News
Protests during the third Summit of the Americas on 21 April 2001 in Quebec City. Image credit: Personal snapshot by Montréalais/Wikimedia Commons
Maude Barlow | rabble.ca was on the front lines of the anti-corporate globalization movement in 2001, telling the story of the dangers of free trade deals and of the growing protests to confront them.
News
President Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto sign the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement during a ceremony in Buenos Aires, on the margins of the G-20 Leaders' Summit on November 30, 2018. Image: U.S. Department of State/Flickr
Gordon Laxer | The new agreement, USMCA, is subject to review every six years. When it dies, Canada and the U.S. will revert to an old agreement with an energy clause that would kneecap any future climate action.
Blog
Image: LeadnowCanada/Flickr
Sujata Dey | The old NAFTA gutted local economies by putting profit and free trade over people and the planet. Will the new agreement, which will likely be ratified in 2020, be any better?
Podcast
NAFTA 2.0
Marc Belanger, Derek Blackadder | RadioLabour's Canada Report July 12 to 19, 2019. The proposed replacement for NAFTA is not good enough. U.S. labour also opposes NAFTA 2.0. The LabourStart Report. And more.
Blog
Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau. Photo: Wikimedia Commons
David J. Climenhaga | Consider the dissimilar cases of Meng Wanzhou and Stephanie Clifford. The first we won't allow to leave, the second we won't allow to visit.
Blog
Brent Patterson | Despite the spin, commentators argue that culture and media wasn't protected by the Trudeau government in NAFTA 2.0.
Blog
Marie Aspiazu | Last week, Canada signed a rebranded NAFTA deal after months of suspense and secretive negotiations. But what does the deal mean for the internet? Here's the lowdown.
Blog
NAFTA Initialing Ceremony, October 1992. Photo: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum/Wikimedia Commons
Mel Watkins | With one trade agreement having failed us, some are arguing that we should diversify our trade beyond the U.S. market by signing on to more trade deals. But is that the wrong lesson?
Columnists
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister Chrystia Freeland speak with journalists following the conclusion of USMCA negotiations in Ottawa. Photo: Adam Scotti/PMO
Duncan Cameron | In ongoing talks with Japan and the EU, the U.S. plans to use the precedent created by a concession granted in the USMCA to advance the American goal of punishing China for its trade practices.
Blog
Sophia Reuss | It was a busy week. We wasted no time in distilling the good, the bad, and the ugly in NAFTA 2.0; analyzing the outcome of the Quebec elections; looking at the latest Trans Mountain Pipeline updates.
Blog
Brent Patterson | The transnational corporations that are driving climate chaos celebrate the new USMCA.
Blog
Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer speaks Josh Bolten from Business Roundtable about NAFTA. Photo: Andrew Scheer/Flickr
David J. Climenhaga | As Britain's looming Brexit catastrophe shows, so-called trade agreements are easier to get into than out of. So there was not much to be done but negotiate the least awful deal possible.