News
President Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto sign the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement during a ceremony in Buenos Aires, on the margins of the G-20 Leaders' Summit on November 30, 2018. Image: U.S. Department of State/Flickr
Gordon Laxer | The new agreement, USMCA, is subject to review every six years. When it dies, Canada and the U.S. will revert to an old agreement with an energy clause that would kneecap any future climate action.
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Image: LeadnowCanada/Flickr
Sujata Dey | The old NAFTA gutted local economies by putting profit and free trade over people and the planet. Will the new agreement, which will likely be ratified in 2020, be any better?
News
Diana Yoon, Ian Borsuk | The Canadian government should show leadership and halt trade negotiations with the Mercosur Bloc (which includes Brazil) to stop an unprecedented acceleration in deforestation of the Amazon.
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Justin Trudeau and Mike Pence. Photo: Prime Minister of Canada website.
Brent Patterson | It's time for a rebellion against the new NAFTA that puts the pedal to the metal on climate breakdown.
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Image: U.S. Department of State/Flickr
Sujata Dey | As ratification processes clash, the Canadian government should not rubber-stamp this deal or accelerate it through Parliament. It should take the opportunity to push for progressive changes.
Columnists
U.S. Secretary of State Pompeo Visits Beijing, China, 2018. Photo: PAS China/Wikimedia Commons
Duncan Cameron | The U.S. remains the world's dominant power in every respect, with no serious rival. But that does not stop the U.S. from mounting campaigns of fear and paranoia about potential threats to its power.
Columnists
President Trump delivers remarks with Prime Minister Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto at the signing the USMCA trade agreement. Photo: Ron Przysucha/U.S. Department of State/Wikimedia Commons
Duncan Cameron | In a surreal Buenos Aires ceremony, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau were photographed on either side of U.S. President Donald Trump.
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David J. Climenhaga | In its heyday, General Motors employed about 40,000 people in Canada. Now that number is just over 8,000, and is set to fall by nearly half. The prime suspect in the ordeal? Donald Trump.
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Twitter photo via @JustinTrudeau.
Brent Patterson | A wealthy, privileged establishment defending liberal democracy risks being an accelerant, not an antidote, to right-wing populism.
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Brent Patterson | Jean Charest wants France to back CETA's investment provision, but concerns are raised about the impact that would have on elections to the European Parliament.
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Brent Patterson | An "electronic tidal wave" contributed to the defeat of the Multilateral Agreement on Investment in 1998, what lessons does that hold for us today?
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Brent Patterson | The transnational corporations that are driving climate chaos celebrate the new USMCA.