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Image: Steve Snodgrass/flickr
Angella MacEwen | What can government do to address precarious employment? A whole lot, it turns out.
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Photo: Paul Sableman/flickr
Armine Yalnizyan | Boost the minimum wage and you boost the economy, from the bottom up. Here's why we should be raising the roof about the benefits of raising the wage floor.
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Photo: Craig Bennett/flickr
Angella MacEwen | Where have we seen the strongest job growth or worst job losses, and what are the trends that might affect this in the coming year? Angella MacEwen offers her "things to watch" list for 2016.
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Image: Policy Note blog
Kevin Harding | Many Canadians believe there's a trade-off to be made between employment and environmental sustainability. But that doesn't have to be the case, particularly if we look at co-ops as a source of jobs.
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Photo: Kevin M Klerks/flickr
Lynne Fernandez | Could the Manitoba government do more? Absolutely. Is there room for criticism? No doubt. But let's play fair.
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Photo: Xiaojun Deng/flickr
Armine Yalnizyan | When it comes to job recovery, are we the best in show in the G7? That depends on what you measure.
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Image: Flickr/Premier of Ontario
Kaylie Tiessen | Ontario's labour market is still treading water. This morning's July jobs numbers showed zero (yes, zero) new jobs in Ontario.
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Angella MacEwen | The Canadian labour market added 29,000 jobs in March, beating expectations. Underneath the headline, though, the numbers aren't as rosy.
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Photo: Jake Wright/Wikimedia Commons
Angella MacEwen | In times like these we need a national jobs and training strategy. Pierre Poilievre's appointment signals inaction on the employment and training front, and should be a significant cause for concern.
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Kaylie Tiessen | Ontario started the New Year with very little change in its jobs numbers: the employment rate is holding steady but there is a shift in part-time job growth.
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Kaylie Tiessen | After a gain of 37,000 jobs in October, Ontario posted a loss of 33,900 jobs in November. Unfortunately, 80 per cent of those losses were in full-time work.
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Photo: Chris Blakeley/flickr
Angella MacEwen | The Liberal Party entered the EI debate by suggesting a one-year EI premium holiday for employers who hire new workers, a plan which rests on some pretty terrible math.