Columnists
Cargill beef-processing plant in Schuyler, Nebraska. Image: Ammodramus/Wikimedia Commons
Lois Ross | With a minority government in place, there may be an opportunity to push for expanding the climate change debate to include the impact that industrial agriculture is having on our environment.
Columnists
Rush hour traffic in Toronto. Photo: Michael Gil/Wikimedia Commons
Ole Hendrickson | Like cigarettes, cars should have health warnings and governments should place tight legal restrictions on auto industry ads and sponsorships.
Blog
Twitter photo by @ec_minister.
Brent Patterson | Emission trading systems and weak carbon pricing coupled with a new tar sands pipeline do not add up to a credible action plan to stop climate breakdown.
Blog
Tony Clarke on zero carbon emissions. Dennis Gruending photo.
Dennis Gruending | Respected activist Tony Clarke has a new book mapping out how Canada can get to net carbon emissions of zero by 2040.
Blog
J.D. Irving smoke stacks in Saint John, New Brunswick. Photo: Tony Webster/Wikimedia Commons
David Suzuki | Knowingly putting humanity -- and countless other species -- at risk for the sake of profit is an intergenerational crime against humanity, but it's unlikely any perpetrators will face justice.
News
Torndao damage in west end Ottawa. Photo credit: John Wilson/Facebook
Karl Nerenberg | While climate change related events ravage citizens' lives, Ontario Premier Ford and his enablers gleefully attack virtually all measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Blog
David Suzuki | With carbon pricing, Canada can compete in the emerging clean economy, encouraging job creation, renewable energy development, conservation and efficiency while shifting away from fossil fuels.
Blog
Image: Selena/Flickr
David Suzuki | Transportation accounts for about 14 per cent of global emissions and is now the largest source of CO2 emissions in the U.S., mostly from cars and trucks.
Blog
Traffic on 401 Highway in Toronto. Image: Danielle Scott/Wikimedia Commons
Andrea Harden-Donahue | Between 1990 and 2014 transportation pollution increased 42 per cent. Since transportation is the second largest source of climate pollution in Canada, reversing this trend is essential.
Blog
Photo: Dennis Jarvis/flickr
Brendan Haley | Nova Scotia policymakers should have known for some time that carbon pricing is coming. The province should be prepared to succeed in a low-carbon future because of earlier reduction efforts.
Columnists
Ole Hendrickson | One of the most important things individuals can do to combat climate change is to use alternatives to cars for frequent, shorter trips. Let's weigh the benefits and risks of active transportation.
News
Photo: flickr/Province of British Columbia
Alyse Kotyk | Trudeau said working with the provinces and territories will be the cornerstone of the climate change approach. But B.C. is ignoring recommendations that could limit carbon pollution. What now?