Podcast
Suing the police: The ongoing legacy of the 2010 G20 summit in Toronto
Scott Neigh | Luke Stewart talks about his ongoing lawsuit to hold the police accountable for some of their infamously bad behaviour during the G20 summit in Toronto in 2010.
Blog
Image: Flickr/andrewarchy
Krystalline Kraus | While the G20 Summit occurred in 2010, the issue still is not settled more than five years later.
Columnists
Amy Goodman | Outcry in the U.S. has been consistent and growing, after each high-profile police killing of people of colour. People across the country are rallying to demand accountability and justice for all.
Columnists
Pro Bono, Brian Iler | Carding, the infamous police practice of stopping individuals for questioning, is back with a vengeance in Toronto. Who's holding police activities accountable to the community?
Blog
Krystalline Kraus | The premise of the demonstrations seems pretty simple: to prevent "business as usual" politics across Canada on February 13, 2015.
Blog
Riaz Sayani-Mulji | The Canadian Civil Liberties Association hosted a Toronto Police vs. Artists hockey game to "build bridges" with the community. But, what community was actually benefiting from this event?
Blog
Krystalline Kraus | The trial of Toronto Police Constable Andalib-Goortani began last week and the Crown has rested its case. The defence has now begun.
Blog
Krystalline Kraus | On Friday May 31, 2013, Ontario Superior Court Justice M. Gregory Ellies found Toronto Police Constable Glenn Weddell not guilty of assault.
Blog
Krystalline Kraus | Toronto Police Constable Glenn Weddell faces his first day in court today on charges stemming from the G20 Summit demonstrations of June 2010.
Blog
Krystalline Kraus | Wrongfully charged for organizing G20 violence, Community Activist Julian Ichim is bringing a four million dollar lawsuit against the Toronto Police Services Board and others.
Columnists
Matthew Behrens | While Ottawa engages in deep budget slashing, the feds are annually investing $11.3 million in promoting the Mounties' "brand."
News
In a response to police brutality against Occupy Toronto members, 100 activists blockaded 52 Division on Dundas Street. Photo: David Coombs/rabble.ca
Krystalline Kraus | Despite its concrete setting, Occupy Toronto's Osgoode location was a growing seed. But for the Toronto police, it was more like a useless weed instead of a miracle of spring.