ONT NDP Leader Andrea Horwath will become Premier of Ontario

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onlinediscountanvils

Junkyard Dog wrote:

if McGimpy is fool enough to call another election.

 

Junkyard, please don't use disablist language like this. Thanks.

NDPP

besides all parties are quite happy with the barbaric budgetary savagery which they have subjected the poorest Ontarians to and have no wish, especially the NDP to have to fight for anything on their behalf. If the NDP doesn't want to go to the voters, it is because they know they have nothing to offer and besides why run if you don't have to? It's easier money sitting on your ass playing politrix or cashing your big fat cheque on summer recess. Disgusting politicians. And even more disgusting citizenry that allows it to continue.

Stockholm

If what you say is true then i guess the next Ontario election shoudl be a great opportiunity for the Communist Party to sweep to victory in ontario..what are you waiting for?

North Star

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/fate-of-ontarios-budget-hin...

So it looks as if Horwath is going to allow ServiceOntario to be privatized. Only with more "oversight" than the Liberals were proposing. Sigh...

This will only further alienate Horwath from labour. Both OPSEU & CUPE are dead set against Section 28. Horwath's indifference to public sector workers is disgusting. 

janfromthebruce

Well no matter what NDPP says, I don't want a summer election and I don't have the beliefs about the NDP MPs which you suggest. I also saw a poll via the Star who suggests the libs would pay at the polls - big time and take the lion's share of the blame.

 

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Ontario Budget: McGuinty blamed for snap election, but Horwath’s popularity hurt, poll finds

North Star

Though I'm critical of Horwath, it's quite clear back in the original budget standoff in May, she said the NDP would try to amend thing in committee. I think this is a good piece on the issue: http://ontariondp.com/en/fact-check-ndp-problems-with-bill-55-are-old-news The real problem is Horwath while managing to stop potential future privatizations from occuring w/o a vote she is still allowing ServiceOntario to be sold to the highest bidder.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Question: can the Ontario PCs accept donations from the cash-rich federal Conservatives? Or are there laws against this? I'm sure Harper wants Hudak in, and I think Rob Ford does as well. Not to mention virtually every large corporation inside and outside Ontario probably wants Hudak in as well.

North Star

Boom Boom wrote:

Question: can the Ontario PCs accept donations from the cash-rich federal Conservatives? Or are there laws against this? I'm sure Harper wants Hudak in, and I think Rob Ford does as well. Not to mention virtually every large corporation inside and outside Ontario probably wants Hudak in as well.

I'm not convince Bay Street loves Hudak, especially since he's seen as an idiot. They would probably rather have some one else like Klees or Elliott running the PCs before they would push them more heavily. Since Dalton is going ahead with austerity and privatizations, I think Bay Street is happy to stick with the devil they now. If anything Green Energy companies and manufacturers may get nervous about a Hudak government. Of course the left should play off divisions within the bourgeoisie! :)

North Star

Oh it gets better...

Quote:

 

Andrea Horwath puts a pragmatic face on provincial New Democrats

2012/06/17 12:00:00 

By Carol Goar Editorial Board, Toronto Star

 

By the time Derry Millar finished thanking her, New Democratic Party Leader Andrea Horwath seemed at least an inch taller.

It wasn’t quite an endorsement, but it was exactly the message she wanted the business audience to hear from the kind of person whose approval she needed.

Millar, former head of the Law Society of Upper Canada, partner at Weir Foulds specializing in corporate litigation, and member of the Ontario Judicial Council, had stature in the legal and business communities.

But it was his words that counted. Born in Saskatchewan, Millar had grown up under NDP premiers Tommy Douglas and Woodrow Lloyd and watched their successors, Allan Blakeney, Roy Romanow and Lorne Calvert, govern the province. Each was socially progressive but fiscally conservative, he said. And Horwath seemed to be cut from the same cloth.

That reinforced the theme of her breakfast speech to 130 of the city’s top lawyers, corporate executives, bureaucrats and political consultants. She repeatedly aligned herself with Manitoba Premier Gary Selinger and Nova Scotia Premier Darrell Dexter — and distanced herself from her Ontario predecessors, Howard Hampton and Bob Rae.

“My challenge is to turn the page of the NDP in Ontario,” she said. “I’ve tried to move away from a dogmatic clinging to ideology, to show I bring a different approach and set of standards.”

As an example, she cited her party’s budget stance. Rather than defeat Dalton McGuinty’s minority government, which the NDP has power to do, Horwath is committed to supporting it — with conditions. She proposed six amendments to his budget in April:

• A 2-per-cent income surtax on individuals making more than $500,000.

• A 1-per-cent increase in welfare and disability support payment rates.

