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Caribou. Image credit: Thomas/Flickr
David Suzuki | As long as we capitulate and default to easy solutions to complex problems, we'll likely continue to drive wildlife decline and disappearance.
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Image: 223 223/Unsplash
David Suzuki | When we turn away from the world not shaped by human hands and decrease our connection to other living things, we can be struck by profound loneliness.
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Image: Bureau of Land Management Oregon and Washington​/Flickr
David Suzuki | The aquaculture industry's own data show 33 per cent of farms exceeded the sea lice limit while juvenile salmon were migrating past this year.
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Image: Veni-Vidi Vint/Unsplash
David Suzuki | The role of any animal within its ecological niche is far more complicated than the single predator-prey interaction that culling purportedly tries to control.
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Two caribou on a highway in Alaska. Image: Terry Feuerborn/Flickr
David Suzuki | As cities that converted roads to bike lanes during lockdown enter recovery phases, many people are advocating to keep the lanes open. Having fewer roads for cars increases human and wildlife health.
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An Asian giant hornet, photographed by the Washington State Department of Agriculture on February 7, 2020. Image: Washington State Department of Agriculture/Flickr
David Suzuki | While the fear factor in the hornet story has drawn our attention to hornets and honeybees, most people don't know a honeybee, hornet or wasp from the more than 800 species of wild bees in Canada.
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Image: Mirjam Leuze/Facebook
Doreen Nicoll | "What if self-awareness, compassion and thinking were not exclusively human affairs?" asks Mirjam Leuze, director of "The Whale and The Raven."
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Image: J.H./Flickr
David Suzuki | The biggest threat to the Arctic is climate change, not geese. When nature is out of whack, human activity and our extractive economy are most often to blame.
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Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr
David Suzuki | Under current conservation practices, we breed endangered species in captivity, then release the captive-bred animals into the degraded habitats that failed to support the species in the first place.
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David Suzuki | Many wildlife populations in Canada are in peril. Politicians will look to the public to gauge the extent to which we consider wildlife loss a crisis.
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Caribou. Image: Andrew E Russell/Flickr
David Suzuki | We need to be clear that if we let a species go, it's because we're choosing other values over its survival.
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Photo: Pixabay
David Suzuki | In response to the need for action to protect and restore caribou habitat to reverse the creatures' decline, the Forest Products Association of Canada has done its part to stall the necessary changes.