winter closing in

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Unionist

lagatta4 wrote:

At least Canadian Thanksgiving relates to harvest season, at least in more southerly areas. US Thanksgiving, of New England origin, is ridiculously late there. Thanksgiving is a very minor holiday in Québec, probably as it was seen as a Protestant observance. 

Um - no. Thanksgiving was a U.S. invention, and Canada adopted it - in November. Same as Canada adopted Labour Day in September from the U.S. (which the U.S. invented to undermine May Day, the internationally recognized workers' holiday).

Then, in 1918, Canada decided to make November 11, Armistice Day, a holiday. That never happened in the U.S. So Canada had to move Thanksgiving to October. That only was formalized by Parliament in 1957.

There's nothing religious about Thanksgiving, Protestant or otherwise. It's a U.S. holiday which celebrates settler triumph over Indigenous people. It certainly has nothing to do with the harvest, as its November date demonstrates.

Misfit Misfit's picture

Like guests who came over to dinner and outstayed their welcome.

Unionist

Misfit wrote:

Like guests who came over to dinner and outstayed their welcome.

LOL! Thanks for condensing my explanation into a perfect analogy.

lagatta4

That is true. But it is an extremely minor celebration in Québec and if people here have festive suppers (not necessarily turkey) it is because it is a day off and they are cooking autumn bounty. Not celebrating anything but eating and drinking with friends and sometimes family. The big family parties are at the end of the year.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The Weather Network predicts long, cold, messy winter

It's going to be a long, cold and messy winter across much of Canada, according to the seasonal forecast released Monday by the Weather Network.

November has already brought historically early snowfall in southern Ontario and power outages in the Prairies, setting what chief meteorologist Chris Scott said will be a trend throughout the winter.

"The upcoming winter across the country looks to be more frozen than thawed, and we've already seen an early entrance of winter weather this fall," he said. "The signs that we're seeing this year do suggest we're in for a winter that's more on than off across the country — and that it's going to be fairly long for many Canadians."

But things are looking a little better in British Columbia, where Scott said temperatures will be slightly above normal and precipitation will be just below normal.

However, he said there may still be a two-week period where winter shows up out of the blue on the Pacific coast. Conditions will also likely be favourable in British Columbia's ski areas, despite the slightly higher temperatures.

In Alberta, Scott said, there will be above-normal precipitation in the south, with especially frigid temperatures throughout the province.

The trend of a deep freeze will continue through Saskatchewan and Manitoba. That's especially the case in the southern parts of the Prairies, where Scott said he expects cold air to anchor down for the season.

From southern Ontario to southern Quebec, Scott said, people can prepare for a winter that's colder than usual and has much more precipitation than normal.....

An early winter storm with heavy wet snow caused fallen trees, many on cars, and power lines in Winnipeg early Friday morning, October 11, 2019. File photo by The Canadian Press/John Woods

 

Pondering

Last summer wasn't supposed to be nice but it was great. I have found that winter has been pushed along. A cool spring including June seems more normal now.  

Aristotleded24

Pondering wrote:
Last summer wasn't supposed to be nice but it was great. I have found that winter has been pushed along. A cool spring including June seems more normal now.

I've noticed that in general, the seasonal forecasts at The Weather Network seem to mirror whatever conditions are currently happening at the time the forecast is released. For example, if the weather in Manitoba is cold and dry at the time they publish their winter forecast, then the winter forecast will generally be warm and dry. Sometimes the predictions pan out, sometimes they don't.

Misfit Misfit's picture

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Pondering wrote:
Last summer wasn't supposed to be nice but it was great. I have found that winter has been pushed along. A cool spring including June seems more normal now.

I've noticed that in general, the seasonal forecasts at The Weather Network seem to mirror whatever conditions are currently happening at the time the forecast is released. For example, if the weather in Manitoba is cold and dry at the time they publish their winter forecast, then the winter forecast will generally be warm and dry. Sometimes the predictions pan out, sometimes they don't.

And like how in southern Ontario, they forecast rain Mon thru Fri and sunshine on the weekends.

And in Saskatchewan, they forecast bright sunshine throughout the summer until they find out that there is a massive drought, and then they change their forecasts to rain showers in four to five days.

Pondering

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Pondering wrote:
Last summer wasn't supposed to be nice but it was great. I have found that winter has been pushed along. A cool spring including June seems more normal now.

I've noticed that in general, the seasonal forecasts at The Weather Network seem to mirror whatever conditions are currently happening at the time the forecast is released. For example, if the weather in Manitoba is cold and dry at the time they publish their winter forecast, then the winter forecast will generally be warm and dry. Sometimes the predictions pan out, sometimes they don't.

I had not noticed that. I will pay closer attention. It does seem like longterm forecasts are a bit like horoscopes. You can kind of fit yourself into whichever sign you happen to be born under. 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Misfit wrote:

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Pondering wrote:
Last summer wasn't supposed to be nice but it was great. I have found that winter has been pushed along. A cool spring including June seems more normal now.

I've noticed that in general, the seasonal forecasts at The Weather Network seem to mirror whatever conditions are currently happening at the time the forecast is released. For example, if the weather in Manitoba is cold and dry at the time they publish their winter forecast, then the winter forecast will generally be warm and dry. Sometimes the predictions pan out, sometimes they don't.

And like how in southern Ontario, they forecast rain Mon thru Fri and sunshine on the weekends.

And in Saskatchewan, they forecast bright sunshine throughout the summer until they find out that there is a massive drought, and then they change their forecasts to rain showers in four to five days.

This Rick Mercer piece is awesome.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkDvqQKGgDA

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