Blog
Image: Flickr/bcgovphotos
Martha Friendly | Parents cannot find and afford good quality child care for love or money. Child care is in short supply. Quality is all too often weak, and fees are too high for most low- and middle-income families.
Columnists
Duncan Cameron | As a self-declared feminist, Justin Trudeau must now be ready to accept challenges from the women's movement. As prime minister, he should aim to feminize public policy.
Blog
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Erika Shaker | We know what's required to meet the changing needs of today's families, and how out of reach child care is for too many families. Erika Shaker recounts her own experiences -- in theory and practice.
Blog
Photo: Prime Minister of Canada/flickr
Davis Carr | The question of whether the cost of the prime minister's nannies should come out of the public purse is central to this discussion. In fact, it's the only important discussion we should be having.
Blog
Photo: Jason Parks/flickr
Susan Prentice | In 1970, the Royal Commission on the Status of Women recommended a national child-care program. Fast-forward to 2015, and parents are more desperate than ever for affordable, quality child care.
Blog
Image: Flickr/YoungDoo M. Carey
Martha Friendly | It's pretty stunning to recognize that Canadian family life has experienced massive social change but that things haven't really changed when it comes to responsibility for child care.
Blog
Photo: sciencesque/flickr
Susan Prentice, Molly McCracken | Last week hundreds of educators, academics and activists gathered in Winnipeg for a national childcare conference, united by a vision of a universal early childhood education and childcare system.
Columnists
Linda McQuaig | Will the federal election battle be less over whether to send our warplanes to Iraq and more over whether to send our children to day care? It's shaping up to be that way.