Kathline Wynn's Secret Policy Advisor: Andrea Horwath

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Brachina
Kathline Wynn's Secret Policy Advisor: Andrea Horwath

http://m.thestar.com/#!/news/andrea-horwath-is-kathleen-wynnes-secret-po...

 

 Cohn makes a good point that alot of Wynn's policy is coming from the NDP, alot including most of the most popular policies. 

 So while the NDP has faced some set backs this year, in NS and BC, there are still some really good prospects in Ontario and Federally, to the point where the NDP is influencing the policy agenda of both Premier Wynn and PM Harper.

janfromthebruce

it appears Wynne is good at plagerism of the NDP policies.

Brachina

I guess we all have our talents.

janfromthebruce

yes, and pretty surprised by Cohn writing that piece because normally he's pretty much rah rah Liberal. Interesting twitter comments about this article and how it's being read.

Cohn: with a record of results from the rudderless Wynne gov't, Horwath transforms into a potential Premier.

And

Wynne needs her own ideas. 10 months into her Premiership there's really no excuse for the empty ideas cupboard.

Geoff

Brachina wrote:

http://m.thestar.com/#!/news/andrea-horwath-is-kathleen-wynnes-secret-po...

 

 Cohn makes a good point that alot of Wynn's policy is coming from the NDP, alot including most of the most popular policies. 

 So while the NDP has faced some set backs this year, in NS and BC, there are still some really good prospects in Ontario and Federally, to the point where the NDP is influencing the policy agenda of both Premier Wynn and PM Harper.

I hope it improves the party's prospects, but should New Democrats not worry that the Liberals, true to form, will eat our lunch and leave us with fewer seats after the next election?  We need to come up with some good ideas that the Liberals won't want to touch.

For example, Wynne is now talking about an Ontario pension plan.  Why don't we take it several steps further and argue for a portable pension plan that will give part-time workers an opportunity to build some kind of pewnsion for themselves?

janfromthebruce

I think the difference going forward is that Horwath is the most popular leader in Ontario by far and that the anti union attacks against educators and trades (supporting EllisDon) has disconnected the linkages with them supporting Liberals going into the next election.

Geoff

Since we don't have an American-style electoral system where they elect their chief executive separately, I'd be careful about linking Andrea's personal popularity to the potential fortunes of the party.  We've had the most popular leader many times before, and it didn't mean a thing on election day - that's old news. While it's nice to have the most popular leader, to be successful, we need some new ideas that separate the NDP from the rest.  Still looking...and hoping. 

 

Stockholm

Geoff wrote:

Since we don't have an American-style electoral system where they elect their chief executive separately, I'd be careful about linking Andrea's personal popularity to the potential fortunes of the party.  We've had the most popular leader many times before, and it didn't mean a thing on election day - that's old news. While it's nice to have the most popular leader, to be successful, we need some new ideas that separate the NDP from the rest.  Still looking...and hoping. 

 

Actually the last time the Ontario NDP had the most popular leader was in the lead period leading up to the 1990 Ontario election. That campaign began with the Liberals way ahead but with Liberal voters overwhelmingly having the NDP as their second choice and with people increasingly disgruntled with Peterson...it didn't take much for soft Liberals to think they could have the best of both worlds and go back to the fresh era of the Peterson-Rae accord in 1985 and get a new cast of characters in power under a leader (Rae) who people liked much better than Peterson.

janfromthebruce

Geoff having a popular leader can work to a party's advantage as one well knows. I'm quite aware that our system of provincial government is not like the American presidential system, and I am sure you know that I know that.

I'm sure those involved at the local riding association level will be putting forth ideas for the upcoming election campaign that distinguish the NDP from the Liberals.

And I also know that there is a more positive correlation between popular leader and party outcomes than the reverse. I also know that in areas where one or two issues become dominant rather than leader centric can determine the outcome of who gets locally elected. So some wedge issues do matter. Those wedge issues, for example, can act as motivators for donations, resources, and campaign workers and ultimately voter turnout.

A popular leader can be an asset in the campaign but I did not suggest that it was the whole thing.

