

Has anyone listened to Strombo's new Radio2 show on Sunday nights?  I tried it last weekend, the debut, and it was okay.  I'm not a big Strombo fan so maybe I'm being excessively fair. 

George Victor

Gomeshi's Wednesday show will feature Al Gore and David Suzuki in conversation. (might have to catch the evening repeat).

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