Columnists
Ralph Surette | Now that Albertans are getting on pogey as the oil economy has collapsed, you'd think we'd at least be spared the lectures about how economically virtuous Albertans are compared to Maritimers.
Activist Toolkit
| Vote Child Care 2015 brings together child care advocates and supporters from across Canada to promote the vision endorsed at the ChildCare2020 conference.
News
rabble staff | The Good Jobs Summit brings together labour activists, economists, politicians and workers. It’s open for everyone – follow it here on rabble.ca
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Daniel Poon | Can China be more than a market for Canadian staple resources -- and more than a source of upward pressure behind the global prices of those staples?
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Sheila Dow, Alistair Dow | Alistair and Sheila Dow, two leading heterodox economists from the U.K., apply the main features of staples analysis to the case of the financial sector and find surprising similarities.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Thomas Gunton | In this commentary on Mel Watkins' staple theory, Thomas Gunton applies staples analysis to the current boom in resource-oriented petroleum developments in Canada.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Brendan Haley | There is an intersection between the "staples trap" and a new, more ominous "carbon trap," that must be addressed centrally in modern policy responses to the challenge of staples dependence.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Dan Ciuriak | Dan Ciuriak imagines how the discovery of some future new staple might spur Canadian policy-making to think more effectively about how to make the most of our resource wealth.
Blog
Photo: Mel Watkins
Gordon Laxer | The next installment in our special series celebrating Mel Watkins' work focuses our attention on the latest staple boom to remake Canada's economy: the bitumen sands of northern Alberta.
Blog
Daniel Wilson | Daniel Wilson reviews two new papers from the MacDonald-Laurier Institute concerning Indigenous interests in the resource economy.
Columnists
Jim Stanford | Bitumen boosters like to pretend there is a "consensus" among hard researchers that the Dutch disease hypothesis is false.
Columnists
Jim Stanford | One of the most irrational aspects of the recent energy boom has been its perverse impact on export revenues. In essence, the faster we extract bitumen and export it, the cheaper it gets.