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Philip Lee | Encryption is supposed to ensure that information stays private by scrambling data. In practice, security forces and corporate interests are keen to be able to crack any code.
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Person with cell phone. Image: Angelo Moleele/Unsplash
Philip Lee | Who will protect us from a collective vulnerability to misinformation, manipulation and cyber violence?
Columnists
Digital rights sign. Photo: netzpolitik.org/Flickr
Marianela Ramos Capelo, Digital Freedom Update | From Facebook to Big Telecom to NAFTA, OpenMedia takes stock of what the previous year brought us in digital rights -- both accomplishments and challenges -- and what might come in 2019.
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Marie Aspiazu | Last week, Canada signed a rebranded NAFTA deal after months of suspense and secretive negotiations. But what does the deal mean for the internet? Here's the lowdown.
Columnists
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David Christopher, Digital Freedom Update | Digital rights and the government's proposed reforms to Bill C-51 are top of mind for many Canadians as the House of Commons resumes for its fall session.
Columnists
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David Christopher, Digital Freedom Update | There are a number of concerns that come along with a renegotiation of NAFTA. Canadians enjoy stronger digital rights protections than their U.S. counterparts -- policies that could be placed at risk.
Columnists
David Christopher, Digital Freedom Update | 2017 is here, and it's clear it will be a make-or-break year for Internet freedom. Let's take a look at some of the big challenges ahead.
Columnists
David Christopher, Digital Freedom Update | Looking ahead to 2016, one thing is clear: challenges to our digital rights are set to intensify. Here are the five big ones that we will face this year.
Columnists
Meghan Sali, Digital Freedom Update | Although the previous government signed Canada on to the TPP, it will still need to be approved by the new Liberal government.
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Frustration! Bev Sykes on Flickr
Suzanne Smythe | What we need in this election is for someone to articulate a vision of digital inclusion that goes beyond the digital management of populations and attends to the digital rights of all Canadians.
Blog
David Christopher | Canada's 2015 federal election is shaping up to be a decisive contest, with Canadians' fundamental freedoms on the line.
Columnists
David Christopher, Digital Freedom Update | A new threat to the open Internet has arisen from an unusual source. Known as the "right to be forgotten," it could drastically change how people share, communicate and access information online.