News
Canadians advancing through German wire entanglements, Vimy Ridge, April 1917. Canada. Department of National Defence. Library and Archives Canada, PA-001029
Karl Nerenberg | This Remembrance Day there is special emphasis on World War I. Lest we forget, that war was not only brutal and deadly, it was also, in many ways, unnecessary and unjust
Blog
Béguinage of Lierre / begijnhof van Lier, Flanders - Belgium
Craig Gibson | A personal essay of a Canadian touring the battlegrounds of the Great War while Paris, and the world, recovers from terror.
Blog
Photo: flickr/iccardo Palazzani
David J. Climenhaga | The end of the most jingoistic decade in recent Canadian history may be a good time to remember that more than one poem sprang up from the bloody fields of Flanders.
Blog
Jessica Prupas | A roundup of the highlights from the Blogs this week
Columnists
Amy Goodman | In her epic book "The Guns of August," historian Barbara Tuchman detailed how the First World War began in 1914. We can look at that war in retrospect, 100 years later, as if through a distant mirror.
Blog
Mel Watkins | The First World War was certainly a great catastrophe with great suffering. But did it really deserve its pre-Second World War moniker?
Blog
Gavrilo Princip
David J. Climenhaga | Surely even Canada’s official pundits have enough wit to sense that nothing good can come playing games in Russia's back yard to achieve strategic and ideological goals.
Blog
Karl Nerenberg | The hyper-glandular attackers in the Harper team's poorly ventilated war room have graduated from blasting the Official Opposition for being pro-environment.
News
Harry Patch
Mick Sweetman | It's been an emotional week for me as Remembrance Day was again marked and we march towards the 100-year anniversary of the slaughter of the first World War.
Blog
Holly Adams | Resources for plays about war
Blog
Derrick O'Keefe | In Harper's Canada, there has been precious little official recognition of the history of Christmas truces.
Podcast
Redeye
Mordecai Briemberg | Six weeks after the Armistice was signed in 1918, a contingent of more than 4,000 Canadian soldiers mobilized for battle in a new theatre of war -- Siberia.