Blog
Image: Val Kerry/flickr
Trish Garner | There is not only a moral duty to eradicate poverty but also a legal obligation under international human rights law.
Blog
Photo: Homeless Hub/flickr
Marina Morrow | In B.C. there is currently no organization that consistently monitors legislation, policy and standards regarding the human rights of persons living with a mental illness.
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Photo: Hugo/flickr
Bill Black | A human rights commission is in a much better position than a tribunal to develop strategies and programs to help prevent discrimination.
Blog
Photo: andrea castelli/flickr
Lynell Anderson, Melanie Anderson | There is no institutional voice to raise public awareness about the commitments that Canada and B.C. have made to women's and children's rights, and in particular families with young children.
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Photo: Paul Bailey/flickr
Devyn Cousineau | B.C.'s low-wage workers need a Human Rights Commission. The responsibility for fighting discrimination in the workplace cannot be theirs alone.
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Photo: Jordan Lewin/flickr
Thérèse Boullard | B.C. is the only province without a publicly funded independent agency that works to prevent discrimination through public education, research, advocacy and the promotion of basic human rights.
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Photo: Zack Lee/flickr
Shelagh Day, Gwen Brodsky | Without a Commission, B.C. has no public institution that can take steps to prevent discrimination, educate the public, initiate inquiries on systemic issues, and promote human rights compliance.
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Photo: andres musta/flickr
Kathleen Ruff | Human rights are everyone's business. The social climate we live in affects us all. That is why we need a Human Rights Commission in B.C.