News
Mortar and pestle with pills. Photo: Pixabay
Ed Finn | Medicare originated at the provincial, not federal level -- in Saskatchewan. So could the extension of public health care to include prescription drugs, and even dental and vision coverage.
Podcast
Image: Wikimedia Commons/Tom Varco
Redeye Collective | A national pharmacare program would save the health-care system billions and improve the health of the one in 10 Canadians who can't afford the medication they are prescribed.
Blog
Michael Butler | Today the Council of Canadians released a landmark report on universal pharmacare.
Blog
Image: Twitter/Canada 2020
Michael Butler | One of the sponsors listed is the largest pharmaceutical lobby group in the U.S.
Blog
Justin Trudeau
David J. Climenhaga | Surely, according to the Tories' anti-electoral-reform arguments, the case is stronger for a national referendum on the TPP?
Blog
Image: Flickr/Konstantin Lazorkin
Michael Butler | Do you think your pension plans should invest in companies that jack up the price of drugs for seniors and the suffering?
Blog
Michael Butler | Big Pharma influences what doctors prescribe -- a practice that needs to change.
Blog
Michael Butler | Health Canada finally acknowledged what health economists, academics and activists had been saying for some time: drug costs will rise under pending trade deals like the TPP.
Blog
Image: Wikimedia Commons
Michael Butler | It came as a major disappointment this week that Canada's Health Minister, Jane Philpott, indicated pharmacare is not part of her mandate.
Blog
Image: Flickr/Broadbent Institute
David Molenhuis | The NDP claims the TPP will dramatically increase the price of life-saving medicines among other implications for Canada's public health-care system. Is this true?
Blog
Photo: sharyn morrow/flickr
Melissa Newitt | Canada is the only country with public health care and no national drug plan. This means that 24 per cent of Canadians have no coverage for medications prescribed by their doctor.
Columnists
Retiree Matters, Doug Macpherson | There's an opportunity in October for older Canadians to tell politicians what they want and expect from future governments. Seniors are voting and they're going to make it count.