Blog
Oil from Husky Energy pipeline spill into North Saskatchewan River.  Photo: Shel
Emma Lui, Daniel Cayley-Daoust | Though proponents claim pipelines are the so-called "safest" method of transporting oil, we have seen 8,360 spills in Saskatchewan since 2006. How is this considered safe?
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Brent Patterson | The Council of Canadians is warning about more oil spills on the West Coast should export pipelines proceed, after bunker fuel spilled from a cargo ship in English Bay this week.
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Photo: Islands in the St Lawrence/flickr (modified)
Emma Lui | The Great Lakes Commission released its draft report on the transport of crude oil in the Great Lakes region, which provides an overview of the increase of crude oil transportation in the area.
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Photo: Eric B./flickr
Brent Patterson | It's not just about shortfalls in revenue. Falling oil prices may also have a major impact on tar sands expansion, pipeline development, and even shipping bitumen on the St. Lawrence River.
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Michael Butler | There was more smoke and mirrors on Canada's rail tracks when the Harper government finally announced their long-awaited changes to rail safety 292 days after the preventable Lac-Mégantic disaster.
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Andrea Harden-Donahue | When TransCanada first announced the Energy East pipeline a number of voices emerged trumpeting its benefits. It's time to separate fact from fiction.
Columnists
Paula Boutis, Pro Bono | Given the reality that movement of dangerous goods is fraught with problems, it seems a reasonable question to ask why Canada has yet to take seriously the need to move to a low-carbon energy future.
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Photo: Carol Von Canon/flickr
Bertrand Schepper | Ever since the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, there's a question which constantly comes up with regards to oil transportation. Are we better off transporting oil by rail or using pipelines?