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Brent Patterson | While cheaper gas means Canadian motorists could save $12 billion in 2015, it has other implications for the Harper government given its chosen dependence on a petro-economy.
Columnists
Duncan Cameron | Because of low oil prices and weakened commodity prices generally, resource exploitation, the motor of economic growth for the Conservatives, is slowing down. Can the Harper government recover?
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Stephen Kimber | Will "rewarding risk-takers, dreamers, doers and builders" really boost entrepreneurship and investment, or just fund more winter golfing vacations?
Blog
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Kaylie Tiessen | Here in Ontario, we have glimpsed the future, and it looks a lot like Austerity 2.0. That's what Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne's mandate letters set out for her cabinet last week.
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Kaylie Tiessen | The numbers for the first quarter of 2014 were released in the heat of summer. A closer look tells us this update deserves more attention than it got. Here are some highlights.
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Iglika Ivanova | In the wake of the Mount Polley Mine spill, it's time to reconsider the dangers of deregulation more broadly and rebuild government's capacity to effectively protect the public interest.
Blog
Photo: Paul VanDerWerf/flickr
Simon Tremblay-Pepin | Quebec's government has radically reduced its spending growth because it has decided that we need to tighten our belts collectively. Let's look into who will be most affected.
Columnists
Linda McQuaig | Moody's decision to downgrade Ontario's credit rating last week was manna from heaven to commentators and media pundits bristling at the notion that activist government could be making a comeback.
Columnists
Elizabeth Littlejohn | Hope is resilient; power gained by disinformation is brittle and punitive. What Tim Hudak offers is not hope for a healthier democracy or more jobs. We can do better.
Columnists
Jim Stanford | Further to my post about numerical problems in Tim Hudak's jobs plan, some have asked me about precisely how the Conference Board report simulated the corporate tax reduction discussed.
Columnists
Jim Stanford | The million jobs plan has a gaping 200,000 job hole in it, resulting from an obvious arithmetic error that throws into question the very competence of Tim Hudak's policy team.
Blog
Toby Sanger | A set of calculations show how Ontario Conservative leader Tim Hudak's promise to eliminate 100,000 public sector jobs will be felt at the local level, on cities and communities across the province.