• $20 million in additional funding for northern and rural hospitals.

• A $418,000 cap on the salaries of public employees.

• A $250-million tax credit for companies that create new jobs, invest in training or replace aging equipment.

• Transitional assistance for the horse-racing industry, which is slated to lose its government support.

Premier Dalton McGuinty grudgingly accepted these demands, allowing the 300-page budget implementation bill to go to an all-party legislative committee for clause-by-clause review. 

During this process, the NDP put forward — and surprisingly the Conservatives supported — proposals to remove five sections of the bill that would have loosened environmental regulations and privatized many government services.

A second round of brinksmanship is now underway. A final vote is scheduled for next Wednesday.

Horwath told the blue-chip audience she is willing to work with the government to reduce Ontario’s $15 billion deficit — but it will require compromise on both sides. “We’re prepared to be a reasonable partner,” she said. “We want to demonstrate we can govern responsibly.”

Her speech drew heavily on the NDP’s 2011 platform, but also reflected the new-found assurance of a leader who has held the balance of power in the legislature for eight months.

It also benefitted from her post-election experience speaking to business groups. Since last fall, Horwath has addressed chambers of commerce and boards of trade across the province. She knows they disagree with some of her policies (the high-income surtax especially) but she believes she can convince them she is a constructive politician.

Judging from the reaction of the 130 guests at the Weir Foulds breakfast, she is making inroads. She handled the questions from the floor knowledgeably and pragmatically. The comments afterward were generally favourable. 

Horwath will have to play her hand shrewdly in the legislature and keep reaching out to skeptical audiences to erase her party’s old image of fiscal profligacy. But she has a good sales pitch and she delivers it well. 

Carol Goar's column appears Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

 

Jesus. Comparing yourself to Darrel Dexter? It manages to get worse every passing day. 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Andrea was totally awesome on P&P tonight - totally shut down McQuinty's (and his finance minister's)  whining. Smile

janfromthebruce

oh, I so have to watch that clip BB - thanks for the heads up - I rarely watch tv - can't figure out how to operate with 3 remotes!

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

She  says  she doesn't draw lines in the sand, and she thinks it's childish for McQuinty to have a knee-jerk reaction and threaten an election when he doesn't get his way.

janfromthebruce

I saw the interview at CBC. Solomon was actually pleasant with her. Andrea stuck to her guns and clearly stated that they previously stated when passing the budget motion that they supported it going to the finance committee for an indepth review and there have been over 200 amendments made, including many done by Liberals.

Also, the truth of what the NDP agreed to was reported in the MSM and can be googled. McGuinty and Duncan are looking like overthetop two-bit politicians and not leaders at all.

toaster

I'd much rather have an election and save Ontario Northland and Service Ontario (among others), and I think many NDP supporters are with me on that.  I think Andrea might be giving in a little too much.

janfromthebruce

Toaster nobody in my neighbourhood is talking "election" - odd isn't that Joe and Jane public are probably totally unaware of all this. I wonder because of total lack of interest that perhaps they may not be happy with an election in the summer.

North Star

toaster wrote:

I'd much rather have an election and save Ontario Northland and Service Ontario (among others), and I think many NDP supporters are with me on that.  I think Andrea might be giving in a little too much.

And this will only get worse as I'm sure public sector workers are about to find out.

mark_alfred

Given their current third party status, the NDP are definitely punching above their weight and landing some good hits.  Not only did they get some concessions from the government on fair taxation and social assistance, they stick-handled the Conservatives in committee to tone down some aspects of the bill.  Great stuff.  Kudos to Andrea, our next premier.

Caissa

I would be greatly shocked if she ever became premier. I wonder what sort of book people are willing to offer on that question.

NDPP

Her most notable characteristics are that she's perfectly capable of throwing the poor under the bus of a brutal austerity budget and she's afraid to go to the people - presumably for fear of losing. NDP = no difference party.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Just saw this - but can't download HuffPost on my slow dialup:

 

NDP Abstains As Ontario Budget Passes www.huffingtonpost.ca A summer election in Ontario was averted Wednesday with the passage of the minority Liberal government's budget.

Caissa

Abstaining is an excellent way to show leadership.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Frown

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

NDPP wrote:

Her most notable characteristics are that she's perfectly capable of throwing the poor under the bus of a brutal austerity budget and she's afraid to go to the people - presumably for fear of losing. NDP = no difference party.

Hard not to agree, seeing as how Andrea abstained on this critically important vote. Frown

Stockholm

I think abstaining was the perfect message to send. The NDP promised not to defeat the budget and cause an election in exchange for a string of concessions. The NDP did NOT promise to jump up and down yelling "hip-hip hooray" while voting in favour of a budget that is still larded with a lot of things they object to.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

They could have voted AGAINST the budget, Stock. Horwath looks like she's saying she doesn't want to be premier.

autoworker autoworker's picture

The NDP has shown that it's not a major player in Ontario.

