Columnists
Image: Christiaan Colen/Flickr
Rodrigo Samayoa, Digital Freedom Update | The "Five Eyes" nations, including Canada, are looking to weaken encryption protocols that keep our digital information safe.
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Image: Marcus Spiske/Unsplash
Philip Lee | Encryption is supposed to ensure that information stays private by scrambling data. In practice, security forces and corporate interests are keen to be able to crack any code.
Activist Toolkit
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| One reason is an app that could be useful for whistleblowers
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Image: Pixabay
Victoria Henry | Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale is asking for your feedback in an online discussion -- let's make sure we speak out!
Columnists
Wayne MacPhail | The Apple vs. the FBI saga has been dizzying and challenging, but it comes down to this question: should citizens be able to know something that the government cannot get access to?
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Laura Tribe | The security of the Internet as we know it is based on encryption -- so why are authorities trying to break it?
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Laura Tribe | The RCMP should not violate Canadians' privacy rights and apply for a warrant to access Canadians' personal information.
Columnists
Wayne MacPhail | Having our eyes and hearts opened by the heinous attacks in Paris shouldn't also blind us to the more covert attacks on our civil liberties that may come as a second wave assault.
Columnists
Amy Goodman | The Internet has been a great leveller, but has also opened up to intense monitoring by corporations and government spies. Is democracy at risk?
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Steve Anderson | Canada's secretive, expensive, and out-of-control spying apparatus must be reined in.
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David Christopher | In just seven days, thousands of Canadians have pledged to stand with brave lawyers at the BCCLA against secret governmentt spying.