Book Review
Image: Taylor Vick/Unsplash
Cristina D'Amico | Ronald Deibert's "Reset" presents a chilling portrait of our current communications infrastructure, but his solution misses the mark.
Columnists
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Rodrigo Samayoa, Digital Freedom Update | As we start a new year, let's look back at some of the highlights from 2019 and what is ahead for our digital rights.
Blog
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Philip Lee | Encryption is supposed to ensure that information stays private by scrambling data. In practice, security forces and corporate interests are keen to be able to crack any code.
Blog
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Philip Lee | The vast majority of Canadians have expressed concern about the protection of privacy, particularly around how online personal information is used.
Columnists
Image: OpenMedia
Victoria Henry, Digital Freedom Update | While the Liberals campaigned on a promise to reform notorious spying bill C-51, they just tinkered at the margins while introducing a host of new problems.
Columnists
Image: EFF Photos/Flickr
Victoria Henry, Digital Freedom Update | In much the same way as a border guard can go through the clothes in your luggage, they can thumb through the personal contents of your phone.
Columnists
Photo: michel banabila/Flickr
Brynn Leger, Pro Bono | The Supreme Court's ruling in R v Jarvis updates the analysis of a "reasonable expectation of privacy," but does it go far enough in addressing gendered violence?
Columnists
Digital rights sign. Photo: netzpolitik.org/Flickr
Marianela Ramos Capelo, Digital Freedom Update | From Facebook to Big Telecom to NAFTA, OpenMedia takes stock of what the previous year brought us in digital rights -- both accomplishments and challenges -- and what might come in 2019.
Columnists
Image: OpenMedia
Marianela Ramos Capelo, Digital Freedom Update | It's time the federal government holds political parties accountable for their use and misuse of Canadians' data.
Blog
Victoria Henry | Yesterday, Christopher Wylie, former Director of Research at Cambridge Analytica, testified before a Canadian parliamentary committee and answered questions on the state of privacy.
Columnists
Smile, you're on camera. Image: Intel Free Press/Flickr
Rick Salutin | I tend to see the horrors of manipulation as less striking than the signs of human ability to act independently anyway. How else do you explain unexpected events like Bernie Sanders' surge?
Blog
Marie Aspiazu | On February 8th, our Executive Director, Laura Tribe, testified before the Parliamentary committee reviewing Bill C-59, delivering thousands of voices and raising Canadians’ top privacy concerns.