Blog
Chrystia Freeland in 2017. Image: Wikimedia Commons
Brent Patterson | Chrystia Freeland has supported billions being spent on the military. Could the $1.2 trillion debt change that?
Columnists
RCAF Chinook helicopter sits on the front lawn of Parliament in Ottawa. Image: Jamie McCaffrey/Flickr
Matthew Behrens | No matter who takes the reins of Parliament next week, perhaps the biggest winner in Canada's 2019 federal election will be a conglomerate of military industries and the war department.
News
General Jonathan Vance. Photo: NATO/Flickr
Bruce Moncur | Chief of the Defence Staff Jonathan Vance's record speaks for itself.
Blog
Canadian Forces light armoured vehicle on display. Photo: Mike Babcock/Flickr
Yves Engler | In a system where money talks, militarists on Parliament Hill will always be among the loudest voices. To rise above their din, we need to figure out ways to amplify the Canadians who prefer peace.
Columnists
rime Minister Justin Trudeau, Minister Chrystia Freeland and Minister James Gordon Carr take part in a panel discussion. Photo: Adam Scotti/PMO
Matthew Behrens | To distract from the glaring failure to prioritize child care over warfare and housing over drones and new bombers, the Liberals continue to dance about the global stage as self-proclaimed feminists.
Blog
Canada 150 RCAF CF-18 Fighter Jet. Photo: Wilson Hui/Flickr
Yves Engler | The problem with glorifying soldiers is that veterans' organizations can use their cultural standing to uphold militarism and reactionary politics.
Blog
Chief of the Defence Staff Jonathan Vance. Photo: Gatis Dieziņš/Latvijas armija/Flickr
Yves Engler | The military goes to great lengths to shape coverage of its affairs and one should expect stories about Canada's mission in Mali to be influenced by the armed forces.
Blog
Canadian soldiers point guns. Photo: Cpl Alana Morin/4 Cdn Div / 4 Div CA - JTFC/FOIC/Flickr
Yves Engler | The alleged perpetrator of Monday’s van attack in Toronto has ties to a powerful patriarchal institution that is Canada’s biggest purveyor of violence.
Columnists
Photo: Cpl. Janessa Pon​
Rick Salutin | Conventional soldiers "keeping the peace" could be as fatuous as the obscene "war to end all wars" was. But apparently most Canadians like the idea of peacekeeping -- who wouldn't?
Blog
Image: Wikimedia Commons/United States Navy
Yves Engler | The military's internal ideological capacity has a wide reach. The newspaper at the naval base rejected an ad from a law firm seeking to represent CF members who had been sexually harassed/assaulted.
Columnists
Matthew Behrens | Trudeau's cheery offer at the UN to bring peace to the world fell flat in light of his government's "principled" commitment to sell billions in weapons and blanket militarism.
Blog
Roger Annis | Nuclear-capable NATO forces are in Ukraine and now crowd right up to Russia's western border in the Baltic region. Canada's participation in the folly is seamless from Harper to Trudeau.