Columnists
Panel discussion, "The Equal Rights Amendment: Yesterday and Today," at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Photo: Jeff Reed/U.S. National Archives/Wikimedia Commons
Amy Goodman, Denis Moynihan | Over the last 240 years, the U.S. Constitution has been amended many times -- but never to extend the guarantee of equality to women.
Podcast
Marching from Parliament House down King William Street to Victoria Square, Adelaide, to commemorate the 30th Anniversary of the Aboriginal Flag.
Jiselle Hanna, Piergiorgio Moro | Labour updates from the Asia Pacific region and the struggle by Aboriginal people in Australia to get real power.
Blog
Image: Wikimedia Commons/	Marc Lostracci
Penney Kome | Section 15's curious history makes it a wild card in the Charter.
News
Image: PMO/Adam Scotti
Russell Diabo | The Liberals' backsliding on adopting UNDRIP and inexplicable approvals of the Site C Dam and Lelu Island LNG plant in B.C. are part of a long tradition of deceiving and betraying First Nations.
Blog
David Suzuki | In this long election, we must demand more from those who hope to govern us. We need to ensure that this election is decided on real issues that affect all Canadians and not on pointless distractions.
News
Photo: flickr/Stephen Harper
Karl Nerenberg | Stephen Harper told CBC's Peter Mansbridge that he thinks he 'wins' the election if he gets the most seats. That is pure humbug.
News
Photo: flickr/ Tony Webster
Karl Nerenberg | Section 47 of the Constitution of Canada says clearly that the House of Commons can pass a constitutional amendment with the Senate.
News
PHOTO: flickr/Raj Taneja
Karl Nerenberg | The BNA Act says senators must be 'resident in' the provinces they represent. Duffy and Wallin did not meet that requirement when Harper named them to the Upper House of Parliament.
Blog
Cover: La Bataille de Londres
Christopher Majka | Frédéric Bastien's La bataille de Londres claims the patriation of the Constitution was a coup d'état. Is this so? Must we endlessly replay the partisan battles that have disfigured Canadian politics?
Blog
Steven Shrybman | If CETA negotiations succeed, the result will fragment Canada's constitutional landscape by creating 'have' and 'have-not' provinces where the scarce resource will be the capacity to govern.
Columnists
Duncan Cameron | Should Tom Mulcair be surprised to learn that a chorus of Canadian editorial boards have condemned him for being soft on Quebec sovereignty, and therefore a danger to national unity?
Blog
David Suzuki | Most countries have now enshrined the right to a healthy environment in their constitutions. But not Canada. It's time to change that.