Anatomy of a Heat Wave

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bongo
Anatomy of a Heat Wave

"This year, Toronto Public Health, without any notice or consultation that I am aware of, will cease declaring heat alerts and its shelter division will no longer operate cooling centres despite their own dire prediction: "It is projected that by 2040-2050, the City can expect to experience approximately 66 days with maximum temperatures above 30°C as compared with 18 such days in the summer of 2018.""

Wow.

For those of us who like living above ground... look out.

Air conditioning can be as expensive as paying for winter heating in this country. Are we prepared to pay 200, 300$ per month year round?

Where was Toronto's contribution to the 'Extinction Rebellion' protest? Have we fallen asleep?

Sean in Ottawa

bongo wrote:

"This year, Toronto Public Health, without any notice or consultation that I am aware of, will cease declaring heat alerts and its shelter division will no longer operate cooling centres despite their own dire prediction: "It is projected that by 2040-2050, the City can expect to experience approximately 66 days with maximum temperatures above 30°C as compared with 18 such days in the summer of 2018.""

Wow.

For those of us who like living above ground... look out.

Air conditioning can be as expensive as paying for winter heating in this country. Are we prepared to pay 200, 300$ per month year round?

Where was Toronto's contribution to the 'Extinction Rebellion' protest? Have we fallen asleep?

Why blame them? Ford just gutterd their ability to deliver on their mandate. They were not doing anything unnecessary.

I think this would be better in the news section, the environment section or the Ontario section -- I do not think it will get enough attention here.

bongo

I read it on Rabble, and talked about it here. Just like the forum title said. I wish it would get a little more attention yes. Most of the content was a direct quote from the article on Rabble of the same title.

Thanks for commenting.

kropotkin1951

bongo wrote:

I read it on Rabble, and talked about it here. Just like the forum title said. I wish it would get a little more attention yes. Most of the content was a direct quote from the article on Rabble of the same title.

 Thanks for reposting part of this rabble article in the forum called: Rabble News Features Read it on rabble, then talk about it here.

I had missed the article on rabble and it might be worth a read but I can't find it, could you please post a link. Big cities like TO need to make sure there are enough outdoor places like micro-parks with shade areas and things like mist tents.

bongo
kropotkin1951

Thanks Bongo.

It is disheartening to see that yet again we know the answers but are going in the wrong direction.

Lessons were learned. First, that accelerated death rates were linked to poverty, unaffordable housing, diminished social programs, and access to air conditioning. Second, that the most critical public health measures that can save life in a heat emergency are early warning systems, the immediate opening of neighbourhood-based cooling centres, outreach to seniors and vulnerable populations including vans to pick people up to take them to cooling centres, fan and air conditioner installation programs, and reverse 911 calls, or automated calls to people who are vulnerable.

bongo

When the decisions are made in favour of the few wealthy over the many, its easy to conclude that the decisionmakers don't serve the offices to which they were elected & and appointed to; by and paid for by the many. Don't they have to swear an oath? What is the oath? A promise to perform financial& moral analingus to the wealthy & disregard average citizens? If not, can't they be prosecuted for breaking their oath of office?

kropotkin1951

That is like expecting the federal government to actually make laws for the peace, order and good government of Canada.

bongo

Yes, its the original purpose, at least as advertised... I just think, if breaking their oath is persecutable... since its an oath of office, it would be nice to see them hang for breaking it. Theres got to be a more civilized way than the guillotine, surely?

Mr. Magoo

Quote:
Don't they have to swear an oath? What is the oath?

Basically an oath of allegiance to the Queen.

WWWTT

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
Don't they have to swear an oath? What is the oath?

Basically an oath of allegiance to the Queen.

That says it all right there doesn’t it? So much for democracy when your oath is only to one wealthy privileged person whom is the head of the largest imperialist power or actually past imperialist power humans have ever known. 

More evidence that western democracy is only an imperialist invention. 

Anyways, sorry about the thread drift. 

Sean in Ottawa may very well be right in stating that the Ford government with all their stupid ass cutbacks are probably responsible for these reductions of services. 

 

NDPP

Heat wave driven by climate change bakes the Pacific and Northwest of the US and Canada

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2021/06/29/clim-j29.html

"The consequences of human-induced climate change are creating a 'new normal'..."

