Blog
Meghan Sali | Your OpenMedia team met with top officials at Public Safety Canada about Bill C-51 -- and we had lots to say!
Blog
Abigail Curlew | The Internet we know today is an unlikely combination of radical philosophy and military surveillance.
News
Image: Flickr/Blue Coat Photos and www.bluecoat.com
Abigail Curlew | How have the world's social media platforms not only convinced us into giving away virtually every bit of information about us, but made us happy to do it?
Blog
Duncan Pike | The government is listening to Canadians. This time, that's a good thing. We need you to tell the government exactly what you think needs to be changed with this law to protect your rights.
Blog
Laura Tribe | We're calling on Public Safety Minister Goodale to address this blatant violation of Canadians' Charter rights in the government
News
Image: Flickr/Carolina Alves
Abigail Curlew | As the House moves to debate amendments and changes to Harper's notorious anti-terror Bill C-51, we must remain vigilant against its true purpose: social control.
Blog
Emily Blake | Each week rabble.ca bloggers bring you insightful pieces on the stories behind the nation's headlines.
Blog
Image: Flickr/Elena Pleskevich
Am Johal | With the rise of Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin's popularity, Authoritarian Surveillance Democracy, where rights can be suspended at any time for any reason, is on the rise too.
Blog
Duncan Pike | On the anniversary of filing a Charter challenge to Bill C-51, CJFE is encouraging Canadians to make their voices heard on this issue through a new parliamentary e-petition.
Blog
Marie Aspiazu | VPD admitted it doesn't have the device, but recent revelations on RCMP use of Stingrays raise doubts on whether these devices have been used by other law enforcement agencies.
Podcast
Redeye Collective | Last June, the Harper government passed the Anti-Terrorism Act, expanding the mandate of CSIS and making it easier for government agencies to share information about Canadians.
Blog
Laura Tribe | The security of the Internet as we know it is based on encryption -- so why are authorities trying to break it?