Columnists
Canada's premiers tour Muskrat Falls dam construction site in 2015. Photo: Government of Newfoundland and Labrador/Flickr
Matthew Behrens | The crisis of Canada's toxic divide has come into sharp focus in Labrador, where the plans are to push the Muskrat Falls megadam to full operations by the fall.
Columnists
Muskrat Falls construction site. Photo: Government of Newfoundland and Labrador/Flickr
Matthew Behrens | In 2019, the entirely preventable methylmercury poisoning of the traditional country food web of Indigenous people downstream of the Muskrat Falls megadam in Labrador is set to begin.
Blog
Krystalline Kraus | $85 million centre for treatment of mercury poisoning promised after years of grassroots activism by Grassy Narrows citizens and allies.
Blog
Grassy Narrows Rally in Toronto, 2016. Image: Leadnow Canada/flickr
Krystalline Kraus | The Ontario government knew for twenty years how badly the land and water had been contaminated by mercury spills.
Activist Toolkit
Muskrat Falls, image by erik.altitude posted on flickr and labeled for reuse
| Demand their immediate release and a stop to this dangerous project
Blog
Krystalline Kraus | Victory for the Grassy Narrows First Nation and surrounding communities has finally come after a decades-long struggle.
News
Photo by Ossie Michelin
Cory Collins | Action over Muskrat Falls gained momentum following occupation of the project's work site. Premier Dwight Ball met with Aboriginal leaders on Tuesday, which ended with an agreement on the project.
Columnists
Ole Hendrickson | Protesters at Muskrat Falls are demanding that Nalcor Energy clear away vegetation and the surface soil layer from the area to be flooded in order to reduce poisoning by methyl mercury.
Blog
Photo: Howl Arts Collective/flickr
Mark Calzavara | Stunning revelations came to light last week that top environment officials in the Ontario government knew that clearcut logging in Grassy Narrows territory would increase mercury levels in fish.
News
Photo: flickr/Howl Arts Collective
Sophia Reuss | Grassy Narrows continues to demand government action after a recent Toronto Star investigation revealed a former mill worker's confession to having dumped at least 50 barrels of mercury.
RabbleTV
Avi Lewis | Activist and journalist Avi Lewis calls upon the Ontario government to clean up mercury contamination in Northwestern Ontario affecting Indigenous communities.
News
Photo: Steph Wechsler
Steph Wechsler | "Every day that goes by without justice for Grassy Narrows is another attack on the land," said Avi Lewis. A new report shows the mercury contamination can be cleaned up in the Wabigoon-English River.