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 Manatee. Image credit: Chris Muenzer/Wikimedia Commons
Brent Patterson | Two Canadian companies have expressed their support for fracking in Colombia, despite significant threats to human rights defenders, the climate and aquatic wildlife.
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Image: Peace Brigades International
Brent Patterson | Colombian human rights defenders to talk fracking and climate change at public forums in Ottawa, Vancouver and Nanaimo this November.
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Image: Ficamazonia/Facebook
Brent Patterson | Indigenous communities in Colombia want to protect the Amazon rainforest from fracking.
Blog
Image: SFU/Flickr
David Suzuki | To profit as much as possible from fossil fuels before markets fall under the weight of climate chaos and better alternatives, industry and its allies say fracked gas is a climate solution. It's not.
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Photo Credit: Bruce Gordon, EcoFlight
David Suzuki | A review of more than 1,500 scientific studies concluded that fracking contaminates air and water with chemicals that can cause serious health problems, including cancer, asthma and birth defects.
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Twitter photo by CCALCP.
Brent Patterson | The Luis Carlos Perez Lawyers' Collective in Colombia is working with communities to stop fracking by corporations, including Calgary-based Canacol Energy Ltd.
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Rachel Small | At the same time as the Unist'ot'en people began a fight in BC courts against TransCanada's injunction, hundreds gathered in Toronto in solidarity to protest at TransCanada's office.
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Graphic: Council of Canadians
Emma Lui | The approval of LNG Canada, a $40-billion fracked gas project, gives the green light to a very thirsty industry that will abuse even more water at a time when water supplies are unpredictable.
Podcast
Image: Council of Canadians
Scott Neigh | Dorene Bernard and Rebecca Moore talk about grassroots Mi'kmaq resistance to the Alton Natural Gas Storage project.
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Image: Screenshot from "Water Warriors" trailer
Doreen Nicoll | Here are two movies that will shock, inspire and remind you why water is always an election issue.
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Photo: Kate Ausburn/Flickr
Ben Parfitt | Such an inquiry should not be limited to scientific questions, but should focus squarely on the risks associated with fracking and what should be done about them.
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Image: Flickr/Province of British Columbia
David Suzuki | Beyond existing commitments to reduce methane emissions by 45 per cent, governments must work to eliminate them from this sector by 2030, with strong regulations, monitoring and oversight.