Podcast
Victoria Fenner | Listen in to a press conference where a group of prominent Canadians launched a manifesto outlining a bold climate and economic vision.
Book Review
Errol Sharpe | Is capitalism run by greed? You bet! We need alternatives to capitalism that rely on compassion and courage if we are going to avoid economic and ecological disaster.
Podcast
Changing the Conversation on Taxes
Victoria Fenner | A different perspective on taxes from the lineup of speakers on "Tax is Not a Four Letter Word."
Blog
Gary Engler | Do you want an equitable, sustainable economy? Then help overthrow capitalism and create an economic democracy.
Blog
Jim Stanford | Here for ease of access is a consolidated listing of the contributions to the special series of commentaries marking the 50th anniversary of the publication of Mel Watkins' classic 1963 article.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Marjorie Griffin Cohen | Feminism was the unlikely route for my contact with the staples theory. I say 'unlikely' because staples development analysis has a structural amnesia to gendered issues.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Sheila Dow, Alistair Dow | Alistair and Sheila Dow, two leading heterodox economists from the U.K., apply the main features of staples analysis to the case of the financial sector and find surprising similarities.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Thomas Gunton | In this commentary on Mel Watkins' staple theory, Thomas Gunton applies staples analysis to the current boom in resource-oriented petroleum developments in Canada.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Daniel Drache | In this installment of the staple theory series, Daniel Drache considers whether the so-called "Northern model" of development can survive this latest incarnation of staples dominance.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Hugh Grant | Hugh Grant argues that the historical roots of the staples theory enunciated by Watkins go back a little further than just Harold Innis. Learn here about the initial contributions of W.A. Mackintosh.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Brendan Haley | There is an intersection between the "staples trap" and a new, more ominous "carbon trap," that must be addressed centrally in modern policy responses to the challenge of staples dependence.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Dan Ciuriak | Dan Ciuriak imagines how the discovery of some future new staple might spur Canadian policy-making to think more effectively about how to make the most of our resource wealth.