Columnists
Aerial view of person using computer laptop and a smartphone. Image: Rawpixel Ltd/Flickr
Marie Aspiazu, Digital Freedom Update | Big Telecom is fighting tooth and nail to reverse a landmark CRTC decision that already lowered internet prices in Canada. But we can still stop them.
Columnists
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with federal party leaders November 28, 2018. Image: Adam Scotti/PMO
Marie Aspiazu, Digital Freedom Update | The verdict of the election is here. So what is going to happen to the future of digital policy in Canada?
Columnists
Image: OpenMedia
Rodrigo Samayoa, Digital Freedom Update | The winner of this election will determine whether Canada's telecom oligopoly continues to rule or makes way for new competitors and lower prices.
Columnists
Ballot box. Image: Christian Bucad/Flickr
Rodrigo Samayoa, Digital Freedom Update | There is one thing that this year's candidates can promise that can have a noticeable impact on our wallets: the cost of telecommunications services that Canadians need to access the digital economy.
Columnists
Image: OpenMedia
Victoria Henry, Digital Freedom Update | While the Liberals campaigned on a promise to reform notorious spying bill C-51, they just tinkered at the margins while introducing a host of new problems.
Columnists
Image: OpenMedia
Digital Freedom Update, Marie Aspiazu | The B.C. government has announced its plan to improve customer protections for cell phone users and it could result in much-needed, groundbreaking changes.
Columnists
Image: OpenMedia
Rodrigo Samayoa, Digital Freedom Update | Remember the days when you could extend the life of computers, phones, vacuum cleaners and washing machines? Maybe it's time to reestablish our right to repair.
Columnists
Image: EFF Photos/Flickr
Victoria Henry, Digital Freedom Update | In much the same way as a border guard can go through the clothes in your luggage, they can thumb through the personal contents of your phone.
Columnists
Image: OpenMedia
Marianela Ramos Capelo, Digital Freedom Update | An internet tax would require internet service providers to pay into content funding. But taxing the open internet to subsidize a struggling Big Media content industry is not the way to go.
Columnists
Digital rights sign. Photo: netzpolitik.org/Flickr
Marianela Ramos Capelo, Digital Freedom Update | From Facebook to Big Telecom to NAFTA, OpenMedia takes stock of what the previous year brought us in digital rights -- both accomplishments and challenges -- and what might come in 2019.
Columnists
Protect Net Neutrality rally, San Francisco, September 2017. Photo: Credo Action/Wikimedia Commons
Rodrigo Samayoa, Digital Freedom Update | If Canada is to remain at the forefront of innovation and freedom, we need a robust net neutrality framework that doesn't benefit those with deep pockets and vested interests.
Columnists
Graphic credit: OpenMedia
Marianela Ramos Capelo, Digital Freedom Update | There is a gray, Schrödinger's cat kind of area in copyright. Enter: "orphan works" -- works that are neither public nor quite owned by someone.