Linda McQuaig

Journalist and best-selling author Linda McQuaig has developed a reputation for challenging the establishment.

As a reporter for The Globe and Mail, she won a National Newspaper Award in 1989 for a series of articles which sparked a public inquiry into the activities of Ontario political lobbyist Patti Starr, and eventually led to Starr's imprisonment.

As a Senior Writer for Maclean's magazine, McQuaig (along with business writer Ian Austen) probed the early business dealings of Conrad Black, uncovering how Black used political connections to avoid prosecution. An irate Black suggested on CBC radio that McQuaig should be horsewhipped.

In 1991, she was awarded an Atkinson Fellowship for Journalism in Public Policy to study the social welfare systems in Europe and North America.

McQuaig has been a rare voice in the mainstream media challenging the prevailing economic and political dogma — as a columnist in the financial pages of the National Post in the late 1990s, and since 2002, as an op-ed columnist in the Toronto Star.

She has also taken on the status quo in a series of controversial books — including seven national best-sellers — such as Shooting the Hippo (short-listed for the Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction), The Cult of Impotence and It's the Crude, Dude: War, Big Oil and the Fight for the Planet. Her most recent book is Holding the Bully's Coat: Canada and the U.S. Empire.

Columnists
Aug 24, 2010

Harper's Fox News luncheon

It's interesting to imagine why our Prime Minister would want to meet with Rupert Murdoch, whose Fox News TV channel has poisoned U.S. political debate.
Columnists
Jul 27, 2010

Making it easier to ignore the poor

We hear a great deal about the lives of the rich, much of it sympathetic and often fawning. The poor rarely get such sympathetic attention. And they're soon to get even less.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Linda McQuaig