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

She just stabbed Mulcair in the back! Losers. I hate these Provincial Premiers. They all act like Liberals. Better be carefull or we get the same thing again. I am fed up. They can all go to hell!

onlinediscountanvils

Arthur Cramer wrote:

She just stabbed Mulcair in the back! Losers. I hate these Provincial Premiers. They all act like Liberals.

 

McGuinty acts like a Liberal because he is one. I'm not sure what Horwath's excuse is.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Okay, I'm not up to speed on this. How did Horwath stab Mulcair in the back? By making the NDP irrelevant in Ontario? (that's the only guess I have for now).

Fidel

Caissa wrote:

Abstaining is an excellent way to show leadership.

 

I agree. ;- The NDP is saying they don't want taxpayers to foot the bills for another election at $150,000,000 dollars a pop and just 9 months after the last one. It's summer and voter turnout would likely sink to a new low in old conservative and now nouveau Liberal Ontario. Ontario voters are a lot like British voters - they search high and low for reasons to vote Tory. They would most likely do it again for old time sake given the currently chaotic economic and political situation. I don't want another Mike the Knife Harris clone dictating things from Toronto, and I don't think other progressive people would, either. And the likelihood of it happening is pretty good given the nature of our dysfunctional electoral system. Listen not to seductive electoral sirens - they are prolly not so trustworthy.

Doug

Arthur Cramer wrote:

She just stabbed Mulcair in the back! Losers. I hate these Provincial Premiers. They all act like Liberals. Better be carefull or we get the same thing again. I am fed up. They can all go to hell!

 

How so? Probably the best thing for the federal NDP in Ontario is for the provincial party not to be in government and dealing with the pile of crap that is Ontario's financial situation (also the historical reality that Ontario tends to support different parties at each level) or for the provincial party to be blamed for putting Tim Hudak in power.

Stockholm

The best thing for the Ontario NDP and for the federal NDP is for McGuinty to turn away from Horwath and start making deals with Hudak instead. That would drive a wedge between the Liberals and the more progressive part of their base and create schism between the Liberals and the teachers and nurses unions and also a schism with environmental groups.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Those schisms don't exist already? Jesus, how long has McQuinty been Premier???   Surprised

autoworker autoworker's picture

As a brand, the Liberals are now fighting for survival in their home market. With the ONDP neutered, they can now direct their attack on Hudak, who is also a weak leader, who's party would gladly throw him under the bus. By failing to indicate a lack of confidence in McGuinty's government, Horwath has highlighted her own lack of confidence in her party's prospects.

janfromthebruce

I respectfully disagree with autoworker re "neutered" - considering everything it is the Libs who took the lion's share of their faux - call a election if I don't get my way. And your reference to weak leader, as "another" you must mean McGuinty because his numbers are in the dumpster with Hudak and only Andrea is super high ratings.

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

janfromthebruce wrote:

...and only Andrea is super high ratings.

 

That being the case, why is she afraid of an election?

janfromthebruce

I don't think BB it was "because she was afraid of an election" and I think that is the wrong question. How about that Ontarians were not eager for an election in anyway. I think that if one triggers an election one needs to do so having some idea of the outcome and if it will be more positive. Personally I don't think it would have been.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I doubt see'll ever be premier now. She had her chance and blew it.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

After doing a Caspar Milquetoast by abstaining on something so crucial as a budget vote, I can't imagine the electorate ever trusting her with the reins of power. A black eye for the ONDP in my opinion.

theleftyinvestor

Well at least she extracted some concessions for not voting against. When the federal Liberals kept abstaining on Conservative budgets, they did it because they were afraid to face the polls again, not because the Conservatives had done anything to deserve their support.

The OLP assailing the ONDP was a pressure tactic. It resulted in Horwath on the defensive, reducing her demands to prove that she was not going to force an election. And seeing as she has dropped a bit in the polls, it seems the OLP succeeded at least in the short term in "putting the ONDP in their place" - the knowledge that neither party would have any likely influence if they went to an election today is reason enough to hang on for dear life.

Stockholm

I haven't seen any drop in the polls by the NDP. They have been at 30% in every poll for the past three months and nothing has changed and that is way above what they got in the election./

wage zombie

I think if the choice was between an eletion now and an election a year from now over the next budget, the NDP will be in better position a year from now to fight an election.

The problem with waiting for the next opportunity is that it might give the PCs a chance to dump Hudak.