Skinny Dipper

Geoff wrote:

While it's nice to have the most popular leader, to be successful, we need some new ideas that separate the NDP from the rest.  Still looking...and hoping. 

I am in agreement with you.  The problem I have in trying to support the Ontario NDP actively is that I don't know what the general theme of Andrea Horwath's message is.  I do know she supports lower auto insurance premiums and that she supports some accountability office (whatever that means).  My worry is that when Kathleen Wynne calls an election next spring (I'm betting on it), Ms. Wynne and the Liberals will have an overall theme.  So, too, will the Conservatives.  The Ontario NDP?  I don't know.  I can always suggest to my downtown Toronto friends who do not drive that they will get lower auto insurance rates if they support the NDP.

Skinny Dipper

It is 95% likely that I won't be voting in the next provincial election.  None of the major parties is actively campaigning for proportional representation.  The leader of the Ontario Green Party supports the Rabit non-proportional voting system for the city of Toronto municipal elections.  That has just disqualified my support for the Ontario Green Party.  Tim Hudak and the Cons?  Yeah, get real!  Kathleen Wynne and her Liberals took away my collective bargaining rights as a teacher.  Andrea Horwath went silent immediately after Bill 115 was passed.  Also her support for the Liberal budgets mean that she has enabled the Liberals and Conservatives to attack teachers and construction workers' labour rights.  My trust in her is not there.

Brachina

Andrea's doing the best she can with the cards she's been dealt cut her some slack.

janfromthebruce

Skinny Dipper wrote:

It is 95% likely that I won't be voting in the next provincial election.  None of the major parties is actively campaigning for proportional representation.  The leader of the Ontario Green Party supports the Rabit non-proportional voting system for the city of Toronto municipal elections.  That has just disqualified my support for the Ontario Green Party.  Tim Hudak and the Cons?  Yeah, get real!  Kathleen Wynne and her Liberals took away my collective bargaining rights as a teacher.  Andrea Horwath went silent immediately after Bill 115 was passed.  Also her support for the Liberal budgets mean that she has enabled the Liberals and Conservatives to attack teachers and construction workers' labour rights.  My trust in her is not there.

Horwath, NDP to keep fighting Bill 74

"It takes away the company's obligation to honour its collective agreements, but you deal with that at the bargaining table, you don't deal with it by trying to ram legislation through the Legislature in Toronto."

"We've seen the chaos that kind of legislation creates with Bill 115," Horwath said.

Bill 115, passed in 2012, cleared the way for the government to head off strikes and imposed wage freezes on teachers.

NorthReport

I gather Andrea did not advise the Premier on her signage!

Ontario premier corrects spelling mistake on sign with pen

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-buzz/ontario-premier-corrects-spell...

Geoff

The way our electoral system works a "non-vote" usually gives the advantage to the incumbent party.  So in the Ontario context, staying at home most likely becomes a vote for the Liberals, even if it is unintentional.  Bummer, but that's our voting system for you. 

mark_alfred

Skinny Dipper wrote:
Andrea Horwath went silent immediately after Bill 115 was passed. 

Really?  link1 link2 link3 link4 link5

janfromthebruce

In other news today, OPC leader Hudak wonders aloud - Hudak questions why NDP willing to 'prop up' Liberals

Hudak penned an open letter to NDP Leader Andrea Horwath on Sunday, saying he is "astounded" that the third-party has allowed the minority government to survive by helping it pass budgets over the past two years.

The Progressive Conservatives have voted against each of the minority Liberals' budgets, while the New Democrats have won concessions from the government in consecutive years during the budget process.

Alternatively, Hudak should pen a letter to himself and his caucas and ask why Horwath led ONDP is up 3 seats since the last election and the Hudak PCPO is up ZERO.

David Young

Jan, didn't the P.C.'s pick up the Etobicoke seat in the by-election?

 

Stockholm

David Young wrote:

Jan, didn't the P.C.'s pick up the Etobicoke seat in the by-election?

 

Yes, but they lost Kitchener-Waterloo to the NDP so they net out at ZERO

janfromthebruce

Stock figured out the tricky math/ratio answer. Kiss