Edzell Edzell's picture

Quote:
Don't they have to swear an oath? What is the oath?

Basically an oath of allegiance to the Queen.

Sworn with fingers crossed behind the back. Effective allegiance (deference, required obedience) is to the immediate superior in the hierarchy. Nobody gives a damn about the queen.

NDPP

Western Canada's heat wave is 'unprecedented'. Scientists say it will become more common with climate change

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bc-heat-wave-climate-cha...

"There's going to continue being new normals until we stop emitting greenhouse gases,' says climate scientist..."

Pondering

"There's going to continue being new normals until we stop emitting greenhouse gases,' says climate scientist..."

That's inaccurate. If we stop emitting greenhouse gases tomorrow climate change will continue to worsen for decades. What we are striving for now is to stop it before we hit the point of no return, which could be very close.

 

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I agree with Pondering. The snowball to hell has already started tumbling down a hill and getting bigger and bigger. Yes, it's an ironic choice of metaphor but f*ck these are more than ironic times.

kropotkin1951

My maple tree in the front yard has sun burnt leaves on it. June on Vancouver Island used to be wet and cloudy and affectionately called Junuary. We have had a week of temperatures 10 degrees higher than anything I have ever seen at this time of the year and now we are heading into a week at least of what used to be our hot temperatures.

In the meantime Canada's climate action plan includes building TMX. I wish I was delusional some days because the world would make more sense.

kropotkin1951

This story was published the afternoon before Lytton burnt to the ground. By 7:00 AM it was in ashes.

A forest fire of thousands of hectares is burning near Lillooet.

According to the BC Wildfire Service, the Mckay Creek Wildfire is located approximately 23 kilometers north of Lillooet, along West Pavilion Road.

The fire was discovered on Tuesday and is classified as out of control.

The BC Wildfire Service said the blaze is estimated at 3,700 hectares.

“Due to the hot, dry weather, this fire grew quickly after it started,” the forest fire department said in a statement.

“This is an emerging incident and further updates will be provided as they become available. “

On Tuesday evening, 45 people were on hand to fight the blaze, supported by tankers and four helicopters.

The BC Wildfire Service said it recommended an evacuation alert to the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District.

The smoke is visible from Lillooet and the surrounding area.

https://www.fr24news.com/a/2021/06/fire-north-of-lillooet-explodes-over-...

kropotkin1951

Lytton was named after one of BC's racists.

bekayne

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Lytton was named after one of BC's racists.

I don't think Lytton ever set foot in B.C.

Edzell Edzell's picture

I think the practice of 'honouring' people by naming places after them, and of erecting statues of them, is bizarre and elitist. Whatever deeds they performed, 'good' and 'bad', let their historical record speak for itself. Then you don't have to edit/destroy plaques & statues when the population wakes up to the fact those were all just ordinary humans after all.

kropotkin1951

bekayne wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Lytton was named after one of BC's racists.

I don't think Lytton ever set foot in B.C.

Yes I was rather imprecise in how he was a "BC" racist.

When news of the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush reached London, Bulwer-Lytton, as Secretary of State for the Colonies, requested that the War Office recommend a field officer, "a man of good judgement possessing a knowledge of mankind", to lead a Corps of 150 (later increased to 172) Royal Engineers, who had been selected for their "superior discipline and intelligence".[25] The War Office chose Richard Clement Moody, and Lord Lytton, who described Moody as his "distinguished friend",[26] accepted the nomination in view of Moody's military record, his success as Governor of the Falkland Islands, and the distinguished record of his father, Colonel Thomas Moody, Knight at the Colonial Office.[27] Moody was charged to establish British order and transform the newly established Colony of British Columbia (1858–66) into the British Empire's "bulwark in the farthest west"[28] and "found a second England on the shores of the Pacific."[25] Lytton desired to send to the colony "representatives of the best of British culture, not just a police force": he sought men who possessed "courtesy, high breeding and urbane knowledge of the world,"[29] and decided to send Moody, whom the Government considered to be the archetypal "English gentleman and British Officer."[30] at the head of the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, to whom he wrote an impassioned letter.[26]

The former HBC Fort Dallas at Camchin, the confluence of the Thompson and Fraser Rivers, was renamed in his honour by Governor Sir James Douglas in 1858 as Lytton, British Columbia.[31