A one seat minority so soon after the last election will get a bit more leeway with the public.  I think it's undeniable that the NDP was the party that made gains from the whole budget process.  I don't know why people think this was a one time shot (squandered) to use those gains.

Next budget the NDP will be able to either extract more concessions than this one or force an election.  I think the NDP could have fought an election just fine, if needed.  I don't think the budget was passed because the NDP were afraid of an election--I think the budget was passed because the NDP is in a position to become govt-in-waiting.

The people who are saying now that Horwath and the NDP have lost their chance are the same people who said that the NDP would take a hit for dealing with McGuinty in the first place.  And you were WRONG.  The opposite happened.  Horwath gained approval by extracting those concessions, weak as they were.

That said, rather than a mass abstention I would have preferred to see Horwath vote for it with the rest of the NDP MPs voting against.  Although I suspect that might just not be how these kind of things are done.

Doug

Boom Boom wrote:

That being the case, why is she afraid of an election?

 

Paying for a campaign would be more than a little difficult just now. It would be dumb to cause an election and then not be able to run much of a campaign.

robbie_dee

wage zombie wrote:

I think if the choice was between an eletion now and an election a year from now over the next budget, the NDP will be in better position a year from now to fight an election.

The problem with waiting for the next opportunity is that it might give the PCs a chance to dump Hudak.

A one seat minority so soon after the last election will get a bit more leeway with the public.  I think it's undeniable that the NDP was the party that made gains from the whole budget process.  I don't know why people think this was a one time shot (squandered) to use those gains.

McGuinty may have a majority by the end of this year if the Kitchener-Waterloo byelection goes his way.

autoworker autoworker's picture

No doubt there'll be plenty to gnaw on this BBQ season.

autoworker autoworker's picture

double post

Stockholm

I don't know what makes anyone think the Liberals can win the KW by election. Governments traditionally LOSE gound in by elections even when they are riding high across the province and right now Liberal support is at 26% across Ontario - that is down a ful TWELVE points from what they got in the last election. On top of that McGuinty is personally very unpopular. Both the PCs and the NDP will have a powerful argument to make that people should not give McGuinty a blank cheque by giving a majority by the back door. 

janfromthebruce

I agree with Stock here and in fact I believe McGuinty's & Duncan's hissy fit about the budget and going to a snap election was all about that bi election. Firstly, the Libs in committee made about 200 amendments to the omnibus budget bill and not a peep about that but right near the end, they unload unto the NDP and try to paint Horwathe as the problem - remember it is Horwath's leadership numbers that are exceptional in comparison to both Hudak and McGuinty.

McGuinty appeared to try to paint this, as I need a majority or else this sort of unstable govt will con't. And his main competition is Horwath.

In bi elections, the focus becomes about the leader and to some extent about the chosen candidate. So a well known candidate with lots of good qualities and political gravis could really shine in a bi election. And it's true that in bi elections the govt often pays the price.

I'm thinking that the libs election game didn't work out well in how it was played.

mark_alfred

Wow, tough crowd here.  My perspective is that she achieved some pretty significant things.  She got an agreement for fairer taxation -- specifically, a new surtax on the very wealthy (over $500,000).  Bear in mind that even the membership of the federal NDP chose a leader (Mulcair) who felt this was too risky a proposition to discuss now, rather than either Topp or Cullen who did promote this.  So it's a very significant thing, and she proved this can be a feasible and even popular move.  Further, she altered the stance of the government on freezing social assistance, gaining an increase in rates (and even a small increase in anything, particularly for the poor, from an austerity minded gov't like the Libs is significant).  Also some stuff was achieved in committee, as reported by Now Magazine.  Now Magazine is often critical of the NDP, so the fact that they aren't in this case is telling.

Doug wrote:

Boom Boom wrote:

That being the case, why is she afraid of an election?

Paying for a campaign would be more than a little difficult just now. It would be dumb to cause an election and then not be able to run much of a campaign.

Like Ignatieff did.  Instead, like Layton, she negotiated some significant concessions from the government.  She certainly did not merely sit on her hands, as some here have been portraying her as doing. 

The idea of causing an unpopular election just nine-months after you've had one (where you made significant gains from the previous session) would be an incredibly stupid gamble, especially when you've successfully been able to influence policy, and especially when you're working on rebuilding your finances and building a bigger funding base.  The Libs made 4X as much as the NDP, and the PCs made 5X as much as the NDP, during the period from Sept 7, 2011 TO Jan 06, 2012.  Specifically, the NDP made 955,342.51, the Libs 3,983,414.00, and the Cons 5,007,110.66. link 1

Caissa

Now that we have a had 100 posts can the successor thread have a less prophetic title?

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